Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Putting Youth at the Center for
Collective Impact through STEM
Workshop for the YMCA; Girls Inc; 4H;
Big Brothers Big Sist...
About Today
• What is happening with your students
developmentally and what does this have to
do with STEM?
• What matters...
What is Happening with Your
Students Developmentally?
8-9 Year-Olds
• They are working on how to
relate to peers and play
through elaborately
structured games
• Want to know th...
10-12 Year-Olds
• Starting to move away from
being little children towards
adulthood and the world they
want (or will be f...
13-16 Year-Olds
• They are focusing on things they can
experience here and now
• Arguing skills improve (and are
demonstra...
Who Are Minorities in STEM?
• Students of color
• Middle and low socio-economic status
• Students who come from under-
res...
Traditional National STEM
Engagement Strategies
• Resources, programs focused
on academic top 10%
• Government funding is ...
Stuff We Know From Research
• High caliber experiences in school are
necessary but not sufficient
• Interest in science in...
3 Most Effective Strategies
for Minority Students for
Long Term STEM Engagement
• overnight and residential or summer
prog...
Stuff We Know from (Project
Exploration’s) Experience
• Someone knows their name
• The program “never ends”
• They learn h...
Science Identities?
• Shy and are able to come out of their shell in
a supportive group that shares their
interests
• Want...
What Does it Take to Reach Your
Students with STEM?
• Students at the center
• Relationship-based
• Interest-driven
• Mean...
STEM Programming
at the Organization Level
Put Science into
the Service of Your Students
(Developmental Recap)
Youth need to…
• know how to focus their attention on their work
• keep trying even when they get di...
1st Question:
What is Worth Knowing & Experiencing?
• What’s worth young people in your programs knowing and
experiencing ...
Experiencing….
• Students voice and choice
• Voluntary
• Interest-driven learning experiences
• High impact programs in sc...
Knowing…
• Science is an approach to the world; science
is process as well as content.
• Meaningful work matters – best of...
5-E Model for a Scientist-Led Session
Engagement
Exploration
Explanation
Elaboration
Evaluation
24
Approaches That Work
• Cooperative learning
groups
• Hands-on experiences
• Emphasis on practical
applications
• Teaching ...
Roles & Relationships
STEM Programming
as a Collective
State of STEM in
Out-of-SchoolTime in Chicago
Pathways Cooperative Leadership
Without Collaborative Intervention….
• Chicago student achievement in STEM in school
will remain sub-par;
• African Americ...
Impact of STEM in Out of School
Time
• STEM knowledge and skills
• Higher likelihood of graduation and
pursuing a STEM car...
Criterion
• Out-of-school time (weekends, afternoons and
evenings, summer, school holidays).
• Youth in grades K-16.
• Chi...
What Are “STEM Pathways?”
The collection of STEM experiences a young
person has between Kindergarten and 12th
grade.
Survey Questions
• What content is being offered? Are
programs providing progressive learning
opportunities?
• How many op...
Data Sources
• Survey: 314 programs from 111
organizations
• Existing Data: 1,718 programs
• Total : 2,032 programs
36
Program Characteristics
38.0%
28.5%
0.9%
33.7%
7.7%
0.0%
10.0%
20.0%
30.0%
40.0%
50.0%
60.0%
Percent of STEM Programs by
C...
77%
7%
10%
4%
1% 1%
Percent of STEM Programs by
Site Type
School-based Park-based
CBO/Other-based Library-based
Museum-bas...
56%
44%
Percent of STEM Participants
by Gender
Female Male
46.4%
57.8%
32.6%
6.1%
0.0%
10.0%
20.0%
30.0%
40.0%
50.0%
60.0%...
42%
0%
3%
9%
44%
1% 1%
Percent of 2011-2012 CPS
Students by Race Ethnicity
African American American Indian
Asian American...
Where Programs Are Available
41
Where & When
42
Structured Content: Goals & Activities
0.0%
20.0%
40.0%
60.0%
80.0%
100.0%
Science (111) Tech (25) Engineering (12) Math (...
Program Age by Type of Funder
44
55.6%
87.0%
50.0%
11.1%
53.1%
73.3%
86.7%
53.3%
40.0%
56.7%
61.8%
96.1%
85.5%
82.9%
85.5%...
Findings & Observations
• Program providers are highly engaged but
unorganized.
• Data is hard to access and sometimes
doe...
Convening: December 2012
Now that we have some data…
• How should we organize ourselves?
• What skills matter for young people to
develop across th...
STEM Pathways Vision:
Chicago as a Ecosystem
An ecosystem of opportunities accessed
easily by a “self-guided” student or a...
Recommendations: Access
• Create a citywide STEM OST clearinghouse
• Reduce barriers:
– multi‐lingual programs
– reduced‐f...
Recommendation: Coordination
• Prioritize funding that enables organizations to
collaborate and coordinate services and le...
Recommendations: Data
• Establish a common language for goals; facilitate
collection of longitudinal data and analysis of ...
Cooperative Outcomes
Potential of a Cooperative Approach
to STEM for Youth
• Purpose:
From Competitiveness  Access and Equity
• Measure:
From ...
Your Collective Question Moving for
the Future
What do WE mean
when WE say
STEM in service to youth?
Thank you.
www.Lyon-Strategies.com
Collective Impact through STEM for National Youth Serving Organizations
Collective Impact through STEM for National Youth Serving Organizations
Collective Impact through STEM for National Youth Serving Organizations
Collective Impact through STEM for National Youth Serving Organizations
Collective Impact through STEM for National Youth Serving Organizations
Collective Impact through STEM for National Youth Serving Organizations
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Collective Impact through STEM for National Youth Serving Organizations

391 views

Published on

This presentation was part of a workshop facilitated by Gabrielle Lyon for a convening of representatives from five national youth-serving organizations: YMCA, Big Brothers Big Sisters, Girls Inc, 4-H and Boys and Girls Clubs. The organizations are considering a national collective impact project centered on bringing STEM to underrepresented youth and increasing the number of young people they serve.

Published in: Education, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Collective Impact through STEM for National Youth Serving Organizations

  1. 1. Putting Youth at the Center for Collective Impact through STEM Workshop for the YMCA; Girls Inc; 4H; Big Brothers Big Sisters; and Boys and Girls Clubs Gabrielle H. Lyon, PhD Lyon-Strategies.com Chicago, IL May 28, 2014
  2. 2. About Today • What is happening with your students developmentally and what does this have to do with STEM? • What matters for YOUR students in STEM? • What makes a good STEM program at an organizational level? • What might student-centered STEM programming look like from a collective?
  3. 3. What is Happening with Your Students Developmentally?
  4. 4. 8-9 Year-Olds • They are working on how to relate to peers and play through elaborately structured games • Want to know the reasons for things; want to develop a sense of accomplishment; • Use language to deepen understanding by talking about what they’re thinking and using evidence to defend what they’re thinking
  5. 5. 10-12 Year-Olds • Starting to move away from being little children towards adulthood and the world they want (or will be forced to) join in the near future. • Thinking about the bigger picture and how things – and they – fit in • Relationships can by unsettled for girls and competitive for boys • They need guidance - but also independence • From: Women and Children’s Health Network; http://www.cyh.com/healthtopics/healthtopicdetails.aspx?p=114&np=122&id=18 65#3
  6. 6. 13-16 Year-Olds • They are focusing on things they can experience here and now • Arguing skills improve (and are demonstrated often and with great passion) • Reasoning skills improve: – apply concepts to specific examples – use deductive reasoning and make educated guesses – reason through problems even in the absence of concrete events or examples – able to construct hypothetical solutions to a problem and evaluate which is best Introduction to Child Development, 5th ed., West Publishing, 1993 By John P. Dworetzky .
  7. 7. Who Are Minorities in STEM? • Students of color • Middle and low socio-economic status • Students who come from under- resourced schools and communities • Students who struggle academically: (If you can’t read well you don’t get to do STEM) • Students who believe it’s important but “Not for Me”
  8. 8. Traditional National STEM Engagement Strategies • Resources, programs focused on academic top 10% • Government funding is “soft” money; primarily ends up at universities and research- based institutions • High-caliber informal experiences target academically elite students, identified interest in science, families who can pay for them.
  9. 9. Stuff We Know From Research • High caliber experiences in school are necessary but not sufficient • Interest in science in 8th grade is a better predictor than test scores • Students from underrepresented minority groups face specific obstacles at different points…
  10. 10. 3 Most Effective Strategies for Minority Students for Long Term STEM Engagement • overnight and residential or summer programs • one-on-one opportunities • hands on lab experiences  Key element across all successful programs: commitment and effectiveness of program staff. * Investigating the Human Potential, AAAS 1983.
  11. 11. Stuff We Know from (Project Exploration’s) Experience • Someone knows their name • The program “never ends” • They learn how to write • They’re in the news – for something good
  12. 12. Science Identities? • Shy and are able to come out of their shell in a supportive group that shares their interests • Want more science and can’t get it at school • Discover – to their surprise - that there is a place for them in science – they have talents, skills and passions for something other than science while doing science
  13. 13. What Does it Take to Reach Your Students with STEM? • Students at the center • Relationship-based • Interest-driven • Meaningful, high impact science experiences – Sequenced; active; focused; explicit – Authentic Not just about science.
  14. 14. STEM Programming at the Organization Level Put Science into the Service of Your Students
  15. 15. (Developmental Recap) Youth need to… • know how to focus their attention on their work • keep trying even when they get discouraged or face setbacks • work effectively with other students and adults • be good communicators and problem-solvers Specific skills : – recognizing and managing emotions – developing caring and concern for others – establishing positive relationships – making responsible decisions – handling challenging situations constructively and ethically
  16. 16. 1st Question: What is Worth Knowing & Experiencing? • What’s worth young people in your programs knowing and experiencing when it comes to STEM? • What are our youth looking for in STEM experiences? • What activities will best serve students’ needs? • How can we build positive youth development assets through STEM?
  17. 17. Experiencing…. • Students voice and choice • Voluntary • Interest-driven learning experiences • High impact programs in science are specifically – Sequenced, active, focused, explicit • Role models • Relationships
  18. 18. Knowing… • Science is an approach to the world; science is process as well as content. • Meaningful work matters – best of all when it is based on scientists’ real questions and authentic work. • Intentionality: For many students science is often unfriendly- there is a hidden curriculum which disenfranchises students from science.
  19. 19. 5-E Model for a Scientist-Led Session Engagement Exploration Explanation Elaboration Evaluation 24
  20. 20. Approaches That Work • Cooperative learning groups • Hands-on experiences • Emphasis on practical applications • Teaching in a social context • Mentors and role models • Internships and career exploration
  21. 21. Roles & Relationships
  22. 22. STEM Programming as a Collective
  23. 23. State of STEM in Out-of-SchoolTime in Chicago
  24. 24. Pathways Cooperative Leadership
  25. 25. Without Collaborative Intervention…. • Chicago student achievement in STEM in school will remain sub-par; • African Americans, Latinos and girls will remain significantly underrepresented in STEM in college majors and in careers; • Investment by funders and policy-makers in STEM education efforts will lack systemic impact; • Area companies will not have the local talent pool they need. • Chicago’s young people will fail to experience the wonders of discovery or fully explore the world around them.
  26. 26. Impact of STEM in Out of School Time • STEM knowledge and skills • Higher likelihood of graduation and pursuing a STEM career • Problem solving, cooperation, communication skills • Project management, critical thinking
  27. 27. Criterion • Out-of-school time (weekends, afternoons and evenings, summer, school holidays). • Youth in grades K-16. • Chicago Public School students, though not necessarily exclusively. • STEM programming as the primary purpose. • Meet at least once for at least two hours or meet for multiple sessions. • Run between January 1st and December 31st 2011.
  28. 28. What Are “STEM Pathways?” The collection of STEM experiences a young person has between Kindergarten and 12th grade.
  29. 29. Survey Questions • What content is being offered? Are programs providing progressive learning opportunities? • How many opportunities are available? Where and when are programs being offered? • Who are programs targeting? What are the eligibility requirements? How do students get to programs? • How sustainable are programs?
  30. 30. Data Sources • Survey: 314 programs from 111 organizations • Existing Data: 1,718 programs • Total : 2,032 programs 36
  31. 31. Program Characteristics 38.0% 28.5% 0.9% 33.7% 7.7% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% Percent of STEM Programs by Content Category 26% 5% 69% Percent of STEM Programs by Program Type Academic/Tutoring Events/Outreach "Structured" STEM 37
  32. 32. 77% 7% 10% 4% 1% 1% Percent of STEM Programs by Site Type School-based Park-based CBO/Other-based Library-based Museum-based University-based 94.8% 42.7% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% 80.0% 90.0% 100.0% School-year Summer Percent of STEM Programs by Time of Year Available Program Availability 38
  33. 33. 56% 44% Percent of STEM Participants by Gender Female Male 46.4% 57.8% 32.6% 6.1% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% Percent of STEM Programs by Grade Level Served Participant Characteristics 39
  34. 34. 42% 0% 3% 9% 44% 1% 1% Percent of 2011-2012 CPS Students by Race Ethnicity African American American Indian Asian American White Latino Multi-racial Other race/ethnicity 44% 1% 4% 21% 28% 2% 0% Percent of STEM Participants by Race/Ethnicity African American American Indian Asian American White Latino Multi-racial Other race/ethnicity Race/Ethnicity 40
  35. 35. Where Programs Are Available 41
  36. 36. Where & When 42
  37. 37. Structured Content: Goals & Activities 0.0% 20.0% 40.0% 60.0% 80.0% 100.0% Science (111) Tech (25) Engineering (12) Math (73) 3 or more (131) Demonstration (79.1%) Field trip (87.3%) Lecture (65.8%) Group project (91.3%) Other hands on (93.5%) Competition (34.5%) Fieldwork (20.0%) Labwork (54.2%) Individual project (41.8%) 0.0% 20.0% 40.0% 60.0% 80.0% 100.0% Science (111) Tech (25) Engineering (12) Math (73) 3 or more (131) Exposure (88.4%) Skills (60.4%) Knowledge (84.0%) Interest (58.9%) Mentor (36.4%) Career (63.3%) 43
  38. 38. Program Age by Type of Funder 44 55.6% 87.0% 50.0% 11.1% 53.1% 73.3% 86.7% 53.3% 40.0% 56.7% 61.8% 96.1% 85.5% 82.9% 85.5% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% 80.0% 90.0% 100.0% Government (60.4%) Foundation (89.8%) Corporate Foundation (61.5%) Corporate Sponsorship (36.4%) General Operations (63.6%) One-five years (162) Six-ten years (30) 10 or more years (76)
  39. 39. Findings & Observations • Program providers are highly engaged but unorganized. • Data is hard to access and sometimes doesn’t exist. • Networks of like-minded agencies already exist.
  40. 40. Convening: December 2012
  41. 41. Now that we have some data… • How should we organize ourselves? • What skills matter for young people to develop across their STEM program experiences? • What will the mechanisms be for involving underrepresented and disenfranchised students? • What measures matter? • How do we ensure programs are high quality and accessible?
  42. 42. STEM Pathways Vision: Chicago as a Ecosystem An ecosystem of opportunities accessed easily by a “self-guided” student or a “guided” experience supported by a counselor/adult.
  43. 43. Recommendations: Access • Create a citywide STEM OST clearinghouse • Reduce barriers: – multi‐lingual programs – reduced‐fare public transportation – increase free & low‐cost programs in public venues • Invest in networks of parents, teachers and program providers • Focus on the most vulnerable students, and engage the most economically disadvantaged parents.
  44. 44. Recommendation: Coordination • Prioritize funding that enables organizations to collaborate and coordinate services and learning • Establish mechanisms that ensure structured communication between Chicago Public Schools central office, individual schools and STEM OST providers.
  45. 45. Recommendations: Data • Establish a common language for goals; facilitate collection of longitudinal data and analysis of youth participation. • Use data to set priorities within organizations and across networks. • Provide enhanced professional development.
  46. 46. Cooperative Outcomes
  47. 47. Potential of a Cooperative Approach to STEM for Youth • Purpose: From Competitiveness  Access and Equity • Measure: From “Testing” Students  “Knowing” Students • Metaphor: From a Pipeline  Pathway
  48. 48. Your Collective Question Moving for the Future What do WE mean when WE say STEM in service to youth?
  49. 49. Thank you. www.Lyon-Strategies.com

×