How to develop a Sense of Place

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Presentation used at Discover the World CPD event - July 2012

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  • @Technoliteracy Thanks for the comment - it's a tricky one ,but if students are equipped with ways of seeing the world, they can begin to think about what it MIGHT be like... there's no substitute for going to a place of course... but that isn't always possible.... Hope you found the presentation useful :)
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  • I like the question 'How can you develop an emotional connection with a place that you have never visited?' This is something that I grapple with as I attempt to help students to 1) understand the possible social ramifications of their actions; and 2) try to empathize with the plight of others that are sometimes so different from their own.
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  • How to develop a Sense of Place

    1. 1. Developing a Global Sense of Place at KS3 Alan Parkinson GeographerFormerly GA Secondary Curriculum Development Leader @GeoBlogs
    2. 2. “Now run upthe stairs...”
    3. 3. What is a ‘sense of place’ ?
    4. 4. KS3No National Curriculum ?Opportunity for ‘creative’ curriculum ...Work of GA’s National Curriculum group emerging later thisyear....
    5. 5. Sessions1. Where in the world ?2. The whole world in your hands...In each session:Pedagogy - teaching and learningIdeas to take away and use
    6. 6. ResourcesPack on the desks - thanks to DTW for duplicationhttp://slideshare.net/geoblogsDROPBOX shared folder
    7. 7. Session 1: Where in the World ? What do we mean by a ‘sense of place’ How do we develop one ? How do we develop our students’ sense of place ?
    8. 8. 1967
    9. 9. “Place is one of the trickiest words in the English language, a suitcase sooverfilled that one can never shut the lid...” Dolores Hayden, 1997 Image by Tim Caynes C Flickr
    10. 10. “a meaningful segment ofgeographical space”
    11. 11. “Childhood is a branch ofcartography” Michael Chabon
    12. 12. What does Norfolk ‘mean’ to you ?
    13. 13. How do we get to ‘know’a placeActivity / Discussion point
    14. 14. Wordle of results...
    15. 15. Word Clouds - pros & cons
    16. 16. ...more word clouds...
    17. 17. Haiku
    18. 18. “the visceral essence of place” Rachel Cook (2008)
    19. 19. Gulfoss, Iceland
    20. 20. My attemptAt the waterfallA congregation of iceShouts out ‘Let us spray’....
    21. 21. Your turn...Photosynthhttp://photosynth.net/embed.aspx?cid=a1019c04-6f5c-4ffe-ad2c-9cd0d5a22010&delayLoad=true&slideShowPlaying=false
    22. 22. #haboobhaiku
    23. 23. Start of enquiry ?
    24. 24. Global ImagesColliers Green Focus - importance of images...How do you source / share images ?
    25. 25. Think inside the box...Authentic learningArtefacts...Where can you get them from ?
    26. 26. Landscape in a BoxExamples from Noel Jenkinshttp://www.digitalgeography.co.uk/archives/2012/02/landscape-in-a-box-vol-1/VIMEO: http://vimeo.com/37202192
    27. 27. Activity What would go in a bag torepresent your ‘place’ ?
    28. 28. We’re all going on a summerholiday Colleagues... Google Map - destinations Pile of Blank DVDs
    29. 29. Google DocsCollaborative documents / presentationsAdd a slide for a new place...Building up an ‘atlas’ of places..
    30. 30. Image of the Dayhttp://www.discover-the-world.co.uk/school/trip/en/study-aid/photo-a-school-day/archive-images.html
    31. 31. ‘Sense of Place’
    32. 32. “Geography” – GA journalAutumn 2008 issue
    33. 33. Reading Travel Writing Tourist Guides Blog posts Twitter feedsImage: Shafik Hansraj
    34. 34. Geographers do not just see a place as an Eleanor Rawling ‘objective thing’ in the world that can be described and explained as they build up geographical knowledge.‘Place’ is also experienced on a personal and deeply emotional level. Eleanor Rawling
    35. 35. Discussion pointHow can you develop an emotionalconnection with a place that you havenever visited ?
    36. 36. Mapping - homeworks...es/7315705442/in/photostream
    37. 37. ‘Placeless places’....
    38. 38. 2. The Whole World in your Hands “You cannot write if you do not read. Getting literature into your head is the only way of getting it back out.” Simon Armitage
    39. 39. Don’t be afraid to teach...If learning is paramount, teaching issubservient to, and led by, the learning. Webecome embarrassed by teaching, and insteadtalk only about ‘facilitating’ learning.A profession that abrogates responsibility inthis way may be one that has lost confidence initself.David Lambert (my former ‘boss’)
    40. 40. Geography 5-16: the overarching framework PLACE SPACE ENVIRONMENT GEOG ENQUIRY (patterns and links) (physical and human (procedures and skills) (places, territories interaction) Examples of economic patterns Maps – what they show us, how to and regions) of production, distribution and use them and how to construct them Studies of fragile landscapes such change in industry, leisure,  as deserts, polar regions, agriculture How to use and apply geographic mountains and reefs information systems (GIS) Local place knowledge in Understanding of resource community and regional Understanding different distributions and food, water How to use a wide variety of context approaches to managing and and energy security on regional, sources, databases, and living with changing physical and national and international scale visualisation technologies, to analyse  human environments and evaluate Britain/UK knowledge, in Reasons for and processes Processes involved in distribution European context behind the location and How to investigate an and patterns of major physical changing distributions of environmental issue at first-hand or features, including natural regions  population using primary sources and ecosystems Broad world knowledge Understanding of flows and First hand investigation via Understand the Earth’s oceans including continents, movements of people, goods fieldwork: photography, GPS, and their significance oceans, countries, and ideas, with examples on a sketching, interviewing, meeting significant Earth features regional, national and global people etc Understand landscapes as such as wind patterns, scale distinctive collections of landforms, tectonic structures Writing descriptively and analytically soils and Earth surface processes about places, spaces and  Understanding of spatial environments; constructing and systems, such as climate, challenging arguments Investigating the links between In-depth studies of specific through the distribution of social, economic and places or regions different energy through ocean currents environmental quality from their own, focussing and wind patterns on people-environment Understanding renewable and non interactions renewable resources from the Earth and its atmosphere  Study of places of great significance in and for the world today (including at least China, USA, Europe)  In-depth study of places that are scenes of conflict at different scales (eg a local place, Afghanistan) 
    41. 41. Example of a content unit KS3 Catastrophic natural eventsProgramme Assessment (e.g. earthquakes and volcanoes)Through exposure to a variety of Pupils will show evidence of:examples, pupils developunderstanding of a range of • Foundational knowledgecatastrophic natural events: including The global distribution of volcanoes and plate boundariesearthquakes and volcanoes; extreme • Understandingweather events such as hurricanes, -explain the relationship between volcanic activity and plateand both river and coastal inundation. boundaries - describe the impact of volcanic eruptions on humanStudies should focus on the physical activities, and explain how people can respond to the hazardmechanisms of the eventsthemselves but also on broader • Procedures and skillsexplanations which include human They can use atlas and graphic skills to locate, describe and explain tectonic distributionsactions (such as deforestation) andthe continued human occupation of Thinking Geographicallyhazardous locations. The topic Scale and connection: Pupils understand that globalteaches about human response to processes, whether tectonic or climatic, can result in localised events ... which may themselves haveperceived risk, and the idea of widespread, even global consequences‘preparedness’ for natural hazards.
    42. 42. A Different View 6www.geography.org.uk/resources/adifferentview/downloads
    43. 43. Yi Fu Tuan “Place is security, space is freedom. “...place is whatever stable object catches our attention. AsandlookWe are attached to one we long at a panoramic scene our eyes for the of interest. pause at points other.” Each pause is time enough to Geographer, Yi-Fu Tuan create an image of a place that looms large momentarily in our view.” With thanks to Daniel Raven 2005
    44. 44. A distorted world-view ?
    45. 45. Place is “socially constructed”
    46. 46. Going to Extremes ?Telegraph - June 2012
    47. 47. Japanese Tourists
    48. 48. Curriculum MakingCurriculum making is the creative act ofinterpreting a curriculum specification or schemeof work and turning it into a coherent,challenging, engaging and enjoyable unit of work.Curriculum making is a job that really never endsand lies at the heart of good teaching.Prof David Lambert
    49. 49. RAVER = RelevantA = Academic / AuthenticV = VocationalE = Evaluated
    50. 50. Teaching& Learning
    51. 51. OFSTED The best geography seen was usually in schools which were participating in the professional development programme offered through the Action Plan for Geography, in specialist humanities schools where geography was one of the lead subjects or where the school shared good practice with local partner schools.
    52. 52. Recommendations Schools should: focus strongly on developing pupils’ core knowledge in geography, particularly their sense of place ensure that where they teach geography thematically or within a humanities programme, the subject elements are identified clearly and taught properly and the programmes of study are covered fully improve the quality of provision in Key Stage 3 so that more pupils are able to continue to study geography successfully at GCSE and post-16 provide subject-specific support and professional development to improve teachers’ confidence and expertise, enabling them to teach geography more effectively maximise opportunities for fieldwork to enhance learning and improve motivation and expertise in the teaching of geography.
    53. 53.  make the best use of new technology in geography to enthuse pupils and provide immediacy and relevance provide more opportunities for writing at length and focused reading, especially in secondary schools ensure that geography enables pupils to recognise their contribution to, and responsibilities for, their locality, their country and the global community develop and make best use of networks in order to identify and share good practice, ideas
    54. 54. ...in the movies...Visit/Scotland and Disney/Pixar
    55. 55. Movies for locations...
    56. 56. Discovering AntarcticaMovie activity availablehttp://www.discoveringantarctica.org.uk/multimedia/flash/1_makeatrailer.html
    57. 57. BloggingCan be used to:- build up anticipation of fieldtrip- convey information- keep parents up to date while on the fieldtrip- follow-up the experiences & publicise next year’s
    58. 58. HSD IcelandVal Vannet, Geography Teachernow Depute Head & President of SAGThttp://hsdiceland.blogspot.com
    59. 59. BloggingWhat else can blogs be used for ?How can they help develop a ‘sense ofplace’ ?
    60. 60. Think LinkA tool produced by teacher David RileyWatch a presentation on this on my VITAL Geography Portalhttp://www.triptico.co.uk/thinklink.html
    61. 61. FacebookTony Cassidy
    62. 62. Climbing Everest“Climbing Everest is not about climbing,it’s about breathing.”Conrad Anker
    63. 63. Kit List - where are we going ?• Sturdy walking boots/shoes & thick walking socks• Trainers and socks• Sturdy waterproof coat• Waterproof trousers• Warm jacket• Sleeping gear• Underwear & socks• Washing things and towels• Shirts and tee shirts• Trousers (3 pairs)- not jeans• Jerseys (3)- WARM• Swimming costume and towel• Plastic bags for dirty clothes• Towel• Water bottle and small plastic lunch box• Small rucksack
    64. 64. Illustrations: Tom Morgan Jones
    65. 65. Thanks & questions....http://livinggeography.blogspot.coma.parkinson@gmail.com

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