Doing research better: The role of meta‐data

634 views

Published on

Presentation given by David Leon, Professor of Epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in January 2012. Subsequently reused at various internal events

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
634
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Doing research better: The role of meta‐data

  1. 1. Doing research betterThe role of meta‐data  David Leon Professor of Epidemiology
  2. 2. Sharing Data imperative• Consensus among Research Funders (MRC, Wellcome Trust, ESRC, NIH etc. etc.) that studies they fund should  make their data accessible to wider scientific  community• This does NOT mean data is “dumped” onto the web  and made freely accessible without restriction• Emphasis on establishing principle, mechanisms and  transparent procedures• Underpinned by belief that replication, pooling and  “new ideas for old data” advance scientific knowledge
  3. 3. Perceived and real costs of data sharing (the researchers perspective)• Intellectual property• Motivation of researchers (why bother if other  researchers feed off my life’s work)• Huge time commitment to educate 3rd party  users and tell them about what data there is,  what’s its strengths and weaknesses are etc.• My team’s time taken up providing datasets  and servicing endless requests and queries
  4. 4. LSHTM initiative onresearch data (2009‐10) David Leon (Chair) Taane Clark, Paul Fine, Judy Green (Faculty representatives )  Carolyn Lloyd (Librarian) Victoria Cranna (Archivist) Sheena Wakefield (NST)
  5. 5. http://intra.lshtm.ac.uk/infoman/research/
  6. 6. Useful external linkshttps://intra.lshtm.ac.uk/infoman/research/research_resources.html
  7. 7. Key recommendations• Develop portal/gateway for discovery of key data assets;• Develop web‐based resources for researchers; • Develop policies/guidance on : – obtaining appropriately wide consent to permit data sharing, – maintenance of confidentiality and minimising risk of disclosure of identities, – establishment of data access processes and model data sharing agreements, – inclusion of adequate budget lines on new grant applications (reflected in pFACT), – best practice and minimal standards for data documentation; • Review institutional incentives for developing meta‐data; • Review career pathways for information specialists;• Introduce staff, taught course and doctoral training on  documentation and meta‐data – principles and practice;• Encourage flag ship data sets/resources to develop high  standard meta‐data and access procedures
  8. 8. Recommendations fully accepted  by SMT in summer 2011
  9. 9. Improving how we document data: Raising standards  and lowering barriers
  10. 10. Trolley bus syndrome
  11. 11. The codebook is here ….  somewhere
  12. 12. We can do better ….
  13. 13. What is meta‐data ?• It’s data about data• Two levels : – Study‐level description  • Setting, numbers of subjects, endpoints, exposure  variables, biological samples collected • Who to contact to find out more etc. – Variable level description • Instrument/questionnaire used • Frequencies/means/missing values • Comments on validity/utility 
  14. 14. Web‐based applications provide  high level of functionality• Enables discovery of data• Easy to navigate (hyperlinks are great  strength)• Can combine access to meta‐data with  documentation of instruments including  protocols, questionnaires etc.• As appropriate allows “drill‐down” from study  level to variable‐level
  15. 15. Up‐sides of good (web‐based)  variable‐level meta‐data• Facilitate analysis by existing researchers• Reduce induction of new researchers in own  group or visitors• Reduce costs of providing data to bona fide 3rd party researchers• Easy to edit, add to and update• Can have “shopping‐basket” facility
  16. 16. Down‐sides of web‐based variable‐ level meta‐data• Requires investment  – Funders claim they will pay• Not appropriate for all studies (scale, duration  of future use)• Lack of clarity about best platform  – DDI3 – open source looks very promising• Limited experience at LSHTM
  17. 17. Some examples …
  18. 18. URLs• Aberdeen Children of the 1950s cohort study http://www.abdn.ac.uk/aconf/• Izhevsk Family Study (registration required) http://www.ifsmetadata.info/
  19. 19. But … no one size fits all !
  20. 20. Next steps at LSHTM
  21. 21. Research Data Management  Steering Group• Established January 2012 by the Senior  Leadership Team• Chaired by Professor Anne Mills (Deputy  Director Research)• Time limited• Links to other initiatives (eg LSHTM Research  Online)• Resources obtained from WT (> Gareth Knight)

×