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“Empowering women for sustainable rural transformation”, FAO/TCI Workshop Report

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Gender Transformation: Agenda 2030 requires us to do more, do things differently and to move fast! Importantly, we need to work closer together with our partners to find, test and upscale relevant solutions. It was in this spirit that the FAO Investment Centre Division organized a workshop on 12-13 December 2017, entitled “Empowering women for sustainable rural transformation”.
The workshop was tailored to the needs of professional staff in FAO and IFAD working on investment design and implementation. It offered eight sessions of practical insights, supported by the opportunity for participants to share experiences and engage actively in group work. In addition to exploring the gender dimensions of rural livelihoods, preparing gender strategies, tracking performance and assessing gender impacts, the workshop focused on the intra-household dynamics that often act as socio-cultural barriers to women’s full participation in development. The workshop presented two methodologies: (i) the Gender Action Learning System which develops the skills of poor household members (men and women) or community groups to draw a shared vision and map the steps towards achieving it; and (ii) individual household mentoring, used as a mechanism for social inclusion. Participants discussed the central role played by the household in influencing livelihood outcomes and the importance of engaging men and women together in reducing gender inequalities and achieving transformative impacts. The workshop also addressed a number of key cross-cutting issues, from a gender perspective related to value chains, nutrition, youth and climate change. Participants discussed issues around women’s economic empowerment in agribusiness and their effective participation in value chains; the role of gender norms in accessing and utilizing food at the household level; the differentiated needs and priorities of young rural women and men and ways to address them; and the gender-differentiated impacts of climate change and how to respond.

The workshop was attended by 18 professionals from FAO and IFAD (8 male, 10 female) and facilitated by: the FAO Investment Centre Division: Clare Bishop - Senior Gender Specialist/Consultant, and Ida Christensen - Technical Adviser and Gender Focal Point; the FAO Social Policies and Rural Institutions Division: Ilaria Sisto - Gender and Development Officer, Szilvia Lehel - Gender and Environment Consultant, and Tomislav Ivancic - Decent Rural Employment Consultant; and the IFAD Policy and Technical Advisory Division: Beatrice Gerli, Gender Specialist.

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“Empowering women for sustainable rural transformation”, FAO/TCI Workshop Report

  1. 1. 1 TCI Gender Workshop 2017 “Empowering women for sustainable rural transformation” FAO-HQ, 12-13 December 2017 Table of Contents Summary...........................................................................................................................................2 I. Gender mainstreaming in the project cycle (Day 1)......................................................................2 Session 1: Gender inequalities in agriculture and rural development .....................................................2 Session 2: Collecting and analyzing livelihoods data from a gender perspective (Clare)........................3 Session 3: The use of gender markers and the main elements of a gender strategy..............................3 Session 4: Tracking performance and measuring impact.........................................................................3 II. Gender with a thematic focus (Day 2)..........................................................................................4 Session 5: Gender transformative approaches in value chains................................................................4 Session 6: A focus on intra-household dynamics and nutrition ...............................................................4 Session 7: A focus on youth ......................................................................................................................5 Session 8: A focus on climate change .......................................................................................................5 III. Evaluation ..............................................................................................................................5 IV. Annexes..................................................................................................................................7 Annex 1: Workshop agenda......................................................................................................................7 Annex 2: List of participants and facilitators ............................................................................................8 Annex 3: Evaluation Form.........................................................................................................................9
  2. 2. 2 Summary This was the sixth annual TCI Gender Workshop tailored to the needs of staff working on investment design and implementation. This year, in addition to the core business of mainstreaming gender in the project cycle, there was a focus on transformative approaches to tackle the root causes of gender inequalities and empower rural women. The workshop was opened by Mohamed Manssouri, Director of the Investment Centre; he emphasized that addressing the gender dimensions of agricultural and rural development is central to the UN mission, not a choice. He welcomed the training and urged participants to act boldly to identify and address gender inequalities. The first day addressed the core business of understanding the gender dimensions of rural livelihoods, preparing gender strategies, using gender markers, and tracking performance and assessing impact from a gender perspective. The second day focused on thematic topics: women’s economic empowerment in agribusiness and their effective participation in value chains; the role of intra-household dynamics in terms of food security and nutrition; the differentiated opportunities and challenges of young women and men; and integrating gender equality into FAO’s response to climate change. All sessions included practical insights, supported by the opportunity for participants to share experiences or group work. The full agenda is presented in Annex 1. The workshop was attended by 18 professionals: 10 attended full-time (70 per cent women) and 8 part- time (38 per cent women); in total comprising 7 from TCI, 7 from other FAO divisions and 4 from IFAD. The facilitation team comprised: Clare Bishop, TCI Consultant (Senior Gender Specialist); Ida Christensen, TCI Technical Adviser; Ilaria Sisto, ESP Gender and Development Officer; Szilvia Lehel, ESP Gender and Environment Consultant; Beatrice Gerli, IFAD Gender Specialist; and Tomislav Ivancic, ESP Decent Rural Employment. Please see Annex 2 for a full list of participants and facilitators. Details of each of the eight sessions are presented below. I. Gender mainstreaming in the project cycle (Day 1) Session 1: Gender inequalities in agriculture and rural development The opening session set the groundwork for the two-day workshop by identifying the five principal domains of gender inequality, key gender concepts and gender equality in SDGs. The discussion was illustrated with secondary data from Malawi which demonstrated the realities of rural women’s livelihoods, highlighting the point that sometimes the challenges they face are as a result of being rural (e.g. collecting water and firewood), sometimes as a result of being poor (e.g. female-headed households) and sometimes reflecting cultural norms and the roles ascribed to women (e.g. intra- household decision making and physical integrity). An overview of FAO’s commitment to addressing gender inequalities was provided with reference to the Policy on Gender Equality and in the context of the five Strategic Programmes. Resource: FAO (2012) Policy on Gender Equality
  3. 3. 3 Session 2: Collecting and analyzing livelihoods data from a gender perspective The second session focused on the key elements of conducting fieldwork and analyzing data. The sustainable livelihoods framework and data collection tools were outlined, and reference was made to the relevant sections of TCI’s Social Analysis Field Guide. The use of the wealth pyramid to help identify proposed project outreach among different beneficiary groups was demonstrated as a technique to engage with other mission members to strengthen design, particularly in terms of: (i) deepening outreach among poorer households and women; and (ii) ensuring graduated pathways for livelihoods development. The group work was based on a field visit to urban organic gardens on the outskirts of Maputo to identify who to meet and the key questions to ask. During the exercise, participants noted the importance of ensuring all mission members look at gender issues in their respective areas of work to ensure shared responsibility for strengthening gender outcomes, as well as learning lessons from previous projects. Resource: FAO (2011) Social Analysis for Agriculture and Rural Investment Projects, Field Guide E-learning: FAO (2014) Social Analysis for Agriculture and Rural Investment Projects Session 3: The use of gender markers and the main elements of a gender strategy This session focused on the use of gender markers to review the extent to which gender is mainstreamed in project design. Specific reference was made to FAO’s gender marker (with the categories of 0, 1, 2a and 2b) and its use was illustrated with reference to examples of typical FAO-style projects. The main elements of targeting and gender strategies were outlined and the importance of paying attention to the implementation arrangements (in terms of staffing, M&E, procedures, partners and community) was noted. Resources: FAO (2017) Guide to mainstreaming gender in FAO’s project cycle IFAD (2017) Poverty targeting, gender equality and empowerment toolkit Session 4: Tracking performance and measuring impact Several challenges were identified in the drive to track performance, including: how to move from quantitative to qualitative indicators of outreach and benefit; how to track outcomes and not just outputs; and – most importantly – how to tracks the results of gender transformative impacts. Various sources of information at different stages of the project cycle were noted. A common problem encountered is the mismatch between the logframe indicators which are often gender-sensitive and the failure of the M&E project implementation system to generate sufficient information to address those indicators. The Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index (WEAI) was described as innovative tool to generate information around various dimensions of women’s empowerment. An exercise demonstrated how to move from sex-disaggregated to gender-disaggregated data. Resources: FAO, IFAD and World Bank (2015) Gender issues in monitoring and evaluation, Module 16 in Gender in Agriculture Sourcebook WEAI Resource Center
  4. 4. 4 II. Gender with a thematic focus (Day 2) Session 5: Gender transformative approaches in value chains This session opened with a presentation on the findings from a study undertaken for Global Donor Platform for Rural Development on the gender-responsiveness of agribusiness projects of eight donor agencies (including FAO). Specific attention was paid to the differences between project activities which address basic gender inequalities (gender equity), those which broaden and deepen inclusion and empowerment (gender equality) and those which are doing things differently in order to tackle the underlying causes of gender inequality (gender transformative). Activities at the field level were correlated with the gender responsiveness of project management. The main drivers of a more gender transformative agenda included project context (the urgency of the need to address gender inequalities), donor commitment (with Australia’s DFAT and UK’s DFID being among the most committed, based on the project reports) and the skills and commitment of project management, partners and service providers. The group work focused on constructing different value chains (poultry, goats and vegetables), recognizing where women are involved and identifying entry points to broaden outreach and deepen impact for women. Resources: Global Donor Platform (2017) omen’s Economic Empowerment and Agribusiness: Opportunities for the gender transformative agenda FAO (2016) Developing gender-sensitive value chains, A guiding framework Session 6: A focus on intra-household dynamics and nutrition This session focused on the central role played by the household in influencing livelihood activities and outcomes. IFAD has been the one of the leading agencies working on household methodologies as one of the key gender transformative approaches to address the underlying root causes of gender inequality at the household level. The presentation described two methodologies: (i) one uses a group as an entry point to develop people’s skills in drawing visions, identifying and analyzing a household’s current situation, and mapping out opportunities and challenges to be overcome to realise their vision (the most complete approach is known as the Gender Action Learning System); and (ii) another which uses individual household mentoring as a mechanism for social inclusion. An exercise in plenary examined access to and utilization of food, referring to rural households the Central African Republic as an example. In this context of extreme poverty, it became apparent that the key issue was about differences in the quantity of food consumed by different household members rather than cultural taboos guiding who consumes what. In other contexts, where food is generally more abundant, cultural taboos typically play a significant role in determining the order in which members of the household eat, the quality and the quantity of foods consumed. Resources: IFAD (2014) Household methodologies toolkit FAO (2015) Designing nutrition-sensitive agricultural investments E-learning: Gender in nutrition and food security
  5. 5. 5 Session 7: A focus on youth The need to take account of the youth demographic is urgent, with 200 million people in sub-Saharan Africa already within the age band 15-24 years; this number is projected to double by 2050. Key areas of concern include employment – especially the opportunities for decent work – and migration. Since many of the youth will continue to live in rural areas, two specific challenges were noted: the role of agriculture as a sector is generally unattractive, as is living in rural areas poorly served with weak infrastructure. An exercise conducted in plenary demonstrated that the situation becomes more complex when youth is ‘unpacked’ to identify the differentiated needs and priorities of young women and young men. Resources: FAO, CTA and IFAD (2014) Youth and agriculture: Key challenges and concrete solutions FAO Youth: Present and future of agriculture Session 8: A focus on climate change The final session focused on integrating gender equality into FAO’s response to climate change. It is recognized that the impacts of climate change exacerbate gender inequalities. FAO has embraced the climate-smart agriculture approach to support actions aimed at achieving sustainable agricultural development for food security and nutrition under a changing climate. To succeed, climate-smart agricultural practices must consider gender-specific vulnerabilities, needs and capabilities. It was noted that FAO can make a difference for gender equality as an Implementing Agency for the two largest climate finance mechanisms, the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and the Green Climate Fund (GCF). Both carry gender-specific conditionalities and call for “projects that produce economic, social and gender development co-benefits.” Resources: FAO (2017) Strategy on Climate Change FAO, IFAD and World Bank (2015) Gender in climate-smart agriculture, Module 18 for Gender in Agriculture Sourcebook III. Participants’ Evaluation Ten participants completed the evaluation form at the end of the workshop (see Annex 3); 38 per cent indicated they were very satisfied with the workshop and a further 42 per cent were quite satisfied. The responses for individual sessions are indicated in the chart below. Participants appreciated the good overview of addressing gender inequalities in agricultural and rural development work; the use of examples; group activities and the opportunities to share experiences among participants; the ability to network with gender experts for knowledge sharing; and gaining information about available literature on gender and youth. Several participants appreciated the demonstration of practical tools, in particular: the target group pyramid which can be used to demonstrate project outreach during design missions; gender transformative approaches in value chains; and household methodologies. Some appreciated the operational aspects, such as data collection and livelihoods analysis, gender markers, gender indicators, gender strategy, and the Global Climate Fund requirements. A few sessions were considered to be too fast, or not very practical, or too long, leaving insufficient time for discussion and group-based exercises.
  6. 6. 6 Participants indicated a range of actions that they would do differently, as a result of attending the workshop, including:  understand the extent to which projects apply a gender transformative approach;  identify opportunities for promoting gender transformative approaches in project design and supervision, paying attention the broader issues that need to be included in order to achieve outcomes;  pay closer attention to TORs and CVs of team members to ensure competency to address gender issues;  engage more with HQ gender team (FAO and IFAD) for advice during project design;  make more use of available literature and secondary data. In terms of improving the design of future workshops, the following ideas were suggested:  strengthen the transformative story by placing it in the context of the culture change framework (knowledge, attitudes and behaviour) to help guide identification of necessary actions, change agents and entry points;  spend more time on gender transformative approaches and cover household methodologies in more depth;  spend more time on impact assessment and M&E in the context of the SDGs;  pay more attention to scaling up and sustainability issues;  provide more time for group work;  provide a more balanced range of snacks during the health break. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Focus on climate change Focus on youth Household methodologies + nutrition GTA in value chains Tracking performance + impact Gender markers + strategies Livelihoods data Gender inequalities in ARD Paerticipants' evaluation of sessions Not satisfied Slightly satisfied Quite satisified Very satisfied
  7. 7. 7 IV. Annexes Annex 1: Workshop agenda Tuesday 12th December 2017 09.00 – 09.30 Welcome! 09:30 – 10:45 Session 1: Gender inequalities in agriculture and rural development, setting out the key gender concepts and the pursuit of gender equality in the SDGs and Agenda 2030, as well as FAO’s Strategic Framework 10:45 – 11:00 Coffee break (marble staircase 5th floor) 11:00 - 12:30 Session 2: Collecting and analyzing livelihoods data from a gender perspective using the livelihoods framework 12:30 – 14:00 Lunch 14:00 – 15:00 Session 3: The main elements of a gender strategy and the use of gender markers 15:00 – 15:15 Coffee break (marble staircase 5th floor) 15:15 – 16:30 Session 4: Tracking performance with gender indicators and measuring impact using the Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index Wednesday13th December 2017 09:15 – 10:45 Session 5: Gender transformative approaches in value chains and FAO framework for inclusive and gender-sensitive value chains 10:45 – 11:00 Coffee break (marble staircase 5th floor) 11.00 – 12.30 Session 6: A focus on nutrition, examining the role played by household dynamics for nutrition outcomes 12:30 – 14:00 Lunch 14:00 -15:00 Session 7: A focus on youth, addressing the importance of unpacking “youth” from a gender perspective 15:00 – 15:15 Coffee break (marble staircase 5th floor) 15:15 – 16:30 Session 8: A focus on climate change, identifying the key elements for developing gender- sensitive climate investments 16.30 – 16.45 Wrap up and farewell!
  8. 8. 8 Annex 2: List of participants and facilitators Female Male TCI Claire Buob Ibro Monomi * Giorgia Nicolo * Marc Moens * Clare O'Farrell * Brent Simpson Julian Vallet * Other FAO Verdiana Biagiono Gazzoli Maurizio Furst Genevieve Braun Tomislav Ivancic * Arwa Khalid * Karki Sameer * Monique Trudel IFAD Ilaria Firman Steven Jonckheere Elisa Mandelli Nerina Muzurovic * Part-time Trainers and facilitators  Clare Bishop, Senior Gender Specialist, Consultant  Ida Christensen, Technical Adviser / Gender Focal Point, TCI  Ilaria Sisto, Gender and Development Officer, ESP  Szilvia Lehel, Gender and Environment Consultant, ESP  Beatrice Gerli, Gender Specialist, IFAD
  9. 9. 9 Annex 3: Evaluation Form I work in: TCI ; FAO (not TCI) ; Not FAO  I am: male  female  Please indicate your level of satisfaction by placing an X along the scale1 : Not at all Slightly Quite well Very much Session 1: Gender inequalities in agriculture and rural development     Session 2: Collecting and analyzing livelihoods data from a gender perspective     Session 3: Targeting and gender strategy, and gender markers     Session 4: Tracking performance and measuring impact     Session 5: Gender transformative approaches in value chains     Session 6: Household methodologies and nutrition     Session 7: A focus on youth     Session 8: A focus on climate change     1 Leave blank if you did not attend the session. Evaluation Form
  10. 10. 10 1. What did you find most useful about the Workshop? Please provide some examples. 2. Were there things that you found less useful? Please explain. 3. What will you do differently as a result of this training? Please explain. Thank you! Overall comments

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