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Is change management tactical or strategic v6

Are you transforming your organization to outperform competition? Of course. What will make the difference between succeeding and failing? Between succeeding a lot or a little? You know the answers already. In this presentation, for the first time, I discuss the Outperform Model in the context of the role of change management.

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Is change management tactical or strategic v6

  1. 1. Is Change Management Strategic orTactical? May 5th 2014 Gail Severini Managing Director, Symphini Change Management Inc.
  2. 2. “Strategy without tactics is the slowest route to victory. Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat.” ―Sun Tzu, The Art of War 2
  3. 3. 3 Agenda: 1. Getting perspective: “zoom out” to “zoom in” 2. What does it take to transform an organization? • The Outperform Model 3. Where is Change Management? • One perspective: the world according to ACMP • A second look at the Outperform Model 4. Tactical or Strategic — Characteristics 5. Application: let’s look at CRM 6. Survey says? Strategic or Tactical?
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  10. 10. Zoom out to: “What does it take to TRANSFORM an organization?” Then we can see where Change Management fits. 10
  11. 11. © Gail Severini, Symphini Change Management Inc., 201411 What does it take to transform an organization? Where is Strategy?Where is Change Management? Ongoing Operations RealizationStrategyBoard ExecutionC-SuiteCulture The “Outperform” Model
  12. 12. © Gail Severini, Symphini Change Management Inc., 201412 BTW: specific attributes of the components Ongoing Operations Realization Follow Through Agile Strategy Engaged Board Execution Engine Engaged C-Suite Agile Culture The “Outperform” Model
  13. 13. OUTPERFORM Working on any of these components will improve results ... The secret is … [and] and, sub-optimization of any one of them will hinder your ability to outperform. 13
  14. 14. So where is Change Management? 14
  15. 15. 2012 definition of Change Management: “The application of knowledge, skills, abilities, methodologies, processes, tools, and techniques to transition an individual or group from a current state to a desired future state, such that the desired outcomes and/or business objectives are achieved.” 15
  16. 16. © Gail Severini, Symphini Change Management Inc., 201416 So where is Execution? Ongoing Operations Realization Follow Through Agile Strategy Engaged Board Execution Engine Engaged C-Suite Agile Culture The “Outperform” Model
  17. 17. 17 Project Management Change Management Business Analysis Lean / Six Sigma Stakeholder Management Strategic Clarity Communications Training Solution Design Case for Change Organizational Alignment Readiness Preparation Metrics Tracking & Course Corrections Inside the Execution Engine Representative disciplines and activities.
  18. 18. 18 Project Management Change Management Business Analysis Lean / Six Sigma Stakeholder Management Strategic Clarity Communications Training Solution Design Case for Change Organizational Alignment Readiness Preparation Metrics Tracking & Course Corrections You are here Inside the Execution Engine Representative disciplines and activities.
  19. 19. What does that look like? 19
  20. 20. The world according to ACMP 20 “The Standard” Table of Contents Draft Jan 2014 (con’t) 5. Change Management Process 5.1 Evaluate Change Impact and Organizational Readiness 5.2 Formulate Change Management Strategy 5.3 Develop the Change Management Plan 5.4 Execute the Change Management Plan 5.5 Close the project, transfer ownership, release resources
  21. 21. Chapter 5. Change Management Process (Con’d) 5.1 Evaluate Change Impact and Organizational Readiness, eg: • Define Vision of Future State, Goals, Success Criteria • Identify Stakeholders and Sponsors • Assess degree of change, organization culture, capacity • Define communications and learning needs • Assess risks 21
  22. 22. Chapter 5. Change Management Process (Con’d) 5.2 Formulate Change Management Strategy • Sponsorship • Stakeholder Engagement • Learning and Development • Change Risk Mitigation • Measurement and Benefits Realization • Transition • Sustainability 22
  23. 23. Chapter 5. Change Management Process (Con’d) 5.3 Develop the Change Management Plan • Resource Plan • Sponsorship Plan • Stakeholder Plan • Stakeholder Engagement Plan • Learning and Development Plan • Change Risk Mitigation Plan • Measurement and Benefits Realization Plan • Transition Plan • Sustainability Plan • Integrate Change Management and Project Management Plans • Develop Feedback Mechanisms to Monitor Performance To Plans 23
  24. 24. Chapter 5. Change Management Process (Con’d) 5.4 Execute the Change Management Plan • Execute Resource Plan • Execute Communications Plan • Execute Sponsorship Plan • Execute Stakeholder Plan • Execute Stakeholder Engagement Plan • Execute Learning and Development Plan • Execute Change Risk Mitigation Plan • Execute Measurement and Benefits Realization Plan • Execute Transition Plan • Execute Sustainability Plan • Close the Change Management Effort – Lessons Learned 24
  25. 25. Chapter 5. Change Management Process (Con’d) 5.5 Close the project, transfer ownership, release resources 25
  26. 26. A note of caution The ACMP “Standard” takes a very “per project” perspective, i.e. this is only one project. Of course in the average organization there are many such projects happening concurrently. In mature organizations this “portfolio” of change is also managed. 26
  27. 27. © Gail Severini, Symphini Change Management Inc., 201427 Ongoing Operations Realization Follow Through Agile Strategy Engaged Board Execution Engine Engaged C-Suite Agile Culture Managing organizational change for transformation
  28. 28. © Gail Severini, Symphini Change Management Inc., 201428 Ongoing Operations Realization Follow Through Agile Strategy Engaged Board Execution Engine Engaged C-Suite Agile Culture … and you are here Oversight Long Termism Sponsorship Commitment & Prioritization Values, beliefs Competencies Org Structure Compensation Vision, Alignment Case for Change Accountability Transparency
  29. 29. Tactical: Strategic: • Incremental, eg. modest improvements • Emergent, eg. trajectory is sketched but course corrections are expected • Foreseeable and predictable • Highly ambiguous and dynamic • Project-specific • Enterprise-wide. Portfolio and Program driven • Minor or no minor culture shift • Major culture impact • Single silo • Cross-functional dependency • Short term (< 1 year) • Multi-year (eg 3-5 years) 29 Tactical or Strategic — Characteristics
  30. 30.    Tactical Big Tactical Strategic Another way of thinking aboutTactical & Strategic 30
  31. 31. Let’s look at a case
  32. 32. Strategic Objectives: • Identify leads • Target marketing • Deepen relationships with profitable customers (cross sell / market) • Increase customer retention through improved customer service • Integrate with supply chain (purchase orders, invoicing, inventory, etc) Customer Relationship Management (CRM) 32
  33. 33. Implementation: 1. CRM review, selection and vendor contracting 2. CRM system installation and customization 3. Data migration 4. Business Process Re-engineering 5. Organization Alignment (culture shift, organization design, compensation plan review) 6. Training and support Customer Relationship Management (CRM) 33
  34. 34. Who is involved in a CRM project? CEO Operations Call Center Marketing Sales IT Finance 34
  35. 35. Who is involved in a CRM project? CEO Operations Call Center Marketing Sales IT Finance 35
  36. 36. Who is involved in a CRM project? CEO Operations Call Center Marketing Sales IT Finance 36
  37. 37. Who is involved in a CRM project? CEO Operations Call Center Marketing Sales IT Finance 37
  38. 38. Who is involved in a CRM project? CEO Operations Call Center Marketing Sales IT Finance 38
  39. 39. Who is involved in a CRM project? CEO Operations Call Center Marketing Sales IT Finance 39
  40. 40. It’s not just a process change: Lone wolf Manual Competitive Autonomous Opaque Change Impacts of CRM 40
  41. 41. It’s not just a process change: Lone wolf Manual Competitive Autonomous Opaque Pack Systemized Collaborative Accountable Transparent 41 Change Impacts of CRM
  42. 42. It’s not just a process change: Lone wolf Manual Competitive Autonomous Opaque Pack Systemized Collaborative Accountable Transparent • Org Change • Individual change 42 Change Impacts of CRM
  43. 43. Tactical: Strategic: • Incremental, eg. modest improvements • Emergent, eg. trajectory is sketched but course corrections are expected • Foreseeable and predictable • Highly ambiguous and dynamic • Project-specific • Enterprise-wide. Portfolio and Program driven • Minor or no culture shift • Major culture impact • Single silo • Cross-functional dependency • Short term (< 1 year) • Multi-year (eg 3-5 years) 43 Characteristics of a CRM case
  44. 44. Survey says? www.tv.com
  45. 45. Thank you! Gail Severini Symphini Change Management Inc. gailseverini@symphini.com 416-845-3040 www.symphini.com ca.linkedin.com/in/gailseverini/ @gailseverini

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