International NGO Day           Early Childhood: Seeds for the Future                       23 April 2012      Action for ...
Some highlights from the Sessions1.   Integrated holistic approach and inclusiveness2.   Child-centered approach (e.g. ‘fo...
UNESCO and ECCE“Learning begins at birth” – EFA Goal 1         ++ Following up on our Moscow commitment ++•Two key conside...
Examples: UNESCO working with partners• Collaboration with the Consultative Group on  ECCD (CG-ECCD)• Inter-agency project...
UNESCO’s new Directives concerning            partnership with NGOs• Adopted by the General Conference in November 2011.  ...
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Maki h unesco.ecce ngo gaw seminar

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  • This is taken from 36C/5. Examples are from HQ. Please feel free to replace them or add activities in your region/cluster/country. 36 C/5 says: [In ECCE] two main approaches will be taken. First, UNESCO will promote a sector-wide as well as a multi-sectoral approach to ECCE, in order strengthen a holistic approach to child development. Attention will be paid to enhancing the role of family members in supporting young children’s development from birth, and to improving the transition from ECCE to primary education in order to ensure balanced sector development and enhance children’s readiness for school and for life. Second, well-designed ECCE will be promoted as an important strategy for gender equality, since it enables mothers to participate in economic activities, frees female siblings from childcare responsibility and enables them to attend school, and encourages equal treatment and opportunities for both girls and boys from early childhood. UNESCO will support Member States to develop and implement inclusive and quality ECCE through: (a) Targeted evidence-based advocacy , including through regional advocacy meetings, which will aim to increase Member States’ awareness of the crucial importance of scaling up and improving ECCE, especially for the most vulnerable and disadvantaged children;  (b) Support to the review and development of feasible policy and programme options and strategies. In order to provide a solid evidence basis for this work, knowledge will be generated through the documentation, analysis and dissemination of good practices on expanding ECCE with equity and quality; (c) Systematic monitoring of progress toward EFA Goal 1. Th is will be facilitated through the development of an instrument for the holistic monitoring of the progress in close collaboration and consultation with Member States and other key stakeholders. This work will be implemented through intensifi ed networking, collaboration and dialogue with partners such as the other EFA convening agencies including UNICEF, WHO, relevant UNESCO Chairs and centres of excellence, and key networks. Special attention will be paid to supporting Member States that are at the highest risk of not achieving EFA Goal 1 – sub-Saharan Africa, South and West Asia and the Arab States – targeting, within those countries, the most vulnerable and disadvantaged children who stand to gain the most from comprehensive ECCE interventions from a very early age.
  • Inter-agency project on Holistic ECD Index: Save the Children, Bernard van Leer Foundation, Aga Khan, Education International Parenting Education Guidebook for NFE educators, in Asia-Pacific – advisory board including ARNEC members Model ECCE centre (Cairo Egypt) to train ECCE trainers in Arab States, supported by AGFUND Bouba and Zaza – cooperation with the Publisher Michel Lafon (private company) and ADEA Working Group on ECD (which is directed by a steering committee consisting of representatives of selected African countries and international agencies and NGOs such as Save and Aga Kahn) http://www.unesco.org/new/en/media-services/single-view/news/adea_and_unesco_launch_bouba_and_zaza_and_childhood_cultures_an_intergenerational_african_series_of_childrens_books
  • (Extract from the Preamble of the New Directives) 1. In implementation of the provisions of Article XI of its Constitution, UNESCO has built up over the years a valuable network of cooperation in its fields of competence with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) representing civil society. This partnership bears witness to the importance of the work of those organizations alongside government-sponsored action in international cooperation in the service of peoples for development, equality, international understanding and peace. 2. Non-governmental organizations are now involved in all of UNESCO’s fields of competence. These Directives provide the framework within which the partnerships it desires to maintain with such organizations may develop under the most favourable conditions. The Directives are designed to make the non-governmental organizations official partners for the development and implementation of UNESCO’s programmes. The aim is to develop a genuine partnership culture allowing UNESCO to legitimize its action, achieve its objectives and make them more visible. Since UNESCO is not a funding institution, this partnership will be essentially of an intellectual nature. 3. The following provisions are designed to lay the foundations for a mutual partnership between UNESCO and the competent non-governmental organizations representing civil society for the preparation and the execution of its programme, and thus increase international cooperation in the fields of education, science, culture, communication and information. In addition, they should promote the emergence of new organizations that are representative of civil society in those regions of the world where such organizations, for historical, cultural or geographical reasons, are isolated or weak, and help to include them in the partnership. II. Consultative status 1. The Director-General may, if he deems it useful for the development and implementation of UNESCO’s programmes, cooperate with any non-governmental organization in the category of official partnership known as “consultative status” according to the admission procedures laid down in section IV. 2. This category of partnership is designed to enable UNESCO to establish and maintain flexible and dynamic partnerships with any organization of civil society that is active in UNESCO’s fields of competence at whatever level, and to benefit from its expertise, the representativeness of its networks for the dissemination of information and, if appropriate, its operational capacities in the field. Moreover, this category of partnership should make it possible to facilitate the emergence of organizations which are representative of civil society, and their interaction at the international level, in those parts of the world where they are weak or isolated. III. Associate status 1. The Executive Board, on the recommendation of the Director-General, should he deem such a decision to be useful for the achievement of the objectives of UNESCO, may admit an international or regional non-governmental organization fulfilling the conditions defined in sections I and II, to the partnership category known as “associate status”. This partnership is established for a renewable period of eight years. 2. Such organizations shall also: (a)have proven competence in an important field of education, natural sciences, social and human sciences, culture, or communication and information, and have a record of regular major contributions to framing UNESCO’s objectives and implementing its programmes; (b) have maintained a continuous and effective partnership (consultative status) for at least two years.
  • Maki h unesco.ecce ngo gaw seminar

    1. 1. International NGO Day Early Childhood: Seeds for the Future 23 April 2012 Action for ECCE:UNESCO working together with partners Maki Hayashikawa Chief, Section for Basic Education Division for Basic Learning and Skills Development UNESCO
    2. 2. Some highlights from the Sessions1. Integrated holistic approach and inclusiveness2. Child-centered approach (e.g. ‘follow the child’, child with agency and strengths)3. Parental involvement - question of the relation between gender and “care”4. Importance of working with local communities and partners + attention to local culture and history5. Concern with sustainability (e.g. use of locally available materials, networking and training of educators and toy librarians)6. Importance of engagement of and support to teachers and caregivers7. NGOs having a crucial role in putting forward alternatives and innovative practices8. ECCE as “here and there” + future
    3. 3. UNESCO and ECCE“Learning begins at birth” – EFA Goal 1 ++ Following up on our Moscow commitment ++•Two key considerations: – Taking sector-wide and multi-sectoral approaches to ECCE, with attention to children’s learning from birth and to smooth transition from ECCE to primary education – Viewing ECCE as an important strategy for gender equality and inclusion•Modalities of action: – Targeted evidence-based advocacy – Support to the review and development of feasible policy and programme options and strategies • e.g. ECCE policy reviews and recommendations – Support to systematic monitoring of progress • e.g. Holistic Early Childhood Development Index Partnership is important in all these modalities 3
    4. 4. Examples: UNESCO working with partners• Collaboration with the Consultative Group on ECCD (CG-ECCD)• Inter-agency project on Holistic ECD Index• Parenting Education Guidebook for NFE educators in Asia-Pacific• Model ECCE centre (Cairo Egypt) to train ECCE trainers in Arab States• African series of children books “Bouba and Zaza”
    5. 5. UNESCO’s new Directives concerning partnership with NGOs• Adopted by the General Conference in November 2011. – Recognition of the growing importance of the role of civil society in every aspect of our daily lives• Simplified framework of partnership allowing greater involvement of NGOs in UNESCO’s programmes – NGOs are considered official partners for the development and implementation of programmes.• A new step towards reinforcing UNESCO’s links with civil society• Essentially a partnership of an intellectual nature• Different categories of partnership: – Consultative status – Associate status

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