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WINTER 2013
Up for the
Challenge
Our clients often include individuals and organizations
that not only focus on the business objectives of their
projects, but also on how those projects may impact
the environment and positively contribute to their
communities. In this issue, you will find CEC collaborating
with nationally recognized experts on a high-performing
sustainable site for a cultural institution, working with
educators to develop an outdoor curriculum for high school
students, and remediating a legacy industrial site to safe
standards for future use. When consistent with our clients’
project objectives, CEC is able to incorporate solutions and
designs that enhance the economic and environmental
health of the communities in which we reside.
Elements in your Email
To opt in to a digital version, email elements@cecinc.com.
InsideT H I S I S S U E
Serving Our Clients
and Communities
1 U P F O R T H E CH A L L E N G E
Phipps Zeros In on Sustainability
3 A D R A M AT I C D I F F E R E N CE
New Life for a Historic Mining Site
4 SP OT L I G H T
Interview with Ryan Slack
4 L I F E I S B U T A ST R E A M
Science for the Real World
4 I N T H E N E WS
NSF Grant Awarded
1
On the Cover:
The new Center for Sustainable Landscapes at
Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens has
emerged as one of the greenest buildings on Earth.
3
4
4
4
Kenneth R. Miller, P.E.
President and CEO
www.cecinc.com
Civil & Environmental Consultants, Inc.
“When we think about the type of
world we would want our children and
grandchildren to inherit, it is easy to see
why the Living Building Challenge is so
important. And when we look at how a
dedicated team of professionals came
together to create the CSL, we know that
we have the technology and capacity to
create that future now.”
– Richard V. Piacentini, Executive Director
Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens
The new Center for
Sustainable Landscapes
at Phipps Conservatory and
Botanical Gardens in Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania, opened in January
2013, more than six years after
conceptual discussions began.
For a historic non-profit institution and
cultural gem like Phipps, whose primary
inhabitants are some of nature’s finest
botanical specimens, waiting for things
to grow and bloom is not unusual. This
project, however, will soon set a precedent
in high-performance design both locally and
internationally, and everyone, it seems, is
eager to see the fruits come to bear.
In 1999, the groundwork was laid for a
three-phased master plan for renovation
and expansion at Phipps. Phase I, the
new Welcome Center, was the first LEED®
-
certified visitor center in a public garden.
Phase II’s Tropical Forest Conservatory is
now known as “the most energy-efficient
continued on next page
elements WINTER 2013
Up for the
ChallengePhipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens
Zeros In on Sustainability
The lagoon captures and filters surface and roof
runoff as part of a stormwater treatment system
integral to achieving net-zero water performance.
conservatory in the world,” and the
production greenhouses were recently
certified Platinum under the LEED EBOM
program. Phase III was slated to be a
new center for education, research and
administrative operations.
And so began the life of the Center for
Sustainable Landscapes (CSL). In late
2006, Phipps’ Executive Director Richard
V. Piacentini championed a sustainable
design for Phase III that aligned with the
International Living Future Institute’s
groundbreaking green building process,
the Living Building Challenge.
The Challenge states: “Imagine a building
designed and constructed to function
as elegantly and efficiently as a flower.”
Version 1.3 of the Challenge (which is
updated periodically) included sixteen
imperatives that a project must fulfill. These
imperatives are distributed among six
performance areas, also known as Petals:
Site, Energy, Materials, Water, Indoor
Quality, and Beauty & Inspiration.
This 1,700-gallon underground cistern stores runoff
water from the CSL roof for reuse as flush water.
continued from previous page
CEC led final development of the strategy
that addressed the Water Petal and its two
imperatives: net-zero water and sustainable
water discharge. The strategy included
on-site sanitary treatment, stormwater
management, and water reuse systems.
A closed-loop system for the biological
treatment and filtration of sanitary water
includes two constructed wetland cells, two
sand filtration beds and an ultraviolet filter
to disinfect water for reuse as greywater
(or flush water) within the CSL. This system
significantly reduces the CSL’s need to
draw potable water from the city’s system,
in addition to minimizing the impact on
municipal sewage treatment.
The design also involved harvesting the
Pittsburgh region’s abundant rainwater. A
1,700-gallon underground cistern stores
rainwater for irrigation at the CSL, as well
as backup water for the sanitary reuse
system. An 80,000-gallon underground
modular rainwater harvesting tank
captures additional site stormwater runoff.
Harvesting some of the estimated 2.7
million gallons of rainwater that will fall
on the CSL site annually will significantly
reduce the burden on the city’s stormwater
management system and the entire Phipps
campus’s need to pull potable water.
A lagoon system manages runoff and
serves as a biological stormwater treatment
system, similar to the natural treatment that
occurs in wetlands and marshes. With its
reflecting pool-like quality, trickling water
sounds, elegant landscaping and inviting
boardwalk, the lagoon is one of several
D
connected landscape communities that
continue the main conservatory experience
throughout the CSL site.
“High-performing buildings don’t just
get switched on,” said Michael Takacs,
CEC Principal and head of the Landscape
Architecture practice. “They require
additional time to adjust and fine-tune their
operational parameters. All of the circuitry
and programming for these components
are in place, but making them talk to one
another the way they are intended must
be adjusted manually over time.”
Phipps has been conducting performance
monitoring of all the different spaces for
treatment on site. “As a conservatory and
botanical garden, it’s important to know
exactly what is being put on the plants. A
big part of what we’re doing now is periodic
water quality testing to examine what is
going in versus what is coming out,” said
Jason Wirick, Phipps’ Director of Facilities
and Sustainability Management.
“Our hope is to showcase the performance
of more passive and sustainable site water
systems,” Wirick said. “CEC cares about
the project and about what we’re doing at
Phipps.”
The CSL achieved LEED Platinum certification
from the U.S. Green Building Council in
September 2013, and received a Green
Design Citation at the AIA Pittsburgh Design
Awards in October 2013. Along with the
Living Building Challenge, the CSL is currently
pursuing the Sustainable Sites Initiative™
SITES™ certification for landscapes. ■
The lagoon’s plants and their
symbiotic root microbes absorb
organic and mineral nutrients in
a multi-step filtration process.
CEC is monitoring the efficiency and
effectiveness of the CSL’s green roof
through the use of data loggers, which
incorporate sensors that measure
temperature, water discharge rate and
quantity, and soil moisture.
The green roof has reduced runoff by
more than 87% annually, while any water
not absorbed by the roof has ended up
in the site’s stormwater recovery tanks
or rain gardens (bioretention areas). No
measured runoff went to the storm sewer,
even during Hurricane Sandy in October
2012, when the CSL experienced a storm
event with more than 2.8 inches over a
24-hour period.
The CSL is on target to meet the net-
zero demands of the Living Building
Challenge’s Water Petal imperative. ■
d
Rainwater is captured and
measured on the CSL’s green roof
as part of an extensive
monitoring system.
ACHIEVED!
SITES™
certification
First to earn 4 stars
November 18, 2013
“The difference between back then
and today cannot be overstated.”
– Dale Oglesby, Mayor of Galena, Kansas
Dale Oglesby leases ten acres
of a former smelter site in Galena, Kansas,
for his salvaged materials business; he also
just so happens to be the town’s mayor.
Galena was a mining boomtown named
after its rich deposits of lead sulfide, an
ore found in abundance in the area. To
extract valuable metals such as lead or
zinc from the ore, extreme heat and a
chemical reducing agent decompose the
ore in a process called smelting, releasing
byproducts as gases or slag and leaving
only the desired metals. In 1878, the
EaglePicher Company built the only smelter
in town. It was the largest lead and zinc
smelter in the world.
EaglePicher was smelting in spades until
1980, after the mines were exhausted and
Galena’s mining companies abandoned
ship. The smelter would soon be abandoned
as well.
EaglePicher declared Chapter 11 Bankruptcy
in 2005, and assets of value were sold
nationwide. However, there remained
seventeen environmentally impaired sites,
including the smelter in Galena. A trust
fund was established to remediate the
impaired sites to commercial and industrial
standards, of which $6.5 million was
dedicated to the highly contaminated
148-acre Galena site.
Not wanting to lose the historical mining-
era structures, Mayor Oglesby contacted
William West, the Custodial Trustee for the
remediation fund. “My business encourages
reutilization of old assets,” said Oglesby.
“I knew the EaglePicher facility would be a
classic example of finding a way to make
salvaged property useful again.”
CEC was retained in 2006 as the
environmental consulting firm for all of
the impaired EaglePicher sites, with Vice
President Marty Knuth serving as project
manager. An environmental investigation
program was prepared and implemented
to evaluate the nature and extent of
contamination in Galena. “Dealing with
A REMEDIATION PLAN BREATHES NEW LIFE INTO A HISTORIC MINING SITE
nearly 150 acres is an awesome task,” said
West. “The key thing was CEC’s approach for
characterization of the site’s environmental
issues.”
To delineate areas of contamination, CEC
performed instant on-site screening of soil
samples using an X-ray fluorescence (XRF)
spectrometer, saving time and limited
cleanup funds. CEC was instrumental in
helping state agencies understand the
efficacy of the XRF for accurate readings
(versus conventional testing and lab
characterization).
The prescribed remediation involved
excavation of impacted soils and on-site
encapsulation in a consolidation cell
topped with a revegetated cover, which CEC
designed. Short Creek, a stream running
through the property, was dredged of lead-
contaminated sediments, and upland areas
along the stream were remediated, regraded
and revegetated. In all, 191,000 cubic yards
of soil were included in the earthwork plan.
“Environmental actions will be complete
before the end of 2013,” said Knuth. All of
the buildings also were remediated and are
now being utilized—nothing was wasted.
Acres where smelter waste and heavy metal
contamination prevented vegetation for
100 years are now reseeded and growing.
“There has been a dramatic change in the
landscape,” said Oglesby. “If it hadn’t been
for the Custodial Trust and CEC, the site
wouldn’t be what it is today.” ■
The site investigation identified the presence of up
to 350,000 mg/kg of lead and more than 18,000
mg/kg of mercury, among other contaminants.
An aerial photograph of the
EaglePicher smelter facility
and site taken in 1945.
elements WINTER 2013
Spotlight
Q
What projects require
threatened and endangered
species surveys and why?
A Any project involving tree clearing or
any kind of government permitting
or funding, which is the big trigger.
There is huge demand for these surveys
within the expanding natural gas industry,
where connecting new well pads to midstream
services and, in some cases, connecting
multi-state pipelines is critical.
Q
What would you say are some
of the biggest challenges
clients face with regard to
these surveys?
A There is a shortage of trained
and certified people to perform
the work. At CEC, we have different
tiers of qualified bat biologists and a good
mix of all the qualifications in house. Our
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service-approved bat
surveyors are experienced in conducting
habitat assessments and mist-net surveys
for the federally endangered gray bat (Myotis
grisescens) and Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis).
Indiana bats range across 29 states, and we
have somebody in-house who is supremely
qualified in most of those core states.
Q
Where are we in a
typical survey life cycle?
A From November 15th to March
31st, clients can cut trees down
free and clear if there are no known
populations of Indiana bats around. USFWS
evaluates every project and allows for an
opportunity to cut the trees in the winter when
the bats are in caves and not on the landscape
where they could be harmed. However, if
we don’t catch anything during our summer
surveys, clients may cut trees any time of the
year, not just during this short winter time frame.
Q
How can CEC help keep
projects on track?
A The original May 15th to August 15th
survey window is shrinking in some
states, like Ohio where it’s now June
15th to July 31st. We have to rethink how we do
our surveys in different states. It’s good to have
an army of people like we do. This started last
summer and it’s only going to continue. We’re
prepared for that.
IN THE
NEWSNSF GRANT AWARDED
CEC Principal Timothy Nuttle, Ph.D., was
awarded a National Science Foundation
grant to investigate changes in stream
conditions and how they affect the
kinds of insects and other small
invertebrates that are available as
feedstock for birds – specifically the
Louisiana Waterthrush, a species of bird
that lives in forests along streams. The
research is being conducted at
Powdermill Nature Reserve, a field
station of Pittsburgh’s Carnegie
Museum of Natural History, and is a
collaboration between CEC, Carnegie
Museums of Pittsburgh, The National
Aviary, Duquesne University, and the
University of Guelph in Ontario. ■
More than 1,200 surface and 1,200
subsurface soil samples were collected to
delineate areas of contamination at the
former EaglePicher smelter site in Galena,
Kansas. Each sample location provided
scientists with concentration information
for up to seven constituents: mercury,
lead, chromium, copper, zinc, arsenic and
cadmium.
It was clear that traditional methods
of mapping would not be sufficient,
considering the amount of data collected.
Tom DiVittis, CEC’s Corporate CADD
Program Development Manager, had an
idea to employ 3D visualization using
AutoCAD®
Civil 3D®
software, a program
typically utilized for modeling of surface
topography and above-ground data.
Once the data was entered, the graphic
conveying the extent of contamination
was produced rapidly. The modeling
showed how much contaminated soil
existed at each test location and at what
depths, as well as how much would need
to be excavated and encapsulated. ■
“CEC’s creative thinking
helped us identify a
completely new set of
workflows and opened
new avenues.”
–Chakri Gavini, Senior Product Manager
Autodesk, Inc. (developer of Civil 3D
software)
B
VISUALIZING THE EXTENT
OF CONTAMINATION
When “excited” by an
external energy source,
atoms emit X-ray photons
that help determine what
elements are present
in a sample.
Bat Biologist Ryan Slack Sounds Off
LIFE IS BUT
A STREAM
SCIENCE FOR THE REAL WORLD
The new Cardinal Wuerl North Catholic
High School in Cranberry Township,
Pennsylvania, has entered the final phases
of construction and site development,
during which time CEC completed two
stream restoration projects within the
watershed that were constructed to offset
stream impacts.
Presented with a unique opportunity
to expand the curriculum to include
outdoor classroom experiences, school
administrators engaged CEC in the
development process, believing the stream
restoration projects would provide excellent
subject matter. Dan Maltese, head of CEC
elements WINTER 2013
Elements is published by Civil & Environmental
Consultants, Inc. for clients, business partners
and other associates.
Civil & Environmental Consultants, Inc.
333 Baldwin Road
Pittsburgh, PA 15205
www.cecinc.com
G E F F B OTTO M L E Y | Publisher
E M I LY C H I O D O | Editor/Writer
TA R A K I R K M A N | Art Director
B D & E , I N C . , P I TTS B U R G H | Design
P H OTO C R E D I TS
Paul g. Wiegman
Denmarsh Photography
Kansas Historical Society
Michael Dougherty
Tara Kirkman
John Buck
Martin Knuth
David Roth
Phillip Pritchard
Special thanks to Amanda DiGregorio
For information, address changes, corrections or
additions to the mailing list, contact 1.800.365.2324
or email elements@cecinc.com.
OFFICES
Austin, TX
Boston, MA
Bridgeport, WV
Charlotte, NC
Chicago, IL
Cincinnati, OH
Cleveland, OH
Columbus, OH
Detroit, MI
Export, PA
Indianapolis, IN
Nashville, TN
North Central PA
Philadelphia, PA
Phoenix, AZ
Pittsburgh, PA
(Headquarters)
St. Louis, MO
Toledo, OH
Back Cover:
CEC PHOTO CONTEST WINNER
PHILLIP PRITCHARD
NORTH CENTRAL PA
CEC sponsors a Photo-of-the-Month contest
encouraging employees to submit pictures
from their work sites. The winning photo
is published on CEC’s internal website and
Facebook page.
Q
What sets CEC apart
from other companies?
A Our wildlife biologists maintain
an excellent rapport and a solid
relationship with all the federal
agencies and the state agencies where we
primarily do work. Our employees have the
opportunity to develop their own relationships
so these contacts don’t just think of me when
they think of CEC, and I think that makes
us stronger.
Q
What’s new from a regulatory
standpoint this year?
A On October 2nd, USFWS proposed
to list the northern long-eared
bat (Myotis septentrionalis) on
the federal register. That is directly because
of White-Nose Syndrome (a disease named
for the white fungus that infects skin of the
muzzle, ears, and wings of hibernating bats).
It is still unknown how White-Nose Syndrome
is being spread. One possible solution to the
problem might be to keep our hands off the
bats. USFWS has released different protocols
in an attempt to transition the surveys from
netting to acoustic detection, which minimizes
the amount of handling that the species must
go through.
Q
It sounds like you are truly
interested in this work.
A I didn’t grow up wanting to be a
bat biologist, but when I actually
got into it, I found bats interesting.
People who did not necessarily intend to get
into this type of work have helped change
perceptions. There is a shift from fearing
the bat as a creature of the night with rabies
to caring about and not living in fear of the
animal. Part of helping with bat recovery is
giving people an understanding. I have a lot
of clients who now say, “Tell me how I can help
my kids experience this.” ■
and shrubs along the newly restored
channels, highlighting the importance of
re-establishing native vegetation for the
benefit of wildlife. Students also learned
how natural channel design principles
were implemented to create a stable
stream channel using natural materials.
CEC’s restoration projects provide
real-world examples of science and
engineering in action. ■
Pittsburgh’s ecological services practice,
and Mike Shema, an ecological project
manager, helped administrators find ways
to take advantage of the site’s unique
natural assets while incorporating such
educational topics as biology, hydrology,
hydraulics, math, and physics.
In October, 43 current high school
juniors joined CEC to plant native trees
Corporate Office
333 Baldwin Road
Pittsburgh, PA 15205–9702
Senior Leadership
Integrated Services
Personal Business Relationships
A CEC survey crew member captured this early morning scene while performing an as-built survey on a section of a natural gas pipeline in West Virginia.
Civil/Site Engineering | Environmental Services | Ecological Services | Waste Management | Water Resources
Civil & Environmental Consultants, Inc.
PRESORTED
Standard
US POSTAGE
PAID
PITTSBURGH, PA
PERMIT NO. 205

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Elements_Winter_2013

  • 1. WINTER 2013 Up for the Challenge
  • 2. Our clients often include individuals and organizations that not only focus on the business objectives of their projects, but also on how those projects may impact the environment and positively contribute to their communities. In this issue, you will find CEC collaborating with nationally recognized experts on a high-performing sustainable site for a cultural institution, working with educators to develop an outdoor curriculum for high school students, and remediating a legacy industrial site to safe standards for future use. When consistent with our clients’ project objectives, CEC is able to incorporate solutions and designs that enhance the economic and environmental health of the communities in which we reside. Elements in your Email To opt in to a digital version, email elements@cecinc.com. InsideT H I S I S S U E Serving Our Clients and Communities 1 U P F O R T H E CH A L L E N G E Phipps Zeros In on Sustainability 3 A D R A M AT I C D I F F E R E N CE New Life for a Historic Mining Site 4 SP OT L I G H T Interview with Ryan Slack 4 L I F E I S B U T A ST R E A M Science for the Real World 4 I N T H E N E WS NSF Grant Awarded 1 On the Cover: The new Center for Sustainable Landscapes at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens has emerged as one of the greenest buildings on Earth. 3 4 4 4 Kenneth R. Miller, P.E. President and CEO www.cecinc.com Civil & Environmental Consultants, Inc.
  • 3. “When we think about the type of world we would want our children and grandchildren to inherit, it is easy to see why the Living Building Challenge is so important. And when we look at how a dedicated team of professionals came together to create the CSL, we know that we have the technology and capacity to create that future now.” – Richard V. Piacentini, Executive Director Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens The new Center for Sustainable Landscapes at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, opened in January 2013, more than six years after conceptual discussions began. For a historic non-profit institution and cultural gem like Phipps, whose primary inhabitants are some of nature’s finest botanical specimens, waiting for things to grow and bloom is not unusual. This project, however, will soon set a precedent in high-performance design both locally and internationally, and everyone, it seems, is eager to see the fruits come to bear. In 1999, the groundwork was laid for a three-phased master plan for renovation and expansion at Phipps. Phase I, the new Welcome Center, was the first LEED® - certified visitor center in a public garden. Phase II’s Tropical Forest Conservatory is now known as “the most energy-efficient continued on next page elements WINTER 2013 Up for the ChallengePhipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens Zeros In on Sustainability The lagoon captures and filters surface and roof runoff as part of a stormwater treatment system integral to achieving net-zero water performance. conservatory in the world,” and the production greenhouses were recently certified Platinum under the LEED EBOM program. Phase III was slated to be a new center for education, research and administrative operations. And so began the life of the Center for Sustainable Landscapes (CSL). In late 2006, Phipps’ Executive Director Richard V. Piacentini championed a sustainable design for Phase III that aligned with the International Living Future Institute’s groundbreaking green building process, the Living Building Challenge. The Challenge states: “Imagine a building designed and constructed to function as elegantly and efficiently as a flower.” Version 1.3 of the Challenge (which is updated periodically) included sixteen imperatives that a project must fulfill. These imperatives are distributed among six performance areas, also known as Petals: Site, Energy, Materials, Water, Indoor Quality, and Beauty & Inspiration. This 1,700-gallon underground cistern stores runoff water from the CSL roof for reuse as flush water.
  • 4. continued from previous page CEC led final development of the strategy that addressed the Water Petal and its two imperatives: net-zero water and sustainable water discharge. The strategy included on-site sanitary treatment, stormwater management, and water reuse systems. A closed-loop system for the biological treatment and filtration of sanitary water includes two constructed wetland cells, two sand filtration beds and an ultraviolet filter to disinfect water for reuse as greywater (or flush water) within the CSL. This system significantly reduces the CSL’s need to draw potable water from the city’s system, in addition to minimizing the impact on municipal sewage treatment. The design also involved harvesting the Pittsburgh region’s abundant rainwater. A 1,700-gallon underground cistern stores rainwater for irrigation at the CSL, as well as backup water for the sanitary reuse system. An 80,000-gallon underground modular rainwater harvesting tank captures additional site stormwater runoff. Harvesting some of the estimated 2.7 million gallons of rainwater that will fall on the CSL site annually will significantly reduce the burden on the city’s stormwater management system and the entire Phipps campus’s need to pull potable water. A lagoon system manages runoff and serves as a biological stormwater treatment system, similar to the natural treatment that occurs in wetlands and marshes. With its reflecting pool-like quality, trickling water sounds, elegant landscaping and inviting boardwalk, the lagoon is one of several D connected landscape communities that continue the main conservatory experience throughout the CSL site. “High-performing buildings don’t just get switched on,” said Michael Takacs, CEC Principal and head of the Landscape Architecture practice. “They require additional time to adjust and fine-tune their operational parameters. All of the circuitry and programming for these components are in place, but making them talk to one another the way they are intended must be adjusted manually over time.” Phipps has been conducting performance monitoring of all the different spaces for treatment on site. “As a conservatory and botanical garden, it’s important to know exactly what is being put on the plants. A big part of what we’re doing now is periodic water quality testing to examine what is going in versus what is coming out,” said Jason Wirick, Phipps’ Director of Facilities and Sustainability Management. “Our hope is to showcase the performance of more passive and sustainable site water systems,” Wirick said. “CEC cares about the project and about what we’re doing at Phipps.” The CSL achieved LEED Platinum certification from the U.S. Green Building Council in September 2013, and received a Green Design Citation at the AIA Pittsburgh Design Awards in October 2013. Along with the Living Building Challenge, the CSL is currently pursuing the Sustainable Sites Initiative™ SITES™ certification for landscapes. ■ The lagoon’s plants and their symbiotic root microbes absorb organic and mineral nutrients in a multi-step filtration process. CEC is monitoring the efficiency and effectiveness of the CSL’s green roof through the use of data loggers, which incorporate sensors that measure temperature, water discharge rate and quantity, and soil moisture. The green roof has reduced runoff by more than 87% annually, while any water not absorbed by the roof has ended up in the site’s stormwater recovery tanks or rain gardens (bioretention areas). No measured runoff went to the storm sewer, even during Hurricane Sandy in October 2012, when the CSL experienced a storm event with more than 2.8 inches over a 24-hour period. The CSL is on target to meet the net- zero demands of the Living Building Challenge’s Water Petal imperative. ■ d Rainwater is captured and measured on the CSL’s green roof as part of an extensive monitoring system. ACHIEVED! SITES™ certification First to earn 4 stars November 18, 2013
  • 5. “The difference between back then and today cannot be overstated.” – Dale Oglesby, Mayor of Galena, Kansas Dale Oglesby leases ten acres of a former smelter site in Galena, Kansas, for his salvaged materials business; he also just so happens to be the town’s mayor. Galena was a mining boomtown named after its rich deposits of lead sulfide, an ore found in abundance in the area. To extract valuable metals such as lead or zinc from the ore, extreme heat and a chemical reducing agent decompose the ore in a process called smelting, releasing byproducts as gases or slag and leaving only the desired metals. In 1878, the EaglePicher Company built the only smelter in town. It was the largest lead and zinc smelter in the world. EaglePicher was smelting in spades until 1980, after the mines were exhausted and Galena’s mining companies abandoned ship. The smelter would soon be abandoned as well. EaglePicher declared Chapter 11 Bankruptcy in 2005, and assets of value were sold nationwide. However, there remained seventeen environmentally impaired sites, including the smelter in Galena. A trust fund was established to remediate the impaired sites to commercial and industrial standards, of which $6.5 million was dedicated to the highly contaminated 148-acre Galena site. Not wanting to lose the historical mining- era structures, Mayor Oglesby contacted William West, the Custodial Trustee for the remediation fund. “My business encourages reutilization of old assets,” said Oglesby. “I knew the EaglePicher facility would be a classic example of finding a way to make salvaged property useful again.” CEC was retained in 2006 as the environmental consulting firm for all of the impaired EaglePicher sites, with Vice President Marty Knuth serving as project manager. An environmental investigation program was prepared and implemented to evaluate the nature and extent of contamination in Galena. “Dealing with A REMEDIATION PLAN BREATHES NEW LIFE INTO A HISTORIC MINING SITE nearly 150 acres is an awesome task,” said West. “The key thing was CEC’s approach for characterization of the site’s environmental issues.” To delineate areas of contamination, CEC performed instant on-site screening of soil samples using an X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer, saving time and limited cleanup funds. CEC was instrumental in helping state agencies understand the efficacy of the XRF for accurate readings (versus conventional testing and lab characterization). The prescribed remediation involved excavation of impacted soils and on-site encapsulation in a consolidation cell topped with a revegetated cover, which CEC designed. Short Creek, a stream running through the property, was dredged of lead- contaminated sediments, and upland areas along the stream were remediated, regraded and revegetated. In all, 191,000 cubic yards of soil were included in the earthwork plan. “Environmental actions will be complete before the end of 2013,” said Knuth. All of the buildings also were remediated and are now being utilized—nothing was wasted. Acres where smelter waste and heavy metal contamination prevented vegetation for 100 years are now reseeded and growing. “There has been a dramatic change in the landscape,” said Oglesby. “If it hadn’t been for the Custodial Trust and CEC, the site wouldn’t be what it is today.” ■ The site investigation identified the presence of up to 350,000 mg/kg of lead and more than 18,000 mg/kg of mercury, among other contaminants. An aerial photograph of the EaglePicher smelter facility and site taken in 1945. elements WINTER 2013
  • 6. Spotlight Q What projects require threatened and endangered species surveys and why? A Any project involving tree clearing or any kind of government permitting or funding, which is the big trigger. There is huge demand for these surveys within the expanding natural gas industry, where connecting new well pads to midstream services and, in some cases, connecting multi-state pipelines is critical. Q What would you say are some of the biggest challenges clients face with regard to these surveys? A There is a shortage of trained and certified people to perform the work. At CEC, we have different tiers of qualified bat biologists and a good mix of all the qualifications in house. Our U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service-approved bat surveyors are experienced in conducting habitat assessments and mist-net surveys for the federally endangered gray bat (Myotis grisescens) and Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis). Indiana bats range across 29 states, and we have somebody in-house who is supremely qualified in most of those core states. Q Where are we in a typical survey life cycle? A From November 15th to March 31st, clients can cut trees down free and clear if there are no known populations of Indiana bats around. USFWS evaluates every project and allows for an opportunity to cut the trees in the winter when the bats are in caves and not on the landscape where they could be harmed. However, if we don’t catch anything during our summer surveys, clients may cut trees any time of the year, not just during this short winter time frame. Q How can CEC help keep projects on track? A The original May 15th to August 15th survey window is shrinking in some states, like Ohio where it’s now June 15th to July 31st. We have to rethink how we do our surveys in different states. It’s good to have an army of people like we do. This started last summer and it’s only going to continue. We’re prepared for that. IN THE NEWSNSF GRANT AWARDED CEC Principal Timothy Nuttle, Ph.D., was awarded a National Science Foundation grant to investigate changes in stream conditions and how they affect the kinds of insects and other small invertebrates that are available as feedstock for birds – specifically the Louisiana Waterthrush, a species of bird that lives in forests along streams. The research is being conducted at Powdermill Nature Reserve, a field station of Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Museum of Natural History, and is a collaboration between CEC, Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, The National Aviary, Duquesne University, and the University of Guelph in Ontario. ■ More than 1,200 surface and 1,200 subsurface soil samples were collected to delineate areas of contamination at the former EaglePicher smelter site in Galena, Kansas. Each sample location provided scientists with concentration information for up to seven constituents: mercury, lead, chromium, copper, zinc, arsenic and cadmium. It was clear that traditional methods of mapping would not be sufficient, considering the amount of data collected. Tom DiVittis, CEC’s Corporate CADD Program Development Manager, had an idea to employ 3D visualization using AutoCAD® Civil 3D® software, a program typically utilized for modeling of surface topography and above-ground data. Once the data was entered, the graphic conveying the extent of contamination was produced rapidly. The modeling showed how much contaminated soil existed at each test location and at what depths, as well as how much would need to be excavated and encapsulated. ■ “CEC’s creative thinking helped us identify a completely new set of workflows and opened new avenues.” –Chakri Gavini, Senior Product Manager Autodesk, Inc. (developer of Civil 3D software) B VISUALIZING THE EXTENT OF CONTAMINATION When “excited” by an external energy source, atoms emit X-ray photons that help determine what elements are present in a sample. Bat Biologist Ryan Slack Sounds Off LIFE IS BUT A STREAM SCIENCE FOR THE REAL WORLD The new Cardinal Wuerl North Catholic High School in Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania, has entered the final phases of construction and site development, during which time CEC completed two stream restoration projects within the watershed that were constructed to offset stream impacts. Presented with a unique opportunity to expand the curriculum to include outdoor classroom experiences, school administrators engaged CEC in the development process, believing the stream restoration projects would provide excellent subject matter. Dan Maltese, head of CEC
  • 7. elements WINTER 2013 Elements is published by Civil & Environmental Consultants, Inc. for clients, business partners and other associates. Civil & Environmental Consultants, Inc. 333 Baldwin Road Pittsburgh, PA 15205 www.cecinc.com G E F F B OTTO M L E Y | Publisher E M I LY C H I O D O | Editor/Writer TA R A K I R K M A N | Art Director B D & E , I N C . , P I TTS B U R G H | Design P H OTO C R E D I TS Paul g. Wiegman Denmarsh Photography Kansas Historical Society Michael Dougherty Tara Kirkman John Buck Martin Knuth David Roth Phillip Pritchard Special thanks to Amanda DiGregorio For information, address changes, corrections or additions to the mailing list, contact 1.800.365.2324 or email elements@cecinc.com. OFFICES Austin, TX Boston, MA Bridgeport, WV Charlotte, NC Chicago, IL Cincinnati, OH Cleveland, OH Columbus, OH Detroit, MI Export, PA Indianapolis, IN Nashville, TN North Central PA Philadelphia, PA Phoenix, AZ Pittsburgh, PA (Headquarters) St. Louis, MO Toledo, OH Back Cover: CEC PHOTO CONTEST WINNER PHILLIP PRITCHARD NORTH CENTRAL PA CEC sponsors a Photo-of-the-Month contest encouraging employees to submit pictures from their work sites. The winning photo is published on CEC’s internal website and Facebook page. Q What sets CEC apart from other companies? A Our wildlife biologists maintain an excellent rapport and a solid relationship with all the federal agencies and the state agencies where we primarily do work. Our employees have the opportunity to develop their own relationships so these contacts don’t just think of me when they think of CEC, and I think that makes us stronger. Q What’s new from a regulatory standpoint this year? A On October 2nd, USFWS proposed to list the northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis) on the federal register. That is directly because of White-Nose Syndrome (a disease named for the white fungus that infects skin of the muzzle, ears, and wings of hibernating bats). It is still unknown how White-Nose Syndrome is being spread. One possible solution to the problem might be to keep our hands off the bats. USFWS has released different protocols in an attempt to transition the surveys from netting to acoustic detection, which minimizes the amount of handling that the species must go through. Q It sounds like you are truly interested in this work. A I didn’t grow up wanting to be a bat biologist, but when I actually got into it, I found bats interesting. People who did not necessarily intend to get into this type of work have helped change perceptions. There is a shift from fearing the bat as a creature of the night with rabies to caring about and not living in fear of the animal. Part of helping with bat recovery is giving people an understanding. I have a lot of clients who now say, “Tell me how I can help my kids experience this.” ■ and shrubs along the newly restored channels, highlighting the importance of re-establishing native vegetation for the benefit of wildlife. Students also learned how natural channel design principles were implemented to create a stable stream channel using natural materials. CEC’s restoration projects provide real-world examples of science and engineering in action. ■ Pittsburgh’s ecological services practice, and Mike Shema, an ecological project manager, helped administrators find ways to take advantage of the site’s unique natural assets while incorporating such educational topics as biology, hydrology, hydraulics, math, and physics. In October, 43 current high school juniors joined CEC to plant native trees
  • 8. Corporate Office 333 Baldwin Road Pittsburgh, PA 15205–9702 Senior Leadership Integrated Services Personal Business Relationships A CEC survey crew member captured this early morning scene while performing an as-built survey on a section of a natural gas pipeline in West Virginia. Civil/Site Engineering | Environmental Services | Ecological Services | Waste Management | Water Resources Civil & Environmental Consultants, Inc. PRESORTED Standard US POSTAGE PAID PITTSBURGH, PA PERMIT NO. 205