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V5 wals and lesson study 2016

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A presentation given to the World Association of Lesson Study on a future for lesson study, challenges and limitations

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V5 wals and lesson study 2016

  1. 1. + World Association of Lesson Study 3 September, 2016 @DrGaryJones Jones.gary@gmail.com http://evidencebasededucationalleadership.blogspot.com
  2. 2. + My argument is ….  Education is plagued by both fads and zombie ideas  When introducing new or old ideas and practices to schools and classrooms, school leaders and teachers should use some form of disciplined inquiry, for example, evidence-based practice (EBP)  EBP involves making a decision through a conscientious, explicit and judicious use of the best available evidence from a multiple of sources – so as to increase the likelihood of a favourable outcome  If such a process is applied to Lesson Study (LS) within a school, although the adoption of LS has the potential to provide benefits – a small-scale pilot might be appropriate.  Nevertheless, – it is a judgment call – which depends upon on the phronesis of school leaders and the particular needs of the school.
  3. 3. +  …. educational innovation is famous for its cycle of early enthusiasm, widespread dissemination, subsequent disappointment, and eventual decline - the classic swing of the pendulum. (p752) SLAVIN, R. E. 1989. PET and the pendulum: Faddism in education and how to stop it. Phi Delta Kappan, 70, 752-58.
  4. 4. + Zombie ideas  Graded lesson observations can be used for the purpose of high-stakes teacher accountability  A 0.4 effect size represents a year’s worth of progress for pupils of any age  One-day workshops will bring about changes in teachers’ behaviours and attitudes  Grammar schools will increase social mobility
  5. 5. + Evidence-based practice
  6. 6. + Evidence-based medicine : a definition  … the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. The practice of evidence based medicine means integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available external clinical evidence from systematic research. By individual clinical expertise we mean the proficiency and judgment that individual clinicians acquire through clinical experience and clinical practice. Increased expertise is reflected in many ways, but especially in more effective and efficient diagnosis and in the more thoughtful identification and compassionate use of individual patients' predicaments, rights, and preferences in making clinical decisions about their care DAVID L SACKETT, W. M. C. R., J A MUIR GRAY, R BRIAN HAYNES, W SCOTT & RICHARDSON 1996. Evidence based medicine: what it is and what it isn't. British Medical Journal, 312, 71-72.
  7. 7. +
  8. 8. + Evidence-based practice and four sources of evidence
  9. 9. + Misconceptions associated with evidence-based practice   Evidence-based practice ignores the expertise and knowledge of teachers and head-teachers.  Evidence-based practice is the same as research- informed practice.  Evidence-based practice involves teachers undertaking research  Evidence-based practice is all about numbers and statistics.
  10. 10. + Misconceptions associated with evidence-based practice   School Leaders need to make decisions quickly and don’t have time for evidence-based practice.  Each school is unique, so the usefulness of scientific evidence is limited.  If you do not have high-quality evidence, you cannot do anything  Good-quality evidence gives you the answer to the problem.
  11. 11. + Lesson Study and four sources of evidence
  12. 12. + The Four Sources of Evidence and Lesson Study
  13. 13. + Scientific Research Findings   Duration  Rhythm  Designed for participants’ needs  Alignment  Sense of purpose  Content  External facilitators  Specialists  Collaboration and peer learning  Leadership around professional learning
  14. 14. + Scientific research findings  Potential benefits of LS  Teacher collaboration and development of a professional learning community  Development of professional knowledge, practice and professionalism  More explicit focus on pupil learning  Improved quality of classroom teaching and learning XU, H. & PEDDER, D. 2014. Lesson Study. Lesson Study, 29.
  15. 15. + Causal evidence  There is some evidence that Lesson Study could have a positive impact in English schools, but not yet enough to justify scaling it up.  An evaluation of the UK’s National Strategies’ Leading Teachers Programme, which involved Lesson Study, showed that those schools using this approach (among others) out- performed a comparison group in both English and Mathematics.  Lesson Study also shares many of the key characteristics of effective CPD that were identified in a systematic review produced by the Evidence for Policy and Practice Information and Co-ordinating Centre.
  16. 16. +  The lesson study approach had broad appeal with headteachers and staff but was adapted widely by leading teachers and, in some instances, was not well understood as a process by supported teachers.  This raises issues as to the quality of the lesson study approach that is developing in some schools. The preference for mainly in‐house approaches to lesson study is also likely considerably to reduce its effectiveness as a professional development tool.  As lesson study is based on combining a broad approach to improving children’s learning with a specific focus on a group of children in a particular curriculum area, there is a danger that adapting the approach in schools could become reductionist and technicist, merely offering teaching tips and strategies. HADFIELD, M., JOPLING, M. & EMIRA, M. 2011. Evaluation of the National Strategies’ Primary Leading Teachers Programme. London, Department for Education.
  17. 17. + Expert opinion  Lesson study is an extremely time-consuming exercise  There is little agreement about what lesson study actually is  May not be viable given teacher workloads  There is insufficient evidence for its utility for it to be a priority for schools
  18. 18. + School data, facts and figures  What are the current challenges facing the school ?  What is the existing approach to professional learning  Lesson observations  Teachers as researchers/inquirers  Professional learning community  How strong is pupil voice within the school?  How is the school located within networks – internal and external  What curriculum and qualifications changes are being implemented?  How stable is the senior team  What resources are available?  Financial  Time  Expertise
  19. 19. + Views of stakeholders  How do staff feel about the use of Lesson Study or other approaches?  Do they see downsides or unintended negative consequences?  How do senior leaders and HODs feel about Lesson Study?  How practical or workable do those responsible for implementing the interventions feel?  What do pupils feel about involvement in Lesson Study  What alternative explanations and proposed solutions do others have? Eg micro-teaching, peer-coaching, instructional rounds, strategic inquiry
  20. 20. + Personal experience  Have I seen Lesson Study in use before?  What happened?  What are my beliefs about the successful teacher learning ?  What’s worked in the past and why?  What are my hunches?  How relevant and applicable is my experience?  Who do I know in similar circumstances who has used Lesson Study or similar alternatives – did it work?
  21. 21. +
  22. 22. + Making a decision
  23. 23. + Making a decision to proceed Justified by research No Yes Pragmatic Yes No
  24. 24. Framework for analysis of context Participants’ will Sizing up a context No Commitment Some Commitment Strong Commitment Extant know- how limited Limited capacity Very small- scale test Very small- scale test Very small- scale test Good capacity Very small- scale test Very small- scale test Small-scale test Substantial know-how exists Limited capacity Very small- scale test Small-scale test Large-scale test Good capacity Small-scale test Large-scale test Implement BRYK, A. S., GOMEZ, L. M., GRUNOW, A. & LEMAHIEU, P. G. 2015. Learning to improve: How America's schools can get better at getting better.
  25. 25. + XU, H. & PEDDER, D. 2014. Lesson Study. Lesson Study, 29.  Majority of studies neglected to address the processes through which the impact of LS on teacher learning and students outcomes is achieved  The majority of studies relied on teachers’ accounts – need to focus on different kinds of talk and language  Lack of attention to: micro- politics, building trust, norms of collegiality
  26. 26. Framework for analysis of context Participants’ will Sizing up a context No Commitment Some Commitment Strong Commitment Extant know- how limited Limited capacity Very small- scale test Very small- scale test Very small- scale test Good capacity Very small- scale test Very small- scale test Small-scale test Substantial know-how exists Limited capacity Very small- scale test Small-scale test Large-scale test Good capacity Small-scale test Large-scale test Implement BRYK, A. S., GOMEZ, L. M., GRUNOW, A. & LEMAHIEU, P. G. 2015. Learning to improve: How America's schools can get better at getting better.
  27. 27. +
  28. 28. +  What are the net, net consequences of all my options?  What are my core obligations?  What will work in the world as it is?  Who are we?  What can I live with?
  29. 29. + To recap – my argument is …..  Education is plagued by both fads and zombie ideas  When introducing new ideas and practices to schools and classrooms, school leaders and teachers should some form disciplined inquiry to investigate its feasibility  EBP involves making a decision through a conscientious, explicit and judicious use of the best available evidence from a multiple of sources – so as to increase the likelihood of a favourable outcome  If such a process is applied within a school to the adoption of Lesson Study (LS), although LS has the potential to provide benefits - at best only a small-scale pilot could be justified.  Nevertheless, – it is a judgement call – which depends upon on the phronesis of school leaders and the particular needs of the school
  30. 30. + @DrGaryJones jones.gary@gmail.com http://evidencebasededucationalleadership.blogspot.com

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