I
T
B
LG

S
E
U
S
S
BOY OR GIRL DOES IT MATTER?
My Princess Boy Picture Book
Description
Dyson loves pink, sparkly things. Sometimes
he wears ...
CONCERNS OF GLBT CLIENTS
(GELBERG & CHOJNACKI, 1996)

Should I change my career goals because of
homophobia?
Should I list...
ISSUES TO CONSIDER
(BOSTROFF, 2005B)
Who do I tell first?
When should I come out?
What if I face discrimination?
What are ...
WHAT GAY EMPLOYEES WANT
(MCNAUGHT, 1993)

Equal and fair treatment in the
workplace
EQUAL & FAIR TREATMENT
(MCNAUGHT, 1993)
Non-discrimination policy
Safe work environment
Company-wide education
Equitable b...
EMPLOYER’S RESPONSIBILITY
(WINFELD, 2001)

“… few hard and fact laws that determine
how conflicts between person’s of
dif ...
EMPLOYER’S RESPONSIBILITY
(WINFELD, 2001)
1.

Management suppor t for workplace education

2.

Needs assessment – What’s t...
WORKPLACE PRODUCTIVIT Y
Out & Equal™
• helps companies unleash the full
potential of all employees — whether
straight or g...
S
N
G
IO
IN
T
L
A
IC R SE
PL FO UN
IM
O
C
ER
E
AR
C
LGB-AFFIRMATIVE COUNSELING
(SCHWARTZ & HARTSTEIN, 1986)

- is not a pathologic condition
-Origins of sexual orientation no...
COUNSELING CONSIDERATIONS
(GELBERG & CHOJNACKI, 1996)
Stereotyping

Gender roles
LGBT stereotypes
LGB affirming symbols
COUNSELING CONSIDERATIONS
(GELBERG & CHOJNACKI, 1996)

Career inventories &
assessment procedures fail to
consider factors...
ROAD TO SUCCESS
1.
2.

3.

(SNYDER, 2003)
Acknowledge that your 4. Check for fit. Match
unique identity is the
your intere...
CAREER ROADBLOCKS
(SNYDER, 2003)
• Client accepts limitations because s/he is
gay
• Client believes gay people aren’t wor ...
CHOOSING YOUR WORK
ENVIRONMENT
“Most people spend more than half their
weekday waking hours on the job.
Deciding where to ...
ROLE OF SEXUAL ORIENTATION
(SNYDER, 2003, P. 14)

“

When you embrace the entirety
of who you are in the world
and recogni...
COME OUT IN RESUME?
(GELBERG & CHOJNACKI, 1996)
1.
2.
3.
4.

Stage of LGB Tdevelopment
Level of work environment heterosex...
CLIENT’S ANSWER:
(BOSTROFF, 2005B)
WHAT WOULD YOU SAY
(Bostrof f, 2005b)
A.Being “Out” is who I am. Being
visible will pro...
FINDING THE RIGHT
WORK CULTURE (BOSTROFF, 2005 A & 2005B)
• Do what is comfor table.
• Coming out in the workplace is a pr...
OTHER OPTIONS?
(BOSTROFF, 2005B)
• You might prefer not to bring your sexuality
into workplace matters at all.
• You may c...
EQUALITY EQUATION
(SNYDER, 2003, P. 153)
Visibility +
Company
Support +
Action +
Talents & Skills +
Stellar
Performance
= ...
WELCOMING ENVIRONMENTS

(SNYDER, 2003, P. 15-16)
“The personal security that
comes with the freedom to
be yourself will fu...
CREATING YOUR OWN EQUALITY (SNYDER,
2003)

Become the best at what you do
Commit to diversity as a societal
goal
Be rec...
COMING OUT ON THE JOB
(BOSTROFF, 2005B)
How can I come out at work in a way that honors
my individuality and works well wi...
ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE
(SNYDER, 2003)

Workplace Role Model
Commit to job and role within organization
Go above & beyond ...
ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE
(SNYDER, 2003)
•

Educate colleagues about the
value of gay diversity

•

Combine likeability with
c...
Black, R. (2005, October 1). Lack of benefits could hinder UW. Casper (WY) Star-Tribune , pp. A1, A16.
Bostrof f, M. (2005...
Employment Equality -LGBT
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Employment Equality -LGBT

1,754 views

Published on

This is a presentation about equal employment opportunities and the rights of our brothers and sisters belonging to the LGBT Community.

Published in: Education, Career, Business
0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,754
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
738
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Employment Equality -LGBT

  1. 1. I T B LG S E U S S
  2. 2. BOY OR GIRL DOES IT MATTER? My Princess Boy Picture Book Description Dyson loves pink, sparkly things. Sometimes he wears dresses. Sometimes he wears jeans. He likes to wear his princess tiara, even when climbing trees. He’s a Princess Boy. Inspired by the author’s son, and by her own initial struggles to understand, this is a heartwarming book about unconditional love and one remarkable family. It is also a call for tolerance and an end to bullying and judgments. The world is a brighter place when we accept ever yone for who they are. “I actually love this book…This is an age appropriate way to communicate the message of acceptance. I fully support you supporting your son” - Dr. Phil
  3. 3. CONCERNS OF GLBT CLIENTS (GELBERG & CHOJNACKI, 1996) Should I change my career goals because of homophobia? Should I list my leadership position in an LGBT organization on my resume? How “out” should I be during a job inter view? How do I ask about benefits for my par tner? How should I handle sexual harassment? How can I network with LGBT professionals?
  4. 4. ISSUES TO CONSIDER (BOSTROFF, 2005B) Who do I tell first? When should I come out? What if I face discrimination? What are my rights? What if I know someone else at work who is gay, but they are not out at work? What if I am “outed” first?
  5. 5. WHAT GAY EMPLOYEES WANT (MCNAUGHT, 1993) Equal and fair treatment in the workplace
  6. 6. EQUAL & FAIR TREATMENT (MCNAUGHT, 1993) Non-discrimination policy Safe work environment Company-wide education Equitable benefits program Employee suppor t group Par ticipation in corporate life Public suppor t
  7. 7. EMPLOYER’S RESPONSIBILITY (WINFELD, 2001) “… few hard and fact laws that determine how conflicts between person’s of dif ferent views about sexual orientation can or should be handled.” “It becomes the responsibility and the obligation of the employer to make sure that ever yone is safe, productive, profitable and valued.”
  8. 8. EMPLOYER’S RESPONSIBILITY (WINFELD, 2001) 1. Management suppor t for workplace education 2. Needs assessment – What’s the company climate toward LGBT people? 3. Match education program to organization 4. Continual reinforcement
  9. 9. WORKPLACE PRODUCTIVIT Y Out & Equal™ • helps companies unleash the full potential of all employees — whether straight or gay, men or women, white or of color. • By removing barriers, businesses can create an inclusive workplace where ever yone is involved, engaged, and excited about their jobs. • The results are a better bottom line, increased retention, and a more productive workforce.
  10. 10. S N G IO IN T L A IC R SE PL FO UN IM O C ER E AR C
  11. 11. LGB-AFFIRMATIVE COUNSELING (SCHWARTZ & HARTSTEIN, 1986) - is not a pathologic condition -Origins of sexual orientation not completely known. - persons lead fulfilling & satisfying lives. -Variety of their lifestyles - persons should not be forced to change their sexual orientation - af firmative counseling should be available
  12. 12. COUNSELING CONSIDERATIONS (GELBERG & CHOJNACKI, 1996) Stereotyping Gender roles LGBT stereotypes LGB affirming symbols
  13. 13. COUNSELING CONSIDERATIONS (GELBERG & CHOJNACKI, 1996) Career inventories & assessment procedures fail to consider factors related to sexual orientation No synthesis of career counseling models & LGBT counseling models
  14. 14. ROAD TO SUCCESS 1. 2. 3. (SNYDER, 2003) Acknowledge that your 4. Check for fit. Match unique identity is the your interests, source of your success. abilities & values Identify where you want with the company’s your road to take you. policies, culture & You have the ability to values. make each of your 5. Explore appropriate dreams an achievable oppor tunities. Use reality. your network. Identify potential employers where you can succeed as yourself.
  15. 15. CAREER ROADBLOCKS (SNYDER, 2003) • Client accepts limitations because s/he is gay • Client believes gay people aren’t wor thy of success • Energy spent on hiding in the closet
  16. 16. CHOOSING YOUR WORK ENVIRONMENT “Most people spend more than half their weekday waking hours on the job. Deciding where to work can be one of the most dif ficult decisions to make…the choice can be more complicated for LGBT…af ter all, it’s emotionally and intellectually draining to hide who you are or to work in a homophobic environment.” Advocate, October 24, 2000
  17. 17. ROLE OF SEXUAL ORIENTATION (SNYDER, 2003, P. 14) “ When you embrace the entirety of who you are in the world and recognize that the freedom to be yourself increases your ability to succeed, you secure your potential for absolute achievement.”
  18. 18. COME OUT IN RESUME? (GELBERG & CHOJNACKI, 1996) 1. 2. 3. 4. Stage of LGB Tdevelopment Level of work environment heterosexism Impor tance of sexual orientation selfdisclosure at work relative to other job values Par tner’s level of comfor t with selfdisclosure
  19. 19. CLIENT’S ANSWER: (BOSTROFF, 2005B) WHAT WOULD YOU SAY (Bostrof f, 2005b) A.Being “Out” is who I am. Being visible will provide me with equal treatment and suppor t. A. = strong desire to target LGBT-friendly companies B. = lean towards LGBT friendly companies but will keep all options open. B.Sexual orientation is only a small par t of what defines me as a person. I am ver y careful about who I tell and C. don’t tell. C.Sharing information about myself is not preferred. I tell ver y few people, if anyone at all. = prefer a company that will provide me with a high degree of privacy.
  20. 20. FINDING THE RIGHT WORK CULTURE (BOSTROFF, 2005 A & 2005B) • Do what is comfor table. • Coming out in the workplace is a process. • Decide what is impor tant in managing your career path. • Workplace culture may change in response to political or social pressures. • It’s OK to change decisions throughout life.
  21. 21. OTHER OPTIONS? (BOSTROFF, 2005B) • You might prefer not to bring your sexuality into workplace matters at all. • You may choose to remain silent or do without benefits because the potential employer of fers a high salar y or other benefits that measure higher on the list of priorities. • You might want to rely on your own research to get some answers. • Do what is comfor table for you.
  22. 22. EQUALITY EQUATION (SNYDER, 2003, P. 153) Visibility + Company Support + Action + Talents & Skills + Stellar Performance = Equality
  23. 23. WELCOMING ENVIRONMENTS (SNYDER, 2003, P. 15-16) “The personal security that comes with the freedom to be yourself will fur ther engage you in your work and, therefore, propel you for ward in your career, and feeling like you’re able to utilize all of your strengths will empower you to be more creative, energetic, and dedicated.”
  24. 24. CREATING YOUR OWN EQUALITY (SNYDER, 2003) Become the best at what you do Commit to diversity as a societal goal Be recognized as an achiever Cultivate a network of gay and straight allies
  25. 25. COMING OUT ON THE JOB (BOSTROFF, 2005B) How can I come out at work in a way that honors my individuality and works well within my current organization?  Access your readiness  Perform at your best  Gather supporters  Conduct a trial run  Consider the timing  Have no expectations
  26. 26. ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE (SNYDER, 2003) Workplace Role Model Commit to job and role within organization Go above & beyond the call of duty to do consistently superior work Support other employees by pitching in to help when appropriate
  27. 27. ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE (SNYDER, 2003) • Educate colleagues about the value of gay diversity • Combine likeability with credibility (basic education through exposure) • Live your life at work with honesty and integrity
  28. 28. Black, R. (2005, October 1). Lack of benefits could hinder UW. Casper (WY) Star-Tribune , pp. A1, A16. Bostrof f, M. (2005a). Becoming visible in the workplace: Changing times for gays and lesbians , Presentation at the meeting of the Society for Human Resource Management. Bostrof f, M. (2005b, June). S traight jobs, gay lives: Sexual orientation and career decision making. Presentation at the meeting of the National Career Development Association, Orlando, FL. de Vries, J. L. (2005). [Lesbian career sur vey]. Unpublished raw data. Gelberg, S. & Chojnacki, J. T. (1996). Career and life planning with gay, lesbian, & bisexual persons. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association. McNaught, B. (1993). Gay issues in the workplace. New York: St. Mar tin’s Press. Gelberg, S. & Chojnacki, J. T. (1996). Career and life planning with gay, lesbian, & bisexual persons. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association. McNaught, B. (1993). Gay issues in the workplace. New York: St. Mar tin’s Press. Schwar tz, R.D., & Har tenstein, N.B. (1986). Group psychotherapy with gay men: Theoretical and clinical considerations. In T. Stein & C.J. Cohen (Eds.(), Perspectives on psychotherapy with lesbians and gay men (pp. 157-177) New York: Plenum Press. Snyder, K. (2003). Lavender road to success: The career guide for the gay community . Berkley, CA, Ten Speed Press. Welcoming workplaces. (2005, October 11). The Advocate, 55-60. REFERENCES Winfeld, L. (2001, November/ December). Sexual orientation in the workplace: Education is the winning strategy. SHRM Mosaics, 7 (6), 1 & 4.

×