What's on a label

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What's on a label

  1. 1. Endorsed by W hat’ s on a la bel?Click to enterGCSE GCE
  2. 2. Wh at’ s on a la bel?GCEClick to selectTopic 1 Food labelling requirements Topic 2 Information on food labelsTopic 3 Interpreting nutrition information on labels Go to GCSE
  3. 3. GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsHeading W hat’ s on a la bel?GCSEClick to select Topic 1 Food labelling requirements Topic 2 Information on food labels Topic 3 Using nutrition information on food labels Go to GCE Previousto make food choices Slide 3 Next Slide
  4. 4. GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labels lling labe nts Food ireme requClick here for Classroom Slides Click here for Teacher’s Notes Click here for Activity Sheets
  5. 5. GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsFood labellingWhat is food labelling?• Food labelling contains information provided by food businesses about their products• It covers all food that is sold to the consumer directly as well as food sold to cafés, restaurants and other catering establishments• It is controlled by law so it is accurate, not misleading and safeWhy is it important?• It educates the consumer about the food they buy• It helps consumers to make informed choices• It helps consumers to store and use the food safely 1 Next Slide
  6. 6. GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsMandatory information(what must be on the label) 4 1. The name of the food 1 Cooking Instructions Oven from Chilled: Remove outer packaging leaving the pie in the foil. Place on a baking tray in the centre of a pre-heated oven at 180°C/160°C Fan/350°F/Gas Mark 4 for 30 minutes. 2. List of Ingredients Adjust times according to your particular oven. All appliances vary. These are guidelines. Oven heat from chilled 3. The quantity of certain ingredients (QUID) 2 180°C 160°C Fan 350°F 30 MINS Gas Mark 4 4. Instructions for use (if needed) Ingredients: Nutritional Guideline 3 Wheat Flour, Water, Information Daily Amounts Vegetable Oil, Beef 5. ‘Use by’ or ‘best before’ dates (13%), Beef Kidney Typical Values Per 100g Per Serving GDA %GDA 1/4 Pie (10%), Onion, Energy 1027 KJ 1284 KJ Energy 200 Kcal 15% Cornflour, Salt, 246 Kcal 308 Kcal Sugars 90g 2% Protein 7.8g 9.7g Fat 70g 27% Dextrose, Yeast Extract, Carbohydrate 19.7g 24.6g Saturates 20g 45% Malted Barley Extract, of which sugars 1.6g 2.0g Salt 6g 22% 6 Fat 15.1g 18.0g Milk Proteins, Black of which saturates 7.2g 9.0g Pepper, Onion Powder, Fibre 1.3g 1.6g 6. Special storage instructions Glucose Syrup. Sodium 0.4g 0.5g Equivalent as salt 1.0g 1.3g 5 Keep refrigerated below 5°C. Suitable for home freezing. 7. ame and address of the manufacturer, N 8 Freeze on day of purchase and use within 1 month. Do packer or seller 7 Use by: not re-freeze after defrosting. 21 Contact: Jul Consumer Relations, PO Box 118, Keep Refrigerated Co Kerry Made in the UK 8. Place of origin or provenance (if implied)WORKSHEET Click here for Activity 1 Previous Slide 2 Next Slide
  7. 7. GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsMandatory information(what must be on the label)1. The name of the foodIt is illegal for food to have false or misleading names or descriptions.There are three types of names1. Legal name 2. Customary name 3. Descriptive nameTrademarks, brand names, or fancy names may be used in addition to the name of the food.WORKSHEET Click here for Activity 2 Previous Slide 3 Next Slide
  8. 8. GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsMandatory information(what must be on the label)2. List of ingredientsThe list of ingredients on a food label must have a heading that includes the word ‘ingredients’.In most cases, ingredients have to be listed in descending order of weight when the product was prepared. Ingredients: INGREDIENTS Wheat Flour, Water, Vegetable Oil, Beef (13%), Beef Kidney (10%), Cod (65%), Batter (Water, Wheat Flour, Starch (Wheat, Onion, Cornflour, Salt, Dextrose, Yeast Potato), Salt, Corn Flour, Vegetable Oil, Raising Agents Extract, Malted Barley Extract, Milk (Diphosphates, Sodium Carbonates), Skimmed Milk Powder, Proteins, Black Pepper, Onion Powder, Dextrose), Breadcrumbs (Wheat Flour, Yeast, Water, Salt, Glucose Syrup. Spices, Vegetable Oil, Colour (Capsanthin)), Vegetable Oil. Previous Slide 4 Next Slide
  9. 9. GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsMandatory information(what must be on the label)3. he quantity or category of certain ingredients (QUID) TWhen ingredients are emphasised on the label to categorise the food, the quantities of these ingredients shouldbe indicated to ensure that consumers are not misled. This is the Quantitative Ingredient Declaration (QUID).It should be used where:• the ingredient is in the name of the food or is usually associated with that name• the ingredient is emphasised on the labelling in words, pictures or graphics• the ingredient is essential to characterise a food and to distinguish it from another product that it could be confused with. SUGGESTED COOKING GUIDELINES: Shallow Fry, Deep Fry or Grill until piping hot. INGREDIENTS: Pork Meat (55%), Water, Rusk (Wheat flour, Salt, E503), Pork Rind, Seasoning )Spices, Stabilisers: E450. E451, Preservative: E221, Flavour Enhancer: E621, Antioxidant: E301, Spice Extract). Contains: Gluten and Sulphur Dioxide.WORKSHEET Click here for Activity 3 Previous Slide 5 Next Slide
  10. 10. GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsMandatory information(what must be on the label)4. Instructions for useThese are the manufacturer’s instructions for preparing the food.Instructions for use on a dry product Preparation Method 1. Empty contents 3. bring to the boil, of the satchet into reduce heat, partially saucepan cover simmer for 2. Gradually add 850ml (1 1/2 pts) of 5 minutes, cold water. stirring stirring occasionally. constantly 1. Serve Enjoy! .Instructions for use on a fridge product 15–20 190°C/375°F Oven mins Gas Mark 5 • Remove outer packaging and film lid. • lace on a baking tray in the centre of P a pre-heated oven for 15–20 minutes.Instructions for use on a freezer product Cooking Instructions Adjust times accordingly to the particular oven. Oven from Frozen: Remove outer packaging leaving the pie in the foil. Place on a baking tray in the centre of a pre-heated oven at 180°C/160°C Fan 350°F/ Gas Mark 4 for 40 minutes Previous Slide 6 Next Slide
  11. 11. GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsMandatory information(what must be on the label)5. Durability dateThis information is about the storage and use of food which aims to help consumers to use food safely and reduce waste.There are two main types of date marks required1. Best before –– This date mark appears on most pre-packaged foods –– Consumers can use the food after this date but it may not be best quality Best Before End 04 20122. Use by –– This date mark appears on perishable foods –– Consumers risk food poisoning if they use the food after this date Use by: 21 Jul Keep Refrigerated Previous Slide 7 Next Slide
  12. 12. GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsMandatory information(what must be on the label)6. Special storage instructionsFollowing these instructions makes sure the food will last as long as the date shown if ithasn’t been opened, or that it remains safe after opening.Storage instructions for a dry product Store in a cool, dry placeStorage instructions for a fridge productStorage• Keep refrigeratedStorage instructions for a freezer product Storage instructions Store frozen below -18°C Do not refreeze once thawed Previous Slide 8 Next Slide
  13. 13. GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsMandatory information(what must be on the label)7. The name or business name and address of the manufacturer, packer or seller• The label should contain the name or business name and address of the manufacturer, packer or seller in the European Community• If a consumer is not satisfied with how a food is labelled, they should contact the manufacturer, packer or seller Made in Scotland: 1234 Produced in the U.K. for ABC Company Ltd, © Food Central plc 1 High Street, EN8, 95L U.K. SC0111 PO Box 6666 Chester CH99 9QS www.foodcentral.comWORKSHEET Click here for Activity 4 Previous Slide 9 Next Slide
  14. 14. GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsMandatory information(what must be on the label)8. Place of origin or provenancePlace of origin or provenance becomes mandatory on a label if the name implies that the food comes from or hasbeen made in a different country to where it was produced.For example:Salmon smoked in Ireland but made from Norwegian salmon should not be described as ‘Irish smoked salmon’but as ‘Norwegian salmon smoked in Ireland,’ or ‘Imported salmon smoked in Ireland.’If the Norwegian salmon had been labelled as ‘Irish smoked salmon’ in the example below this would be incorrect,because it implies that the salmon came from Ireland when it is in fact Norwegian.Correct Incorrect Norwegian Salmon Irish Smoked Smoked in Ireland Salmon Previous Slide 10 Next Slide
  15. 15. GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsExemptions from Food LabellingRegulations (Northern Ireland) 1996Some foods are excempt from Food Labelling Regulations (Northern Ireland) 1996.This means the regulations do not apply to them• Food that is not pre-packed• Food that is pre-packed for direct sale• Fancy confectionery productsThese foods must be marked with the name of the food.Other special requirements• Milk requires the place of origin• Raw milk requires the address of manufacturer, packer or EC seller• Meat requires QUID• Additives and irradiation need to be indicated Previous Slide 11 Next Slide
  16. 16. GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsVoluntary labellingCertain pieces of information are often included on food labels but are not required by law. These are addedby the manufacturer or retailer voluntarily. Examples of additional information that may be included in alabel are:General Nutrition Marketing ProductionVegetarian or vegan labelling Nutrition information* Marketing terms, for example Production methods, such as fresh, pure, natural organicCountry of origin (where not Nutrition signposting, forrequired) example traffic lights or Pictures and graphics Method of slaughter, for guideline daily amounts example Halal and scechitaServing suggestions slaughter*Nutrition information becomes mandatory when a food or non-alcoholic drink makes a nutrition or a health claim. Previous Slide 12 Next Slide
  17. 17. GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsNanotechnologyNanotechnology is the addition of nanoparticles (tiny particles) to food productswhich enables manufacturers in the food sector to improve flavour and even to makeprocessed foods healthier by reducing the amount of fat and salt needed in production.Nanoparticles are invisible to the human eye.One nanometer is about 60,000 times smaller than the diameter of a human hair.Nanotechnology can be used in food production to improve the taste, colour, flavour,texture and consistency of a variety of foods. Nanotechnology can also be used to improvethe nutritional value of a food by making certain nutrients more bioavailable. Previous Slide 13
  18. 18. Click here for GCE Topic 1 GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsHeading rma tion Info bels on foo d laClick here for Classroom Slides Previous Slide Click here for Teacher’s Notes 1 Click here for ActivityNext Slide Sheets
  19. 19. Click here for GCE Topic 1 GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsClaims on labelsT here are two types of claims on labels Q. What are nutrition claims? Give examples Q. What are health claims?1. A nutrition claim 2. A health claim Give examples 1 Next Slide
  20. 20. Click here for GCE Topic 1 GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labels1. Nutrition claimsA nutrition claim is any claim claim that states, suggests or implies that the foodhas a particular beneficial nutritional property due to the following;The energy (calorific value)• it provides• it provides at a reduced or increased rate, or• it does not provideThe nutrients or other substances• it contains, for example high fibre• it contains in reduced or increased proportions, for example low fat, or• it does not contain, for example trans fats. Previous Slide 2 Next Slide
  21. 21. Click here for GCE Topic 1 GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsNutrition labellingQ: When is it mandatory to provide nutrition labelling on a food product?• It is mandatory if a nutrition claim (for example, low fat) or health claim (for example, with Omega 3) is made• Sometimes manufacturers provide it voluntarily even if the food does not make a nutrition or health claim. It doesn’t apply to natural mineral waters• Nutrition labelling is covered by the Food Labelling Regulations (Northern Ireland 1996). Nutrition claims are covered under the Nutrition and Health Claims Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2007, as amended1. A nutrition claim 2. A health claim Previous Slide 3 Next Slide
  22. 22. Click here for GCE Topic 1 GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsHealth claimsA health claim is any claim that states, suggests or implies that a relationship exists between a food category,a food or one of its constituents and health. Health claims must be based on generally accepted scientific dataand be well understood by the average consumer.To ensure health claims are genuine the European Food Safety Authority put together a list of health claimsthat can be used by food manufacturers.The following health claims cannot be made.• Claims on alcoholic beverages• Claims that health could be affected by not consuming the food• Claims that refer to the rate or amount of weight loss• Claims that refer to recommendations of individual doctors or health professionalsWORKSHEET Click here for Activity 1 Previous Slide 4 Next Slide
  23. 23. Click here for GCE Topic 1 GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsSuperfoodsSuperfoods is a term that has been used by some manufacturers and retailers tosuggest a food can protect against certain diseases.Under EU legislation, use of the term superfoods is not allowed unless it isaccompanied by an authorised health claim that explains to consumers why theproduct is good for their health.Avocado Broccoli Blueberries Previous Slide 5 Next Slide
  24. 24. Click here for GCE Topic 1 GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsFunctional foodsFunctional foods is a loosely defined marketing term that is applied to foodscontaining added ingredients that have a supposed health benefit. Added calcium Added minerals Previous Slide 6 Next Slide
  25. 25. Click here for GCE Topic 1 GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsMarketing termsCertain terms are used by manufacturers, producers and retailers to market their products, but it is important that these terms do not mislead consumers. These are known as marketing terms.Examples of marketing terms Q. Who uses• Fresh – Can be helpful to identify produce that is sold within a short time of marketing terms production or harvesting and why?• Pure – Mostly for foods containing single ingredients to which nothing has been added• Natural – Only contains natural ingredients with no other added ingredients Sugar 100% Natural Previous Slide 7 Next Slide
  26. 26. Click here for GCE Topic 1 GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsSpecial dietary advice – allergens• Food allergy, food intolerance and coeliac disease can cause some people to become ill• Food allergy symptoms can be immediate and even fatal• It is important that food labels help people with a food allergy or intolerance make safe food choices• There are 14 ingredients (including derivatives) that by law must be mentioned on the label in the ingredients list, even if added at very low levels• Celery Eggs Fish Cereals containing gluten* Molluscs (such as (wheat, barley, rye, oats, mussels and oysters) spelt and kamut) Sesame seeds Crustaceans (such Nuts Lupin Milk as lobster and crab) Mustard Peanuts Sulphur dioxides Soybeans and sulphites* roducts containing gluten can be labelled ‘gluten free’ if the concentration of gluten is less P than 20mg/kg or ‘very low gluten’ if concentration is less than 100mg/kg. This allows people with coeliac disease to make more informed choices. Q. Why is special dietary advice important on labelling? Previous Slide 8 Next Slide
  27. 27. Click here for GCE Topic 1 GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsSpecial dietary advice – allergensSome manufacturers include an allergy advice box on the label which highlightsallergens present in the food.Some manufacturers voluntarily use precautionary labelling to indicate any doubtsor uncertainties they have about the presence of a particular allergen in theirfood product. This includes ‘may contain’ statements, and ‘produced in a factorywhere nuts are used.’ Consumers who are sensitive to certain foods must take allprecautionary labelling into account.Allergy advice box Precautionary labelling ALLERGY ADVICE Packed in a factory handling nuts and sesame seeds. Previous Slide 9 Next Slide
  28. 28. Click here for GCE Topic 1 GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsSpecial dietary advice – vegetarians vegansIf a food is labelled vegetarian, it means that the food doesn’t contain any meat,fish, or poultry etc. or additives from animal sources such as gelatine.Products carrying the Vegetarian Society Approved logo must meet certain requirementslaid down by the Vegetarian Society.If a food is labelled vegan, it means that the food does not contain any animal products,including those from living animals – such as milk. VEGETARIANVegetarian logo Vegan logo Previous Slide 10 Next Slide
  29. 29. Click here for GCE Topic 1 GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsFood additivesFood additives are:• any substance added to food at any stage in the production, processing, treatment, packaging, transportation or storage of that food• often natural substances and in many cases are actually vitamins and minerals.Food additives cannot be used if they:• disguise faulty processing Ingredients as served (greatest first):• deceive the consumer Noodles (Water, Wheat Flour, Palm Oil (contains• reduce the nutritional value of the food. Antioxidants (E320, E330, E310)), Salt), Onion, Salt, Glucose Syrup Solids, Flavour Enhancers (E621, E635), Garlic, Parsley, Yeast Extract (contains Barley),There are seven main groups of food additives: Flavouring, Maltodextrin, Turmeric, Malic Acid,• antioxidants Vegetable Oil, Chicken Fat, Acidity• colours Regulators (E330, E262(ii), E339),• flavour enhancers Celery, Milk• sweeteners Q. Why are food Powder and Wheat• emulsifiers additives used? Flour. E300• stabilisers Artificial Substance Natural Substance• preservatives.E numbers are codes for food additives which are found on food labels throughout the EU.For example, E300 is vitamin C. Previous Slide 11 Next Slide
  30. 30. Click here for GCE Topic 1 GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsLabelling laws: controls on additivesAll food additives used in the EU undergo the following steps. Ingredients: Chicken Meat, Soya Protein,Step 1: A safety evaluation Modified Corn Starch and Spices. Contain PermittedStep 2: cceptable Daily Intake (ADI) (determining the level below which the A Flavour Enhancer intake of the substance can be considered safe) (E450, E451, E452) and Preservative (E250, E252).Step 3: A unique E number assignedLabelling laws• The same code for E numbers is used throughout the EU. Additives are classed FLAVOUR SACHET: Salt, Flavourenhancers according to their function and assigned a code, which consists of the letter E (E621, E627, E631)Chicken followed by three numbers. flavour, hydrolysed vegetable protein (soy, wheat), onion• European Union (EU) legislation requires most additives used in foods to be powder, sugar, yeast extract, maltodextrin, parley, herbs, labelled clearly in the list of ingredients, either by name or by an E number spices,colour (E160b).• This allows the consumer to avoid foods containing specific additives• Some examples of E numbers are E101 Vitamin B1, E300 Vitamin C• The laws relating to food additives are set out in European Community Regulation No. 1333/2008WORKSHEET Click here for Activity 2 Previous Slide 12 Next Slide
  31. 31. Click here for GCE Topic 1 GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsOrganic foodOrganic food plays a role in providing choice for consumers.There are many different reasons why consumers choose to buy organic food. These caninclude health reasons, concern for the environment and animal welfare. Eating organicfood is one way to reduce consumption of pesticide residues and additives. However,organic food can often be more expensive and less readily available. CERTIFIED ORGANIC: IE-Org-02 rg a n ic S Licence No 4205 e dO t an ov d ar A p pr d IOFGAWORKSHEET Click here for Activity 3 Previous Slide 13 Next Slide
  32. 32. Click here for GCE Topic 1 GCE Topic 2 Click here for GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsGenetically Modified Organisms (GMOs)Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) are organisms, such asplants and animals, whose genetic characteristics are being modifiedartificially in order to give them a new property. Food and feed whichcontain or consist of such GMOs, or are produced from GMOs, arecalled genetically modified (GM) food or feed.Issues with GM food DressingSome consumers object to GM foods for a variety of reasons including: Ingredients: water, vegetable oils• a fear of potential damage to the environment (contains genetically modified soya bean oil), sugar, vinegar, modified starch, wheat starch,• ethical or moral concerns salt, mustard (water, mustard seed, vinegar,• perceived food safety risks. salt, spices, herbs), egg yolk, thickener (E412), acids (E330), preservatives (E202) GM on labelWORKSHEET Click here for Activity 4 Previous Slide 14
  33. 33. Click here for GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsHeading eting rmation terpr info In ition nutr ls o n labeClick here for Classroom Slides Previous Slide Click here for Teacher’s Notes 1 Click here for ActivityNext Slide Sheets
  34. 34. Click here for GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsThe eatwell plate 1 Next Slide
  35. 35. Click here for GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsMaking healthy food choices – the label linkFood labels give information that allows the consumer to compare one foodwith another and make wise food choices within each food group.For example, the consumer can use labels to choose:• a ham sandwich with a higher fibre and lower salt content• a pizza with lower salt content• a cheddar cheese with lower fat content• a breakfast cereal with a higher fibre and lower sugar content. Previous Slide 2 Next Slide
  36. 36. Click here for GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsFront of Pack labelling schemesMost of the big supermarkets and many food manufacturers display nutritional informationon the front of pre-packed food – this is referred to as Front of Pack labelling (FoP).• FoP labelling is not mandatory (not required by law)• It is very useful for comparing similar food products at a glance Per pack provides... LOW LOW HIGH MED 286 2g 8g 3.6g 1.5g FAT SAT FAT SUGAR SALT Calories Sugar Fat Saturates Salt 7.7g 2.0g 42.2g 2.0g 14% 2.2% 11% 18% 25% Per serve Per serve Per serve Per serve of your guideline daily amountTraffic light labelling Guideline Daily AmountWORKSHEET Click here for Activity 1 Previous Slide 3 Next Slide
  37. 37. Click here for GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsFront of Pack (FoP) labellingPick the healthier optionPizzaThin Crisply Cajun Chicken Italian Pepperoni MEDIUM MEDIUM LOW MEDIUM HIGH HIGH LOW HIGH Fat Sat Fat Sugars Salt Fat Sat Fat Sugars Salt 9.1g 4.8g 4.8g 1.4g 25.2g 8.7g 4.5g 3g Per serve Per serve Per serve Per serve Per serve Per serve Per serve Per serveHalf a pizza contains Half a pizza contains Calories Sugars Fat Saturates Salt Calories Sugars Fat Saturates Salt 391 4.8g 9.1g 4.8g 1.4g 545 4.5g 25.2g 8.7g 3g 20% 5% 13% 24% 23% 27% 5% 36% 44% 50%Of your guideline daily amount Of your guideline daily amount Q. Name the two types of Front of PackBreakfast Cereals labelling systemsShredded Wheat Coco Pops shown here LOW LOW LOW LOW LOW LOW HIGH MEDIUM Fat Sat Fat Sugars Salt Fat Sat Fat Sugars Salt 0.7g 0.2g 0.2g Trace 0.8g 0.3g 11.8g 0.3g Per serve Per serve Per serve Per serve Per serve Per serve Per serve Per serveEach 45g serving with 125ml semi skimmed milk contains Each 30g serving contains Calories Sugars Fat Saturates Salt Calories Sugars Fat Saturates Salt 217 6.3g 3.2g 1.4g 0.2g 161 11.8g 0.8g 0.3g 0.3g 11% 7% 5% 7% 3.3% 6% 13% 1% 2% 5%Of your guideline daily amount Of your guideline daily amount Previous Slide 4 Next Slide
  38. 38. Click here for GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsTraffic light labellingD eveloped by the Food Standards Agency FAT LOW 7.7g per serving SATURATES LOW 2.0g per serving Per serving FAT 7.7g HIGH SUGAR 2.0g 42.0g per serving SATURATES 42.2g LOW LOW HIGH MED SUGAR FAT SAT FAT SUGAR SALT SALT SALT 2.0g MED 2.0g per serving 7.7g 2.0g 42.2g 2.0g HIGH MEDIUM LOW Per serve Per serve Per serve Per serveCompare these two labels found on oven chips and discuss MED LOW LOW MED HIGH HIGH LOW MED FAT SAT FAT SUGAR SALT CALS FAT SAT FAT SUGAR SALT CALS 22.1g 9.7g 0.7g 0.7g 342 5.1g 0.8g 0.8g 0.8g 252 32% 48% 1% 11% 17% 7% 4% 1% 14% 13% % of your Guideline Daily Amount % of your Guideline Daily Amount Per 135g serving Oven Cooked Per 165g serving Oven CookedWORKSHEET Click here for Activity 2 Previous Slide 5 Next Slide
  39. 39. Click here for GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsGuideline Daily Amounts (GDAs)Developed by the Institute of Grocery Distribution Number Grammes Grammes Of which Grammes of calories of sugar of fat saturates of salt Per pack provides... 286 2g 8g 3.6g 1.5g Calories Sugar Fat Saturates SaltPercentage GDA 14% 2.2% 11% 18% 25% of your guideline daily amount Previous Slide 6 Next Slide
  40. 40. Click here for GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsHow to calculate GDAs Information on GDAs and the contribution a nutrient makes towards a GDA (expressed as a percentage) can usually be found on the back or side of packaging. The percentage GDA is sometimes repeated on the front of the pack. GDA values for adults and children Calculation Nutrient Adult Man Adult Woman Children* Amount of Nutrient Energy 2500 calories 2000 calories 1800 calories X 100 Sugar 120g 90g 85g GDA value Fat 95g 70g 70g Saturated Fat 30g 20g 20g Salt 6g 6g 4g* 5-10 years old*5–10 years old WORKSHEET Click here for Activity 3 Previous Slide 7 Next Slide
  41. 41. Click here for GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsFortified foodsFortified food has micronutrients (essential trace minerals and vitamins) added to it.Flour and margarine have to be fortified by law.Although it doesn’t have to be stated on the label, flourin the UK must be fortified with the following:• calcium carbonate• iron• thiamin (vitamin B1)• nicotinic acid or nicotinamide. Previous Slide 8 Next Slide
  42. 42. Click here for GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsResponsible food advertising –Headingnutrient profiling modelThe Food Standards Agency (FSA) developed a nutrient profiling model to distinguishfoods that were high in fat, salt or sugar from those which were not.The model was developed as a tool to differentiate foods that were high in fat, salt orsugar. This enabled Ofcom to improve the balance of television advertising to childrenby introducing restrictions on foods that are high in fat, salt or sugar, while continuingto promote healthier alternatives. Ofcom is the communication regulator for the UK.They regulate the TV and radio sectors, fixed line telecoms, mobiles, postal services,plus the airwaves over which wireless devices operate.The nutrient profiling model was developed as a tool to address the bias towards foodsthat are high in fat, salt or sugar in the television promotion of foods to children. It isnot intended to give dietary advice to consumers. The FSA is not promoting the modelfor any other use. Previous Slide 9 Next Slide
  43. 43. Click here for GCE Topic 1 Click here for GCE Topic 2 GCE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Interpreting nutrition for GCSErequirements information on labelsNew European Union Food Information RegulationA new Food Information Regulation (FIR) was published in the Official Journal of theEuropean Union (EU) on 22 November 2011.Many of the current food labelling requirements of the Food Labelling Regulations(Northern Ireland) 1996 will remain but there are some significant changes.The additional requirements will come in over a 3–to–5 year period. Previous Slide 10
  44. 44. Click here for GCSE Topic 1GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic for GCSE Topic 2 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choicesHeading lling labe nts Food ireme requClick here for Classroom Slides Previous Slide Click here for Teacher’s Notes Click here for Activities and 1 Information Sheets Next Slide
  45. 45. Click here for GCSE Topic 1GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic for GCSE Topic 2 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choicesFood labellingHeadingWhat is food labelling?• Food labelling contains information provided by food businesses about their products• It covers all food that is sold to the consumer directly as well as food sold to cafés, restaurants and other catering establishments• It is controlled by law so it is accurate, not misleading and safeWhy is it important?• It educates the consumer about the food they buy• It helps consumers to make informed choices• It helps consumers to store and use the food safely Previous Slide 1 Next Slide
  46. 46. Click here for GCSE Topic 1GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic for GCSE Topic 2 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choicesMandatory informationHeading(what must be on the label) 4 1. The name of the food 1 Cooking Instructions Oven from Chilled: Remove outer packaging leaving the pie in the foil. Place on a baking tray in the centre of a pre-heated oven at 180°C/160°C Fan/350°F/Gas Mark 4 for 30 minutes. 2. List of Ingredients Adjust times according to your particular oven. All appliances vary. These are guidelines. Oven heat from chilled 3. The quantity of certain ingredients (QUID) 2 180°C 160°C Fan 350°F 30 MINS Gas Mark 4 4. Instructions for use (if needed) Ingredients: Nutritional Guideline 3 Wheat Flour, Water, Information Daily Amounts Vegetable Oil, Beef 5. ‘Use by’ or ‘best before’ dates (13%), Beef Kidney Typical Values Per 100g Per Serving GDA %GDA 1/4 Pie (10%), Onion, Energy 1027 KJ 1284 KJ Energy 200 Kcal 15% Cornflour, Salt, 246 Kcal 308 Kcal Sugars 90g 2% Protein 7.8g 9.7g Fat 70g 27% Dextrose, Yeast Extract, Carbohydrate 19.7g 24.6g Saturates 20g 45% Malted Barley Extract, of which sugars 1.6g 2.0g Salt 6g 22% 6 Fat 15.1g 18.0g Milk Proteins, Black of which saturates 7.2g 9.0g Pepper, Onion Powder, Fibre 1.3g 1.6g 6. Special storage instructions Glucose Syrup. Sodium 0.4g 0.5g Equivalent as salt 1.0g 1.3g 5 Keep refrigerated below 5°C. Suitable for home freezing. 7. ame and address of the manufacturer, N 8 Freeze on day of purchase and use within 1 month. Do packer or seller 7 Use by: not re-freeze after defrosting. 21 Contact: Jul Consumer Relations, PO Box 118, Keep Refrigerated Co Kerry Made in the UK 8. Place of origin or provenance (if implied)POSTER Click here for food label Information Sheet Previous Slide 2 Next Slide
  47. 47. Click here for GCSE Topic 1GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic for GCSE Topic 2 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choicesMandatory informationHeading(what must be on the label)1. The name of the foodIt is illegal for food to have false or misleading names or descriptions. Q. Why is it incorrect? Correct name Incorrect name Previous Slide 3 Next Slide
  48. 48. Click here for GCSE Topic 1GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic for GCSE Topic 2 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choicesMandatory informationHeading(what must be on the label)2. List of ingredientsThe list of ingredients on a food label must have a heading that includes the word ‘ingredients’.In most cases, ingredients have to be listed in descending order of weight when the product was prepared. Ingredients: INGREDIENTS Wheat Flour, Water, Vegetable Oil, Beef (13%), Beef Kidney (10%), Cod (65%), Batter (Water, Wheat Flour, Starch (Wheat, Onion, Cornflour, Salt, Dextrose, Yeast Potato), Salt, Corn Flour, Vegetable Oil, Raising Agents Extract, Malted Barley Extract, Milk (Diphosphates, Sodium Carbonates), Skimmed Milk Powder, Proteins, Black Pepper, Onion Powder, Dextrose), Breadcrumbs (Wheat Flour, Yeast, Water, Salt, Glucose Syrup. Spices, Vegetable Oil, Colour (Capsanthin)), Vegetable Oil. Previous Slide 4 Next Slide
  49. 49. Click here for GCSE Topic 1GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic for GCSE Topic 2 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choicesMandatory informationHeading(what must be on the label)3. Quantative Ingredient Declaration (QUID)When ingredients are emphasised on the label to categorise the food, the quantities of these ingredients shouldbe shown to make sure that consumers are not misled. This is the Quantitative Ingredient Declaration (QUID).It should be used where:• the ingredient is in the name of the food or is usually associated with that name• the ingredient is emphasised on the labelling in words, pictures or graphics• the ingredient is essential to characterise a food and to distinguish it from another product that it could be confused with.The minimum percentage of the ingredient in the food must be given either next to the nameof the food or in the ingredients list. Ingredients: Wheat Flour, Water, Vegetable Oil, Beef (13%), Beef Kidney (10%), Example of QUID Onion, Cornflour, Salt, Dextrose, Yeast Extract, Malted Barley Extract, Milk Proteins, Black Pepper, Onion WORKSHEET Use by: 21 Jul Keep Refrigerated Powder, Glucose Syrup. Click here for Activity 1 Previous Slide 5 Next Slide
  50. 50. Click here for GCSE Topic 1GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic for GCSE Topic 2 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choicesMandatory informationHeading(what must be on the label)4. Instructions for useThese are the manufacturer’s instructions for preparing the food.Instructions for use on a dry product Preparation Method 1. Empty contents 3. bring to the boil, of the satchet into reduce heat, partially saucepan cover simmer for 2. Gradually add 850ml (1 1/2 pts) of 5 minutes, cold water. stirring stirring occasionally. constantly 1. Serve Enjoy! .Instructions for use on a fridge product 15–20 190°C/375°F Oven mins Gas Mark 5 • Remove outer packaging and film lid. • lace on a baking tray in the centre of P a pre-heated oven for 15–20 minutes.Instructions for use on a freezer product Cooking Instructions Adjust times accordingly to the particular oven. Oven from Frozen: Remove outer packaging leaving the pie in the foil. Place on a baking WORKSHEET tray in the centre of a pre-heated oven at 180°C/160°C Fan 350°F/ Gas Mark 4 for 40 minutes Click here for Activity 2 Previous Slide 6 Next Slide
  51. 51. Click here for GCSE Topic 1GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic for GCSE Topic 2 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choicesMandatory informationHeading(what must be on the label)5. Durability dateThis information is about the storage and use of food which aims to help consumers to use food safely and reduce waste.There are two main types of date marks required1. Best before –– This date mark appears on most pre-packaged foods –– Consumers can use the food after this date but it may not be best quality Best Before End 04 20122. Use by –– This date mark appears on perishable foods –– Consumers risk food poisoning if they use the food after this date Use by: 21 Jul WORKSHEET Keep Refrigerated Click here for Activity 3 Previous Slide 7 Next Slide
  52. 52. Click here for GCSE Topic 1GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic for GCSE Topic 2 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choicesMandatory informationHeading(what must be on the label)6. Special storage instructionsFollowing these instructions makes sure the food will last as long as the date shown if ithasn’t been opened, or that it remains safe after opening.Storage instructions for a dry product Store in a cool, dry placeStorage instructions for a fridge product Storage • Keep refrigeratedStorage instructions for a freezer product Storage instructions Store frozen below -18°C Do not refreeze once thawedWORKSHEET Click here for Activity 4 Previous Slide 8 Next Slide
  53. 53. Click here for GCSE Topic 1GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic for GCSE Topic 2 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choicesMandatory informationHeading(what must be on the label)7. The name or business name and address of the manufacturer, packer or seller• The label should contain the name or business name and address of the manufacturer, packer or seller in the European Community• If a consumer is not satisfied with how a food is labelled, they should contact the manufacturer, packer or seller Made in Scotland: 1234 Produced in the U.K. for ABC Company Ltd, © Food Central plc 1 High Street, EN8, 95L U.K. SC0111 PO Box 6666 Chester CH99 9QS www.foodcentral.com Previous Slide 9 Next Slide
  54. 54. Click here for GCSE Topic 1GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic for GCSE Topic 2 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choicesMandatory informationHeading(what must be on the label)8. Place of origin or provenancePlace of origin or provenance becomes mandatory on a label if the name implies that the food comes from or hasbeen made in a different country to where it was produced.For example:Salmon smoked in Ireland but made from Norwegian salmon should not be described as ‘Irish smoked salmon’but as ‘Norwegian salmon smoked in Ireland,’ or ‘Imported salmon smoked in Ireland.’If the Norwegian salmon had been labelled as ‘Irish smoked salmon’ in the example below this would be incorrect,because it implies that the salmon came from Ireland when it is in fact Norwegian.Correct Incorrect Norwegian Salmon Irish Smoked Smoked in Ireland Salmon WORKSHEET Click here for Activity 5 Previous Slide 10 Next Slide
  55. 55. Click here for GCSE Topic 1GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic for GCSE Topic 2 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choicesVoluntaryHeading labellingCertain pieces of information are often included on food labels but are not required by law. These are addedby the manufacturer or retailer voluntarily. Examples of additional information that may be included in alabel are: General Nutrition Marketing Production Vegetarian or vegan labelling Nutrition information* Marketing terms, for example Production methods, such as fresh, pure, natural organic Country of origin (where not Nutrition signposting, for required) example traffic lights or Pictures and graphics Method of slaughter, for guideline daily amounts example Halal and scechita Serving suggestions slaughter*Nutrition information becomes mandatory when a food or non-alcoholic drink makes a nutrition or a health claim.WORKSHEET Click here for Activity 6 Previous Slide 11 Next Slide
  56. 56. Click here for GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choicesHeading rma tion Info bels on foo d laClick here for Classroom Slides Previous Slide Click here for Teacher’s Notes Click here for Activities and 1 Information Sheets Next Slide
  57. 57. Click here for GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choicesNutritionHeading labelling• Nutrition labelling is mandatory if a nutrition claim (for example, low fat) or health claim (for example, with Omega 3) is made• Sometimes manufacturers provide the nutrition information voluntarily even if the food does not make a nutrition or health claim. It doesn’t apply to natural mineral waterNutrition claim Health claim Previous Slide 1 Next Slide
  58. 58. Click here for GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choicesNutritionHeading labelling• There are two main formats for providing nutritional information Nutrition Information • Typical Value per 100g • Energy 364kj/87kcal Protein 1.0g Typical Composition. 100g (3oz) provide: Energy 536kJ/128kcal, Carbohydrate 16.5g Protein 15.0g, Carbohydrate 3.5g (of which sugars 3.5g), Fat 6.0g (of which saturates 3.8g, mono-unsaturates 1.4g, Fat Nil polyunsaturates 0.1g), Fibre 0g, Sodium 0.3g.Linear format Tabular formatLine format Previous Slide 2 Next Slide
  59. 59. Click here for GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choicesNutrient quantities on food labelsHeading– high, medium or low Check how much Food Shopping Card fat, sugar and salt is in your food Sugars Fat Saturates Salt What is Over Over Over Over HIGH 15g 20g 5g 1.5g per 100g Remember that the What is Between 5g Between Between 1.5g Between 0.3g 3g amount you eat of a MEDIUM and 15g and 20g and 5g and 1.5g per 100g particular food affects how much sugars, fat, What is 5g saturates and salt you LOW and below 3g and below 1.5g and below 0.3g and below will get from it. per 100gWORKSHEET Click here for Activity 1 Previous Slide 3 Next Slide
  60. 60. Click here for GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choicesClaims onHeading labelsT here are two types of claims on labels1. A nutrition claim 2. A health claim Previous Slide 4 Next Slide
  61. 61. Click here for GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choices1. Nutrition claimsHeadingA nutrition claim is any claim that states, suggests or implies that the food has aparticular beneficial nutritional property due to the following;The energy (calorific value)• it provides• it provides at a reduced or increased rate, or• it does not provideThe nutrients or other substances• it contains, for example high fibre• it contains in reduced or increased proportions, for example low fat, or• it does not contain, for example trans fats.POSTER Click here for Activity 2 WORKSHEET Click here for Information Sheet Previous Slide 5 Next Slide
  62. 62. Click here for GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choices2. HealthHeading claimsA health claim is any claim that states, suggests or implies that a relationship exists between a foodcategory, a food or one of its constituents and health.The nutrition and health claims are controlled in Northern Ireland by the Nutrition and Health ClaimsRegulations (Northern Ireland) 2007. Previous Slide 6 Next Slide
  63. 63. Click here for GCSE Topic 1 Click here for GCSE Topic 2 GCSE Topic 2 Click here 3 GCSE Topicfor GCSE Topic 3 Click hereFood labelling Information on food labels Using nutrition information on for GCErequirements food labels to make food choicesFortifiedHeading foodsFortified food has micronutrients (essential trace minerals and vitamins) added to it.Flour and margarine have to be fortified by law.Although it doesn’t have to be stated on the label, flour in the UK must be fortified with the following:• calcium carbonate• iron• thiamin (vitamin B1)• nicotinic acid or nicotinamide Previous Slide 7 Next Slide

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