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  1. 1. 1Toronto2036
  2. 2. Toronto Waterfront2
  3. 3. Premise3—Understanding Toronto—Site Potentials——Transferium——Boulevard Mix Strip——Arts District——Park Strip——Heritage Market——Creative City—AppendixTable of Contents
  4. 4. Toronto Waterfront4
  5. 5. Premise5The Gardiner has long been acknowledged as a barrier between Toronto and its waterfront, seques-tering the city from one of its key ecological assets and limiting development along its path. Remov-ing the upper deck of the Gardiner offers both the best integration of the roadway with itssurroundings and the greatest number of opportunities for navigating across it.Reimagining the Gardiner as a grade-level boulevard—Lakeshore Boulevard—we have elaboratedseveral key connections across it. Each of these navigates the new Lakeshore Boulevard in adifferent way, passing over, under or across it to create links between key cultural and urban pointsand the waterfront.These connections, while necessary, will not be sufficient to support the growth of the area. Ourproposal looks not only at crossing the Gardiner, but at potential new transit modes along it. Theeast end of the site is a crossroads of the highway, the future relief subway line, and the commuterrail. By creating a new transit hub at their conjunction—a Transferium that combines 6,000 parkingspaces with stations for various modes of public transit—transportation to and from downtown canbe reorganized and amplified, unlocking the untapped promise of Toronto’s waterfront as not onlyan environmental amenity but as a new ground for Toronto’s future growth.In an age that has learned the limits of growth through sprawl, our proposal uses the opportunity ofthe Gardiner’s alteration to imagine a new “smart growth” strategy for the city. This strategy offers anew dynamic between the past and the future, development and the environment, focusing develop-ment adjacent to the city’s core and linking it with the city as a whole.
  6. 6. Toronto Waterfront6$574 BNChicago$253 BNDetroitGross Domestic Product ($BN)New YorkLos AngelesChicagoBostonSan FranciscoTorontoDetroitMontreal 1,0506324612952682091981201,4007925743633012532531482005 2009
  7. 7. Premise7$1.4 TNNew York$363 BNBoston$148Billion$253 BNTorontoToronto has shifted from being Canada’s major city to one ofNorth America’s leading financial centers.
  8. 8. Toronto Waterfront8Toronto’s quality of life and economic development, even post crisis, have kept pace withor outstripped its neighbors.Manufacturing17%Whole Sale Trade8%Retail Trade5%Transport & Warehousing4%Information & Culture4%Financial Services14%Real Estate14%Professional Services7%Arts & Entertainment1%Accomodation & Food2%Other Commercial Services5%Health Care5%Education4%Public Admin4% Construction5% Utilities1%Source: City of Toronto 2010 Econometrics Model800780760740720700680660640620600580NewYorkChicagoTorontoBostonGlobalFinancialCentersIndex(GFCI)Source: Z-Yen Group1,5001,2501,00075060050045040035030025020020052009GDP(BN)Year Source: PricewaterhouseCoopers0.6%2.0%5.2%DisposableIncome GrowthEmploymentGrowthProductivityGrowthSource: Toronto Board of TradeData Years: 2003 - 200817%12%9%4%Los AngelesChicagoBostonTorontoSan FranciscoNew YorkSource: LA WeeklyData Year: 2008Green SpaceContribution of Industry Sectors to GDPGlobal Financial Center IndexGDP ComparisonProgressive GrowthNew YorkLos AngelesChicagoBostonSan FranciscoTorontoMontreal
  9. 9. Premise9Despite its competitive mix of auto and public transport, Toronto suffers from the worstcommute times in North America.VancouverMontrealTorontoChicagoLos AngelesNew York212427323942Accumulation of particulate matter, sulfur, and nitrogendioxide in mg per cubic meter (mg/m³)Source: Toronto Board of TradeData Years: 2001 - 20045 minutesTorontoMontrealNew YorkVancouverChicagoSan FranciscoLos AngelesBostonSeattleDallasSource: Toronto Board of TradeData Years: 2006New YorkMontrealTorontoVancouverSan FranciscoBostonChicagoSeattleLos AngelesDallasNon-AutoAutoSource: Toronto Board of TradeData Year: 2008BostonChicagoTorontoSan FranciscoVancouverMontrealNew York 7,512,1001,050,800948,100638,100478,600344,796343,200Ridership per daySource: American Public Transportation AssociationData Year: First Quater, 2010I. Air PollutionII. Non-Auto vs. Auto Commute to work.IV. Metro RidershipVI. Commute to Work
  10. 10. Toronto Waterfront10“The people of Toronto deserve more than ur-ban sprawl and the congestion and pollution thatcomes with it.”– Jim BradleyMinister of Municipal Affairs and Housing100,0001 million2 million3 million4 million5 million6 million7 million8 million9million1850 1900 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030PopulationSUBURBSCITYEXPRESSWAYSBUILT1950’sSiteMetro LineLight Rail Line“Downtown Relief Line”ExpresswaysTransport HubRavinesValleySiteRavinesGreenbelt DesignatedZonesLike many North American cities, Toronto has grown away from its urban center and wa-terfront. A dense core and suburban periphery form a collection of nodes linked through aroad network and to a lesser degree by subway and commuter rail.
  11. 11. Premise11At the junction of the downtown, the periphery and the waterfront, the areas to the eastand west of downtown are missing links within the city’s network.Could the key to unlocking the potential of Toronto’s waterfront be to create a new, morepotent link between the core and the periphery?????Downtown
  12. 12. Can reducing the Gardiner’s footprint simultaneously remove an impediment to the development ofits surroundings and INCREASE downtown’s connection to its periphery?—Site potentialsToronto Waterfront12
  13. 13. DowntownPremise13
  14. 14. Toronto Waterfront14Removing the Gardiner as an obstacle is an important first step towards reorienting Toronto’sgrowth, but only a first step...
  15. 15. Premise15Of the available options to lessen the Gardiner’s impact, removing the upper deck offersboth the best integration of the New Gardiner with its surroundings and the greatestnumber of opportunities for navigating across it.PHOTOSHOPTOWERS1UNDERUNDER / ON / OVEROVER3321
  16. 16. GARDINER EXPRESSWAYLAKESHOREBOULEVARD5760 per hourTOTAL CAPACITY(12 Lanes)3600 per hourCAPACITY(8 Lanes)2160 per hourCAPACITY?Toronto Waterfront16The resulting reduction in road capacity—a reduction that will exacerbate an already con-gested road network—begs the question of what can step in to fill the void.
  17. 17. GARDINER EXPRESSWAYLAKESHOREBOULEVARD5760 per hourTOTAL CAPACITY(12 Lanes)3600 per hourCAPACITY(8 Lanes)StreecarSubwayTrainPremise17Removing the upper deck provides an opportunity to invest in multiple new modes oftransit into Toronto’s core.
  18. 18. Toronto Waterfront18The east end of the site is a crossroads of highways, the future relief subway line, com-muter rail, etc. By creating a new transit hub at their conjunction, these various transportmodes can be reorganized and amplified.SITE
  19. 19. Premise19Their conjunction becomes the focal point of a new node within Toronto.
  20. 20. Toronto Waterfront20
  21. 21. Premise21T TTLAKESHORE BLVDDONRIVERPARKWAYSTOUFFVILLELINELAKESHOREEASTLINERICHMONDLINE
  22. 22. Toronto Waterfront22Transport NodesInfrastructural BandsProgram BandsEast-West ConnectionsBATHHURSTSTREETBATHHURSTSTREETBATHHURSTSTREETSPADINAAVENUEJOHNSTREET/REESSTREETUNIVERSITYAVE/YORKSTREETBAYSTREETYONGESTREETJARVISSTREETSHERBOURNESTREETPARLIAMENTSTREETCHERRYSTREETDONPARKWAYCARLAWAVENUELESLIESTREETBATHHURSTSTREETBATHHURSTSTREETBATHHURSTSTREETSPADINAAVENUEJOHNSTREET/REESSTREETUNIVERSITYAVE/YORKSTREETBAYSTREETYONGESTREETJARVISSTREETSHERBOURNESTREETPARLIAMENTSTREETCHERRYSTREETDONPARKWAYCARLAWAVENUELESLIESTREET
  23. 23. DONVALLEYGARDINER EXPRESSWAYDONVALLEYGARDINER EXPRESSWAYDONVALLEYGARDINER EXPRESSWAYPremise23North-South ConnectionsCulture PointsConnectCultural Figures
  24. 24. Toronto Waterfront24HERITAGE MARKETLAKESHORE BLVD/METRO LINEPARK STRIPARTS DISTRICT
  25. 25. Premise25TRANSFERIUMICT BARCONFERENCEGATE
  26. 26. ST. LAWRENCE HALLDAVID CROMBIE PARKMILL STREET BREWERYDISTILLERY DISTRICTYOUNG CENTER FOR THEPERFORMING ARTSST. LAWRENCE CENTERFOR THE ARTSSONY PERFORMINGARTS CENTERDOMINIONPUBLICCOMMERCECOURTHOCKEYHALL OFFAMEST. LAWRENCENORTH MARKETST. LAWRENCEMARKETCANADA’SSUGAR BEACH(FUTURE)DON RIVERPARK / PANAM GAMES(FUTURE)WETLANDS(FUTURE)SHERBOURNEPARK(FUTURE)BAY ADELAIDECENTRECITY OFTORONTOARCHIVESCHURCH OF THEHOLY TRINITYOLD CITY HALLCANADIAN OPERACOMPANYROY THOMPSON HALLUNION STATIONAIR CANADA CENTERTORONTOISLANDFERRYREDPATH SUGARMUSEUMDUNDAS SQUAREST. MICHAEL’SHOSPITALCITY HALLToronto Waterfront26Cultural Figures
  27. 27. Premise27
  28. 28. TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTUREGRID LAYOUTWATERFRONT AREAGREEN INFRASTRUCTURETTTTTRANSPORTBLOCK LAYOUTWATERFRONT ZONEToronto Waterfront28Networks
  29. 29. GREEN INFRASTRUCTUREPROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONBUILDINGS PROPOSEDTTTPROPOSALPROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONPARKSPremise29
  30. 30. Toronto Waterfront30Masterplan
  31. 31. Premise31
  32. 32. Toronto Waterfront32
  33. 33. Transferium33——TRANSFERIUM
  34. 34. Toronto Waterfront34
  35. 35. Transferium35
  36. 36. Toronto Waterfront36TRANSFERIUM6000 CAR PARKING CAPACITYMIXED USEHTRANSPORT HUBWESTDON LANDS/PAN AM GAMES VILLAGEWETLANDSThe transferium clarifies the current infrastructure network, facilitating the removal of theGardiner by increasing modal use...
  37. 37. Transferium37....providing connections to Subway, GO Trains (Richmond, Stouffville and LakeshoreEast lines), Street car (along Queens Quay Boulevard) aswell as regular busLAKESHORE BLVDQUEENS QUAY BLVDGARDINERCHEERYSTCARLAWSTLESLIESTPARLIAMENTSTSHERBOURNESTJARVISSTYOUNGESTDONRIVERPARKWAYLAKESHORE BLVDQUEENS QUAY BLVDGARDINERCHEERYSTCARLAWSTLESLIESTPARLIAMENTSTSHERBOURNESTJARVISSTYOUNGESTDONRIVERPARKWAYLAKESHORE BLVDQUEENS QUAY BLVDGARDINERCHEERYSTCARLAWSTLESLIESTPARLIAMENTSTSHERBOURNESTJARVISSTYOUNGESTDONRIVERPARKWAYT TTTTROAD NETWORK SUBWAYSTREET CAR LINE BUS ROUTE
  38. 38. Toronto Waterfront38Transferium PlansLevel 0SubwayLevel 1Ground LevelLevel 2ParkingUPDOWNDOWNUP
  39. 39. Transferium39Level 7ConcourseLevel 8RetailTowerTRAIN CONNECTIONTRAMWAYTRAINCONVENTIONCENTERGYMTOBUSINESSCENTERTO PAN AM STATIONVISITORFACILITIESCONCOURSEWATERPARK&FERRYCONVENTIONCENTERCONVENTIONCENTERCONVENTIONCENTERCONVENTIONCENTERRETAIL
  40. 40. Toronto Waterfront40Towers
  41. 41. Transferium41OFFICESKY LOBBYCONFERENCERETAILPARKINGPARKINGCONCOURSECONCOURSERETAILHOTELSUBWAYGOTRAINSTREETCAROFFICE
  42. 42. SkylineToronto Waterfront42
  43. 43. Transferium43
  44. 44. Toronto Waterfront44PThe Don River Valley flows beneath the transferium, creating an environmental connec-tion to the surrounding areas.
  45. 45. Transferium45
  46. 46. Toronto Waterfront46
  47. 47. Transferium47
  48. 48. Toronto Waterfront48
  49. 49. Boulevard Mix Strip49——LAKESHORE BOULEVARD/MIX STRIP
  50. 50. Toronto Waterfront50The removal of the Gardiner enables creation a two sided street by developing the spaceof land between rail tracks and road structure.
  51. 51. Boulevard Mix Strip51
  52. 52. Toronto Waterfront52A new spine emerges, linking Downtown to future development andconnecting significant elements of the city.
  53. 53. Boulevard Mix Strip53Diagonal Barcelona Plan
  54. 54. Toronto Waterfront54Boardwalk Queens Quay BoulevardPEDESTRIAN LOCAL: Streetcar, 4 car lane road, Bicycle lanesSIDEWALK SIDEWALK4.5 1.5 3.1 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5BIKEWAYBIKEWAYSWALE LANE LANE LANE LANE LANE LANE LANE LANE LANE LANESUBWAY RIGHT OF WAYTYPICAL CONDITIONALONG BOULEVARDPLATFORMPLATFORMThe new Lakeshore Boulevard maintains a status as a main artery into the city, accomodatingeight lanes of traffic, along with bikelanes and public plazas along the treelined corridor.
  55. 55. Boulevard Mix Strip55Lakeshore BoulevardMETROPOLITAN: Subway, 8 car lane road, bicycle lanesSUBWAY LINERAILWAY TRACKS
  56. 56. Toronto Waterfront56Proposed Massings1. Existing Condition:Buildings Face Awayfrom Gardiner.2. Existing Condition:Buildings turn awayfrom Lakeshore Boul-evard, creating intimatecourtyards.3. Proposal:Mirror the current condi-tion, creating a new charac-ter to the Boulevard.4. The growth of thecurrent urban pochecreates pockets ofpublic space alongthe linear boulevard.
  57. 57. Boulevard Mix Strip57
  58. 58. Toronto Waterfront58
  59. 59. Boulevard Mix Strip59Tower PrinciplesTowers have been developed within the precinct development guidelines with a maxi-mum tower height of 120m. In order to encourage a mix use development, the tower hasbeen developed specifically to accomodate office, residential, and hotel requirements.RESIDENTIAL HOTELOFFICE++24-42m 24-42m 24-42m24-42m8-14m24-42m5-9m24-42m7mEXISTINGRAILGARDNER120m58m48m12mRAILBOULEVARD
  60. 60. Toronto Waterfront60
  61. 61. Arts District61——ARTS DISTRICT
  62. 62. Toronto Waterfront62OverviewExisiting Distillery DistrictICA&ESUBWAY
  63. 63. Arts District63Program Distribution
  64. 64. Toronto Waterfront64SHERBOURNESTJARVISSTPARLIAMENTSTCHERRYSTBAYVIEWAVEST. LAWRENCE HALLDAVID CROMBIE PARKMILL STREET BREWERYDISTILLERY DISTRICTYOUNG CENTER FOR THEPERFORMING ARTSST. LAWRENCE CENTERFOR THE ARTSPERFORMINGTS CENTERST. LAWRENCENORTH MARKETST. LAWRENCEMARKETCANADA’SSUGAR BEACH(FUTURE)DON RIVEPARK / PAAM GAME(FUTURESHERBOURNEPARK(FUTURE)REDPATH SUGARMUSEUMHistorically, the Distillery District stands in the location of the first settlements of Toron-to. A complex of different Distilleries, during the 1860’s it was one of the largest Whiskeydistilleries in the world. Now the area has been converted into an arts district.
  65. 65. Arts District65With a mix of cultural arts, galleries and performance arts studios and bars, the districtpromotes itself as an ‘European village’.By pushing Lake Shore Boulevard under, a pedestrian extension is provided with accessto the waterfront. The grid of the Distillery District is also extended South, retaining asimilar urban scale within the two zones.
  66. 66. Toronto Waterfront66ICA&E - Institute of Contemporary Arts and The Environment
  67. 67. Arts District67ICAESILO PARK ANDSLIPHEADVICTORY SOYAMILLS SILODAVID CROMBIE PARKTRINITY STREETBRIDGECHERRY STREETBRIDGEDON RIVER PARKEXISTINGDISTILLERYThe ICA&E museum provides a clear counterpoint to the Distillery District in theNorth of the zone. Access to these two destinations creates a series of clearly definedroutes through the site...
  68. 68. Toronto Waterfront68... at the centre a red glazed brick tunnel embedded within the railway berm with subway stop.
  69. 69. Arts District69
  70. 70. Toronto Waterfront70Section through Arts District
  71. 71. Arts District71
  72. 72. Toronto Waterfront72
  73. 73. Arts District73
  74. 74. Toronto Waterfront74
  75. 75. Arts District75120 METERS57 METERS34 METERS12 METERS120 METERS42 METERS24 METERS58 METERSProgram Density
  76. 76. Arts District75120 METERS57 METERS34 METERS12 METERS120 METERS42 METERS24 METERS58 METERSProgram Density
  77. 77. Toronto Waterfront76
  78. 78. Park Strip77——PARK STRIP
  79. 79. Toronto Waterfront78Overview
  80. 80. Park Strip79
  81. 81. Toronto Waterfront80Link Existing Park Bands
  82. 82. Park Strip81Gardiner is left as a viewing post.
  83. 83. Toronto Waterfront82Boardwalk Queens Quay BoulevardA fragment of the Gardiner is kept, providing an elevated pedestrian plat-form.
  84. 84. Park Strip83Lakeshore BoulevardGardiner bridge structureSUBWAY LINERAILWAY TRACKS
  85. 85. Toronto Waterfront84
  86. 86. Heritage Market85——HERITAGE/MARKET
  87. 87. Toronto Waterfront86Overview
  88. 88. Heritage Market87
  89. 89. Toronto Waterfront88The Heritage Market links two key establishments associated with Toron-to’s food production. St Lawrence market established in 1845 is one ofonly two major markets still operating within Toronto. The Redpath SugarFactory located on the waterfront still operates, representing a link to To-YORKSTBAYSTYONGESTSHERBOURNESTJARVISSTST. LAWRENCE HALLDST. LAWRENCE CENTERFOR THE ARTSSONY PERFORMINGARTS CENTERDOMINIONPUBLICCOMMERCECOURTHOCKEYHALL OFFAMEST. LAWRENCENORTH MARKETST. LAWRENCEMARKETCANADA’SSUGAR BEACH(FUTURE)SHERP(FBAY ADELAIDECENTRECITY OFTORONTOARCHIVESCHURCH OF THEHOLY TRINITYOLD CITY HALLCANADIAN OPERACOMPANYROY THOMPSON HALLUNION STATIONAIR CANADA CENTERTORONTOISLANDFERRYREDPATH SUGARMUSEUMCITY HALL
  90. 90. Heritage Market89ronto’s industrial history.A series of outdoor markets, organic in their growth provide a continuouslink between the two buildings.These informal markets suggest the potential of the Heritage Market tobecome a larger urban phenomena, “leaking” into its surrounding context.+ + =Portobello Market Camden Market Toronto HeritageMarketInformal MarketOutgrowthToronto Heritage Market with po-tential informal market outgrowth
  91. 91. Toronto Waterfront90Market Growth
  92. 92. Heritage Market91Market Bridge Connection
  93. 93. Toronto Waterfront92
  94. 94. Heritage Market93
  95. 95. Toronto Waterfront94View from Market Bridge
  96. 96. Heritage Market95A continuous surface of‘sugar-like’glazed ceramic tiles provides a mate-rial link between the two sites.
  97. 97. Toronto Waterfront96
  98. 98. Creative City97——CREATIVE CITY
  99. 99. “We must put creativity at the heart of Toronto’s economicdevelopment strategy.” -Mayor David MillerMayor David MillerToronto Waterfront98600055005000450040003500300025002000150010005002006200720082009#ofPatentsYearSource: Toronto Board of TradeInnovation Index: Annual Registered PatentsNew YorkLos AngelesChicagoBostonSan FranciscoTorontoMontreal
  100. 100. Creative City99Can Creative City become a new downtown?
  101. 101. TORONTO FILM STUDIOSCFC CANADIANFILM CENTERWATERFRONT+CBDLOWER DON LANDSWEST DON LANDSPAN AM GAMES 2015LAKE ONTARIO PARKPORTLANDSMARS DISCOVERY DISTRICTYORK UNIVERSITYINNOVATION SYNERGYCENTRE MARKHAMTORONTO VENTUREGROUPIBMDOWNSVIEW AIRPORTDOWNSVIEW AIRPORTLESTER B. PEARSON AIRPORTUNIVERSITY OF TORONTOSCARBOROUGH CAMPUSToronto Waterfront100Can we provide a new centre, providing a link between Toronto’s dis-parate zones of creativity?
  102. 102. Creative City101Scale ComparisonSIZE COMPARISONLocus Point2.55 km2Baltimore349.9 km2651 154 inh0.73%255 354 inh/km2 harbourDublin Docklands5.20 km2Dublin114.9 km2495 781 inh4.56 %95 343 inh/km2 harbourLeith Docks1.70 km2Edingburgh264 km2435 790 inh0.64 %256 347 inh/km2 harbourSydhavnen1.48 km2Copenhagen88 km2502 362 inh1.68 %339 434 inh/km2 harbourHafen City1.40 km2Hamburg755.2 km21 738 483 inh0.18 %1 241 774 inh/km2 harbourTORONTO PORT.75 km2TORONTO630 km22 503 281 inh0.54 %482 064 inh/km2 harbourRuoholahti0.58 km2Helsinki186 km2559 330 inh0.31 %948 016 inh/km2 harbourMinato Mirai 211.27 km2Yokohama437.4 km23 577 436 inh0.29 %2 816 878 inh/km2 harbourSalford Quays1.21 km2Manchester116 km2437 000 inh1.04 %361 157 inh/km2 harbourBorneo Sporenburg1.21 km2Amsterdam130 km2742 951 inh0.93 %613 232 inh/km2 harbourForum 20040.80 km2Barcelona100.4 km21 593 073 hab0.80 %1 973 182 inh/km2 harbourKop van Zuid0.90 km2Rotterdam304.2 km2588 500 inh0.30 %653 889 inh/km2 harbourLa Defense0.48 km2Paris125.4 km2589 141 inhVictoria Harbour0.44 km2Hong Kong1 103 km27 012 738 inh0.04 %15 678 831 inh/km2 harbourCanary Wharf0.36 km2London1 579 km27 429 200 inh0.02 %20 614 463 inh/km2 harbour
  103. 103. 12ResidentialMixLeisureCulture/EducationCommercialOfficeToronto Waterfront102Program Clarity
  104. 104. Creative City103Program distribution
  105. 105. Toronto Waterfront104MODELSHOT
  106. 106. Creative City105
  107. 107. Toronto Waterfront106A Revisiting of the Park Olmstead Hinge
  108. 108. Creative City107
  109. 109. Toronto Waterfront108
  110. 110. Appendix109——APPENDIX
  111. 111. Toronto Waterfront110Tower Options
  112. 112. Premise111111
  113. 113. Toronto Waterfront112Transport: Existing (2004-2008) traffic volumesThe Gardiner currently operates at near-capacity levels in thewestbound direction during the AM peak hour. The next down-town exit from the Don Valley Parkway, Eastern Avenue/Rich-mond Street, is currently over-capacity and cannot accommodatea shift in vehicle distribution. Additionally, the Gardiner is a majorbarrier to north-south movement, especially for pedestrians andcyclists.CherryParliamentSherbourneJarvisDonRoadwayGardiner ExpresswayLake Shore BoulevardRichmondAdelaide2,072 1,8002,390 6,000984 1,8002,854 6,00030816,0005451,8003,815 6,000demand capacity495 1,8005341,8002,6406,0007961,8004,2136,0003461,8002,2534,0001,8184,0001,8984,0009884,0007621,8002,2494,0004501,8004311,8009041,8008111,8004959002909003511,8004501,8001511,8003851,800Existing AM Peak Hour Volumes1,7864,0008144,000
  114. 114. Appendix113Transport: Estimated future (2031) traffic volumesThe future development of the Lower Don Lands, West DonLands and Port Lands will add significant east-west vehiculartraffic, especially to Lake Shore Boulevard. The Gardiner is notfully at-capacity between Jarvis and Don Valley Parkway, indicat-ing potential to reduce capacity by replacing the structure with anat-grade boulevard.CherryParliamentSherbourneJarvisDonRoadwayGardiner ExpresswayLake Shore BoulevardRichmondAdelaideFuture AM Peak Hour Volumes2,279 1,8003,345 6,0001,768 1,8003,401 6,0003,344 6,0001,997 1,8004,460 6,000demand capacity2,099 1,8001,233 1,8003,6596,0008981,8004,8666,0006081,8002,3834,0001,9534,0007894,0007304,0009831,8001,8411,8006061,8001,0341,8002031,8008201,8002071,8007721,8006061,8005401,8004271,8002,3804,0002,4854,0001,6954,000
  115. 115. Toronto Waterfront114Transport: Estimated road and transit demand for fullbuild-out of proposed developmentThe reduction in road capacity, and a significant increase in transitcapacity, bicycle/pedestrian capacity, and transit-oriented develop-ment will help realize a considerable mode shift away from autotravel along the corridor. The Transferium is the catalyst for thisshift, encouraging drivers to leave their cars at home or park andtake transit from this multimodal hub.0m 500mNJarvisStreetSherbourneStreetCherryStreetDonRoadwayParliamentStreetDowntown Relief LineGo TrainQueens Quay Street Car2,2791,8003,9003,90016,50016,50014,40014,400Key Traffic Volumes -Proposed DevelopmentVehiclesSubwayGo TrainStreet CarDemandCapacity5- and 10- minutewalking radii9831,8002,8694,0006981,8004741,8003,6003,6003,6003,60012,96014,4003,6444,0001,3673,6001,0003,6004271,8005401,8003,9003,90018141,8007911,8001,6481,8003921,8001,7441,8003881,8001,6001,8007911,800
  116. 116. Appendix115Transport: Regional ConnectivityThe proposed Transferium provides regional vehicular and transitaccess via the Don Valley Parkway and potential Go Train stop.Local transit connectivity is improved via the Downtown Reliefline and connection to the Queens Quay streetcar.DonValleyParkway401400427409Gardiner ExpresswayMultimodal Transit HubMap data © 2010 GoogleLegendGardiner Study AreaGo TrainSubway/RT & StationsProposed Subway/RT
  117. 117. Toronto Waterfront116Transport: Possible vehicular movementsTraffic operations along the new boulevard, allowing improvednorth-south access across Lake Shore Boulevard to and from thewaterfront via at-grade intersections.0m 500mNJarvisStreetSherbourneStreetCherryStreetDonRoadwayParliamentStreetAll Vehicle MovementsSignalized IntersectionLake Shore BoulevardTurning Traffic
  118. 118. Appendix117EnvironmentThe plan has been developed with a strong focus on environmen-tal sustainability, fully implementing Waterfront Toronto’s sustain-ability framework and facilitating achievement of Waterfront’sClimate Positive targets The excavation spine north of LakeshoreDrive will enable organization of sustainable infrastructurearound a common utility corridor potentially serving all of theWaterfront projects. An autonomous stormwater managementand graywater/rainwater recycling system will exploit and aug-ment the wetlands function of the reconstructed Don Riverestuary. The plan includes a comprehensive portfolio of renewableenergy generation systems, with the transferium area itself as a keyenergy production hub. Environmental quality will be addressedwith waterfront restoration, air quality improvements and carbonemissions reductions from traffic decongestion, and expandedstreet tree cover.500m 1,000mNCommon Utility CorridorConstructed parallel to the subway system excavations the utility corridor willemcompass potable water, residual sewer, electricity, natural gas, hot/chilledwater, automated waste collection, and communications. It is consolidated foreasy servicing, performance tracking and operational efficiency. Built programis connected to utility servicing areas.utility servicing hubprimary utility corridor (all services)potable water main - parallel and integrated, but avoids riverdistribution systemPotable Water Sewage CommunicationsAWCS Hot and Chilled WaterElectricityNatural GasUtility Corridor SchematicUtilities
  119. 119. Toronto Waterfront118500m 1,000mNEnvironmental QualityIn addition to parks and green spaces, the proposed development strategycontemplates substantial improvement to existing environmental quality.transport decongestion, street-greening -> improved air quality on major corridors,GHG credits from decongestionextensive brownfield restorationcontinuous waterfront that is unimpended by infrastructureDon River Mouth estuary integrated with urban water management systems forfunctioning, integrated wetlandstransit-oriented planning development paralleled with building-oriented landformingand greeningTransport De-congestion Wetland ConversionBrownfield RestorationUrban Waterfront Wildlife Habitat Recreation Development
  120. 120. Appendix119500m 1,000mNEnergy - Supply SideSite-integrated alternative energy infrastructure will include a comprehensive portfolio ofrenewables sources that will be designed to comply with Waterfront Toronto renewablestargets.common utility corridor for energy transmission and distributiondistrict-scale ground-source heat pump infrastructure under sidewalksto serve adjacent buildingspotential co-generation site (including the Transferium)potential anaerobic digestion sitepotential solar thermal ground source heat storagedrawing from surrounding building solar thermaldistributed rooftop solar PV and solar thermal hot watersolar thermal roadscooling loop for heat rejection and chilled watersmall wind turbines along waterfrontGround Heat StorageAnaerobic Digester(to Power Local BusNetwork)Distributed Solar PVand Thermal(Building Scale)Wind Power(Along Waterfront toDrive Pumps)District CogenerationPlantsCooling Loop(for CogenerationPlant Heat Rejection)Solar Thermal Road Geothermal HeatPump(Building Scale)
  121. 121. Toronto Waterfront120500m 1,000mNEnergy - Demand SideEnergy demand reduction is primarily taken into account on the building scale.Various energy reduction strategies, seen below, will be encouraged with anyand every new building development within the site area. These strategiesinclude envelope optimization, HVAC, lighting, energy star equipment and soon.UnderfloorventilationHigh performanceglazingAppropriatebuildingorientationEnergyStarequipmentNaturalventilationEfficientlightingDaylightpenetrationGreenroofReflectiveroofLight coloredpaving matl.ShadedwalkwaysOptimizedbuildingshading
  122. 122. Appendix121500m 1,000mNRainwater Harvesting / Graywater RecyclingRainwater/graywater harvesting, treatment and storage in large building anddistrict scale systems will allow the development to exist autonomously fromToronto’s city sewage system as well as conserve water resources.curbside and median swale system removes excess after building/area harvestingrecycled graywater may be transported to areas of greater need by the common utility corridorpurple pipe system for the Transferium and industrial/residential areas - district scale graywaterrainwater harvested off green-roofs, parks, etc. and transported to building or district scale treatment systemsdistrict scale treatment (purple pipe system suitable for lower rise, industrial, residential areaslarge residential & commercial buildings will have closed-loop graywater treatment systemsBuilding GraywaterRecyclingRainwater Harvesting Industrial/ResidentialGraywater (PurplePipe) System
  123. 123. Toronto Waterfront122500m 1,000mNStormwaterA bioswale system along Lakeshore Drive (in addition to median swale on eachpedestrian side) will transport harvested stormwater, not otherwise treated andrecycled for use at the block/bulding scale, to the Don River estuary. Thedevelopment will be self-contained with respect to stormwater management.curbside and median swale system - Lakeshore Drive to Don River mouthexcess stormwater may be transported by common utility corridor in extreme storm conditionsfeeder street swale systemsstormwater harvested off green-roofs, parks, etc.Porous PaversGreen RoofsBioswalesWetlands
  124. 124. Appendix123500m 1,000mNWaste & MaterialsWaste and materials management will reduce the development’s ecologicalfootprint and increase the rate of landfill diversion.utility servicing hub - anaerobic digestor & recycling facilitiesexplore potential for use of carbon absorbing concrete for Lakeshore Drivealso, recycled aggregate from the demolished Gardiner viaduct can be used in constructionporous pavers are to used wherever possiblecentral pipeline for automated waste collection system (AWCS) along utility corridor - vacuum/pressurelocal waste transport system (AWCS)Recycled Highway Roadbed Aggregate Porous PaversPipe NetworkAnaerobic Digester(Connects to AWCS andSewage Line)Carbon AbsorbingConcreteAutomated Waste Collection System (AWCS)
  125. 125. Toronto Waterfront124PROPOSED TREE ON LAKE SHORE BOULEVARDQuercus robur ‘Fastigiata’‘Fastigiata’ English OakUpright columnar tree;50’–60’ high and 10’-16’ wide;trees are tolerant to urban conditions, air pollution, salt spray, compacted soil and are drought resistant;trees are planted in linear continuous tree trench.Avenue J.F. Kennedy - Plateau du Kirchberg - Luxembourg(Source : BING MAPS)Quercus robur ‘Fastigiata’
  126. 126. Appendix125PROPOSED GROUND COVER ON LAKE SHORE BOULEVARD AND MEDIANTrifolium repensWhite cloverWhite clover terra-seeding - ecological approachPrecedent work – Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal – 3m wide continuous tree trench slightly raised to emphasize visual presence of green. The traffic median is covered with white clover terra-seeded asground cover on René-Lévesque Boulevard in front of the Canadian Centre of Architecture – (Completed in 2003 - CCAP) (Photo 2010)Continuous tree trench in front of the CCA - René-Lévesque Boulevard - Montreal(Source : CLAUDE CORMIER)Trifolium repens
  127. 127. Toronto Waterfront126Urban DesignThe plan endeavors to create a new eastern annex and center forDowntown Toronto. All development will be intensely mixeduse, with a dynamic commercial, cultural, and residential spinealong Lakeshore Drive. New development along the spine willoccur at a net average Floor Area Ratio in excess of 7.1 and withhousing density greater than 400 units/ha. The transferium willserve as the anchor for the spine, providing multimodal access tothe area and to Downtown as well providing a standalone em-ployment, cultural and entertainment destination. It will beaugmented by an adjacent commercial district. North and southof the spine, in the Creative City area, lower intensity develop-ment on rehabilitated brownfields sites will focus on R&D andtechnology-oriented employment with associated housing,schools, local retail, and a major university research center.500m 1,000mN12345679121314816172227321823283319202530342429351 Nth of Lakeshore A2 Nth of Lakeshore B/Subway3 Nth of Lakeshore C4 Nth of Queen’s Quay A5 Nth of Queen’s Quay B/Subway6 Nth of Lakeshore D7 Transferium - Subway8 North Station - Go Train9 South Station - Trolley/LRT12 Environmental/Utility13 West Keating North/West14 West Keating North/East16 Don River West/Utility17 Creative City CBD 118 Creative City Mixed-Use Strip W19 Creative City Research Campus20 Creative City Residential SW22 Creative City CBD 223 Creative City Mixed-Use Strip HTC24 Creative City HTC N25 Creative City HTC S27 Creative City CBD 328 Creative City Mixed-Use Strip Central29 Creative City Residential N Central-E30 Creative City Residential S Central32 Creative City CBD 433 Creative City Mixed-Use Strip E34 Light Industrial35 Conference Center
  128. 128. Appendix127Innovative Design CompetitionMaster Plan Summary TableOMA*AMOOffice Retail Residential Other Open Space Other DataBlock #BlockDescription Block TypeSiteAreaMaxBlockHeightAvgBlockHeightMaxStoreys Total GFA Office %OfficeGFA* Retail %RetailGFA* Res. %Res.GFA* Other %OtherGFA*OpenSpace %OpenSpacePhase#Res.UnitsRes.Population JobsRetail Space/pop+job Noteshs m m floors m2 % m2 % m2 % m2 % m2 % m21 Nth of Lakeshore A - W of Jarvis mixed-use 1.7 120 44 30 139,296 0% - 2% 2,786 95% 132,331 3% 4,179 10% 1,741 1 881 1,718 67 1.59 Lakeshore to berm2 Nth of Lakeshore B - Jarvis to Parliament mixed-use 1.7 120 72 30 233,338 60% 140,003 10% 23,334 25% 58,335 5% 11,667 10% 1,667 1 388 757 2,775 7.21 Lakeshore to berm, Subway Station3 Nth of Lakeshore C - Parliament to Sherbourne mixed-use 1.8 120 80 30 254,758 40% 101,903 10% 25,476 45% 114,641 5% 12,738 10% 1,820 1 763 1,488 2,160 7.67 Lakeshore to berm4 Nth of Queens Quay A - Sherbourne-Cherry Plinth W mixed-use 1.6 60 24 15 124,656 0% - 3% 3,740 85% 105,958 12% 14,959 20% 3,116 2 705 1,375 160 2.52 Plinth/Distillery Transition5 Nth of Queens Quay B - Sherbourne-Cherry Plinth E mixed-use 2.3 60 36 15 183,400 0% - 3% 5,502 85% 155,890 12% 22,008 20% 4,585 2 1,038 2,024 235 2.51 Plinth/Distillery Transition, Subway Station6 Nth of Lakeshore D - East of Cherry mixed-use 1.7 120 56 30 173,970 0% - 2% 3,479 95% 165,272 3% 5,219 10% 1,740 2 1,101 2,147 84 1.59 Lakeshore to berm7 Transferium mixed-use 4.9 200 180 40 587,688 30% 176,306 10% 58,769 10% 58,769 50% 293,844 0% - 3 391 762 4,200 13.95 Subway Station, Parking, Towers Above8 North Station utility 0.7 20 4 4 13,798 0% - 2% 276 - 98% 13,522 50% 3,450 3 - - 105 2.72 Go-train9 South Station mixed-use 0.8 60 12 15 50,556 0% - 2% 1,011 30% 15,167 68% 34,378 50% 4,213 3 101 197 271 2.22 Trolley Station10 Transferium Frontage Parcels - East open space 0.5 - - - - 0% - - - 100% - 100% 5,180 3 - - - -11 Don River Parkway Ramp Medians open space 0.4 - - - - 0% - - - 100% - 100% 3,715 3 - - - -12 Environmental Infrastructure utility 1.6 8 4 2 7,752 0% - 100% 7,752 3 - 58 - Environmental Infrastructure, Utilities13 Nth of Queens Quay B - West Keating North W mixed-use 2.0 80 24 20 122,670 2% 2,453 95% 116,537 3% 3,680 15% 3,067 4 776 1,513 59 1.59 Overlaps with West Keating/LDL precinct14 Nth of Queens Quay C - West Keating North E mixed-use, utility 2.6 80 32 20 155,892 0% - 2% 3,118 90% 140,303 8% 12,471 15% 3,897 4 934 1,821 133 1.63 Overlaps with West Keating/LDL precinct15 Medians - Lakeshore open space 0.8 - 0% 0% - 0% - 100% - 100% 8,001 4 - - - -16 Don River - West Bank & Medians utility, open space 3.9 19,526 0% 0% - 0% - 100% 19,526 60% 23,431 4 - - 146 - Includes Environmental Infrastructure17 Creative City - CBD 1 (first ring) mixed-use 1.6 150 32 37 161,650 35% 56,578 3% 4,850 57% 92,141 5% 8,083 10% 1,617 5 613 1,195 799 2.51 NE of Transferium, Westmost18 Creative City - Mixed-Use Strip W mixed-use 3.7 150 48 37 221,616 35% 77,566 5% 11,081 55% 121,889 5% 11,081 10% 3,694 5 812 1,583 887 4.76 East of Transferium along Lakeshore19 Creative City - Research Campus institutional 7.7 20 20 5 115,106 0% 1% 1,151 20% 23,021 79% 90,933 20% 15,347 5 153 298 697 1.17 University-affiliated research/tech campus20 Creative City - Residential SW mixed-use 10.5 60 48 15 315,708 0% 2% 6,314 95% 299,923 3% 9,471 25% 26,309 5 1,998 3,896 152 1.59 SE on Ship Channel21 Creative City - Boulevard Medians W open space 0.4 - 100% 4,206 5 - - - -22 Creative City - CBD 2 (second ring) mixed-use 3.5 142 96 35 314,748 35% 110,162 3% 9,442 57% 179,406 5% 15,737 10% 3,497 6 1,195 2,330 1,555 2.51 NE of Transferium, East23 Creative City - Mixed-Use Strip HTC mixed-use 3.5 150 44 37 212,676 35% 74,437 5% 10,634 55% 116,972 5% 10,634 10% 3,545 6 779 1,519 851 4.76 High Tech Corridor, Along Lakeshore24 Creative City - HTC N R&D/labtech 7.8 60 36 15 233,418 70% 163,393 1% 2,334 25% 58,355 4% 9,337 25% 19,452 6 388 757 1,076 1.29 Tech Campus, North of Corridor25 Creative City - HTC S R&D/labtech 10.2 60 36 15 254,018 70% 177,812 1% 2,540 25% 63,504 4% 10,161 25% 25,402 6 423 825 1,171 1.29 Tech Campus, South of Corridor to Channel26 Creative City - Boulevard Medians HTC open space 0.4 100% 3,583 6 - - - -27 Creative City - CBD 3 (third ring) mixed-use 5.0 134 124 33 400,112 35% 140,039 3% 12,003 57% 228,064 5% 20,006 10% 5,001 7 1,519 2,962 1,977 2.51 NE of Transferium, Further East28 Creative City - Mixed-Use Strip Central mixed-use 4.3 150 52 37 259,134 35% 90,697 5% 12,957 55% 142,524 5% 12,957 10% 4,319 7 949 1,851 1,037 4.76 East of High Tech Corridor, Along Lakeshore29 Creative City - Residential N Central, E mixed-use 10.6 60 48 15 317,379 0% - 2% 6,348 95% 301,510 3% 9,521 25% 26,448 7 2,008 3,916 152 1.59 NE, East of Tech Campus30 Creative City - Residential S Central mixed-use 9.4 60 40 15 281,247 0% - 2% 5,625 95% 267,185 3% 8,437 25% 23,437 7 1,780 3,471 135 1.59 SE on Ship Channel, West of Light Industrial31 Creative City - Boulevard Medians Central open space 0.4 60 40 15 13,203 100% 4,401 7 - - - -32 Creative City - CBD 4 (fourth ring) mixed-use 4.1 126 88 31 289,814 35% 101,435 3% 8,694 57% 165,194 5% 14,491 10% 4,140 8 1,100 2,145 2.51 NE of Transferium, Easternmost33 Creative City - Mixed-Use Strip E mixed-use 4.3 150 52 37 259,638 35% 90,873 5% 12,982 55% 142,801 5% 12,982 10% 4,327 8 951 1,854 4.76 Eastern Extent of Site, Along Lakeshore34 Creative City - Light Industrial light industrial 20.7 20 20 5 124,463 95% 118,240 1% 1,245 0% - 4% 4,979 40% 82,976 8 - - 1.67 Includes Environmental Infrastructure35 Creative City - Conference Center institutional 3.1 20 16 5 61,586 0% - 1% 616 0% - 99% 60,970 30% 9,238 8 - - 1.35 NE corner of site36 Creative City - Boulevard Medians E open space 0.6 100% 5,967 8 - - -140.9 5,902,815 1,619,443 238,759 3,265,688 765,721 346,528 21,746 42,405 20,942 3.18 38% commercial, 54% tech/R&D, 8% industrial* GFA calculations include structured parking associated with the requisite program.
  129. 129. Toronto Waterfront128EconomicsThe plan presents a transformative but achievable vision for thesite, creating a new western hub for Toronto with 21,000 new jobsfocused on technology and clean energy R&D and homes for42,000 residents. Impact fees and future tax revenue from intensedevelopment above and beside the transferium, subway excava-tion, and Gardiner will substantially offset infrastructure costs.Phased development from 2016 to 2065 is assumed to occuralongside other Waterfront Toronto projects, with commercialand residential development occurring at annual absorption ratescomparable to the peak forecasted 2011 to 2015 absorption forother Waterfront Toronto projects together – approximately50,000 commercial m2/year and 1,000 housing units/yr. Projectedcommercial and residential absorption will be limited by phasinguntil Lower Don Lands reaches buildout in 2046.60,000 GFA m2/yr50,000 al Absorption‐G40,000 Commercia30,000 20,000 ‐10,000 ‐2011‐2015 2016‐2020 2021‐2025 2026‐2030 2031‐2035 2036‐2040 2041‐2045 2046‐2050 2051‐2060 2061‐2065East Bay Front West Don Lands Lower Don Lands Lakeshore ‐ Phase 1 Transferium ‐ Phase 3Creative City ‐ Phase 5 Creative City ‐ Phase 6 Creative City ‐ Phase 7 Creative City ‐ Phase 8
  130. 130. Appendix1291,400  ‐Units/yr1 0001,200 ntial Absorption800 1,000 Reside600 400 ‐200 2011‐2015 2016‐2020 2021‐2025 2026‐2030 2031‐2035 2036‐2040 2041‐2045 2046‐2050 2051‐2060 2061‐2065East Bay Front West Don Lands Lower Don Lands Lakeshore ‐ Phase 1 Lakeshore ‐ Phase 2 Transferium ‐ Phase 3Lakeshore ‐ Phase 4 Creative City ‐ Phase 5 Creative City ‐ Phase 6 Creative City ‐ Phase 7 Creative City ‐ Phase 8
  131. 131. Appendix1291,400  ‐Units/yr1 0001,200 ntial Absorption800 1,000 Reside600 400 ‐200 2011‐2015 2016‐2020 2021‐2025 2026‐2030 2031‐2035 2036‐2040 2041‐2045 2046‐2050 2051‐2060 2061‐2065East Bay Front West Don Lands Lower Don Lands Lakeshore ‐ Phase 1 Lakeshore ‐ Phase 2 Transferium ‐ Phase 3Lakeshore ‐ Phase 4 Creative City ‐ Phase 5 Creative City ‐ Phase 6 Creative City ‐ Phase 7 Creative City ‐ Phase 8
  132. 132. Appendix1317 008.00 Area Ratio6.00 7.00 geNet Floor 5.00 Averag4.00 2.003.00 1.00 2.00 ‐Lakeshore+Transferium Creative City
  133. 133. Toronto Waterfront132450 its/ha350400 sidential  Uni300 350 Res200 250 150 50 100 ‐Lakeshore+Transferium Creative City
  134. 134. Appendix13335,000 Persons28,603 25,000 30,000 20,000 12,843 15,000 10,488 10,000 959 5,820 4,634 5,000 ‐Lakeshore Transferium Creative CityJobs Population

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