Transforming Health Marketing

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  • Pristiq
  • Yet, as digital marketers, we’re still looking for a normal customer – an average user type or a median demographic. We want to simplify things down to something everyone will like and know how to use. What we end up creating is a bland amalgam that few like and none love.  We miss the chance to connect with people around shared meaning or interests or context. To do that, we’d have to walk away from the middle and absolutely delight a niche.
  • the Colonoscopy for Dummies book designed to answer the kind of worrywart questions that Google couldn’t, or the 60 Minutes-style videos Pfizer created to take on counterfeit drug
  • Imagine uncovering the next PatientsLikeMe – a site that is now home to the largest number of crowdsourced health studies in the world, but was initially conceived by two brothers – James Heywood and Benjamin Heywood – after watching their brother Benjamin’s long battle with ALS. They were frustrated that the doctors they saw has so few ALS patients and so narrow a perspective. They hoped that if they could bring enough people together, each entering their own specific medical experience – they could not only help these people with relatively rare life-changing conditions support one another, but also help them act as their own advocates in their treatment and their lives.
  • But in the late 90s, the leadership introduced rigid budget controls and innovation become narrow The new CEO and CFO wanted to find ways to make this big organization a little bit less rigid. They created a “gambling fund”Ideas that failed through the normal screening process could still qualify through the gambling fundOne of the projects that could only find funding on a gamble was The Office, their biggest hit ever
  • We wear a big black hat as an industry. The Harris Poll confirms it year after year. They’ve been measuring how the public perceives twenty-two of the nation's largest industries since 1997. In that time, pharmaceutical companies have had the second biggest decline in reputation (right behind oil companies) – a 43-point slump in the number of people who say we’re doing a good job for consumers.
  • Transforming Health Marketing

    1. TRANSFORMINGHEALTH MARKETING Borrowing the principles of the pipeline for the frontline
    2. I’M LEIGH HOUSEHOLDER@LEIGHHOUSEDepth in Healthcare Catalyst for Innovation
    3. CHANGING THEODDS, CHANGINGLIVESBetter health is run on innovation
    4. WE’VE READ THEHEADLINESABOUTSPUTTERINGPIPELINES
    5. HEARD THE FEARS ABOUTMASS COMMODITIZATION
    6. But even in these challenging times…OUR LABS ARE THE SOURCEOF A SEEMINGLY ENDLESSFLOW OF LIFE- AND WORLD-CHANGING INNOVATION Care Approach Capability Experience
    7. INNOVATION IN CARE new medications in the last 10 years
    8. INNOVATION IN APPROACHAt one lab: Researchers called on gamersto solve problems science couldn’tThe configuration of anelement of a retrovirushad stumped scientistsfor decadesGamers–native in fastmodeling and iteration–found the answer inthree weeks
    9. INNOVATION IN CAPABILITYAt UCB: scientists use the biggest researchdatabank on epilepsy in the world – onecrowdsourced by patientsThe lab receives annonymized,aggregated dataThey look for real-life behavior,unmet needs and other areasfor innovationAs a bonus: the partnership ishelping people
    10. INNOVATION IN EXPERIENCEAt Bayer and Sanofi: They’ve even taughtour medical equipment to talk to ouriPhones and Nintendos Bayer Didget for the DS Sanofi iBGstart for the iPhone
    11. BETTER HEALTHIS TRULY RUNON INNOVATION
    12. BUT:THE WAY WE INTRODUCELIFE-CHANGING SCIENCETO PEOPLE IS AT BEST ANAFTER THOUGHT AND ATWORST A BARRIER
    13. WE BRING THE ICKIEST BODILYFUNCTIONS INTO THE LIVINGROOM Diarrhea, constipatio n, gas, bloating – that’s me
    14. WE MAKE ADS THAT LOOK LIKECONTRACTS
    15. WEBSITES THAT LOOK LIKE ADS
    16. WE MAKE SOCIAL ANTI-SOCIAL
    17. CREATE CAUSES THAT NO ONECARES ABOUT
    18. AND SPEAK WITH A VOICE ABOUTAS HUMAN AS THIS GUYThey may all increase the chance ofheart attack or stroke that can lead todeath. This chance increases if youhave heart disease or risk factors for it,such as high blood pressure or whenNSAIDs are taken for long periods.CELEBREX should not be used rightbefore or after certain heart surgeries.Serious skin reactions, or stomach andintestine problems such as bleedingand ulcers, can occur without warningand may cause death. Patients takingaspirin and the elderly are at increasedrisk for stomach bleeding and ulcers.
    19. AND, THAT’SNOT EVEN THEBAD STUFF…
    20. THE INTERFACE IS BROKEN
    21. THE OPPORTUNITYIS FIXING IT
    22. LEARNING FROMTHE LABFive core principlesfrom the engine ofhealthcareinnovation
    23. 1 FORGET NORMAL We live in a culture of many cultures. Each with perceptions and expectations informed by its own experiences.
    24. The average Americanfamily is a marriedcouple with 2.3 kids True or False?
    25. The average Americanfamily is a marriedcouple with 2.3 kids False
    26. What became the fastest sellingelectronics device EVER in 2010?
    27. ✔✖NOT THE iPAD ANOTHER MAGICAL AND REVOLUTIONARY DEVICE:
    28. Who was the highestpaid man in entertainment last year?
    29. Tyler Perry$130 millionThe vampire guywasn’t even close
    30. THE END OF NORMALWe have virtually limitless options in consumption:• That’s caused our individual experiences of “normal” to diverge dramatically from one another• Today what’s uber popular in one group is likely to go virtually unnoticed by others.• It’s not about finding the new normal, it’s about giving up on the very idea of it
    31. THE CONNECTIONS THESEGROUPS WANT AREN’T “SAFE”
    32. HOW THE LAB TACKLED ITFigured out long ago: Average isn’t enough – Mapped the entire human genome – Started to discover what differences matter – Began making medicine more personal
    33. WHAT MARKETING CAN BORROW FROM: TO:NORMAL SIGNIFICANTOur opportunity: Walk away from the middleand absolutely delight a niche – Map the human experience – Identify significant segments – Create “they really get me” relevance
    34. HINTS THAT WE CAN DO ITThese experiences aren’t for everyone.And, that’s why they work.
    35. HOW WE’RE GOING TO CHANGETHE INTERFACE:WE COMMIT TO: SO WE CAN: Forget normal Delight niches
    36. 2 BE SOLUTION SEEKERS At some point, problems – even marketing problems – get too complex to be solved by any one team. The new opportunity will be to know how to find the people and ideas that can.
    37. WANTED: PROBLEM SOLVER SOLUTION SEEKERFundamental shift: As information becomes richerand challenges become more discreet, no one will beable to solve every problemGap: The people in your company are smart, theyknow your industry. But there are a finite number ofthem – and finite experience among themTrend: Growing number of people looking to definetheir careers on their own terms
    38. FAST TRACKING SOLUTIONSRight people. Right problem. Right perspective.Crowdsourcing Hiring a partner Solution Seeking – Strong professional networks – Targeted platforms and services – Custom recruited panels
    39. SOLUTION SEEKER: 24 HOURSHOME TEAM: 20 YEARSTwenty years after the ExxonValdez oil spill, there was still alot of oil on the ocean floorAfter decades of working onthe problem, Exxon decided tolook outside its walls for help.Within 24 hours, an Illinoischemist faxed in the answerand a day later was talkingwith the people who – with him– could restore the ocean floor
    40. HOW THE LAB TACKLED ITThe lab has long leveraged the crowd to bothuncover and improve ideas – Tons of example: From micro IP to development congresses to public challenges – But the best example is bi3, where entrepreneurial scientists can rapidly convert novel biological insights into life-saving and life-changing therapeutics
    41. WHAT MARKETING CAN BORROWOur opportunity: Elevate solutions in their infancy – Our “audiences” – from patients to professionals - are need- based innovators – The small ways they solve their own problems could point to big new ideas – Finding these ideas in their infancy and partnering with their founders lets pharma bring meaningful marketing to people Looking to the next: Couple of guys who want to build something big just to improve their brother’s life
    42. HINTS THAT WE CAN DO ITEarly adopters of open innovation have increased(not abandoned) their use of solution seeking:
    43. HOW WE’RE GOING TO CHANGE THE INTERFACE: WE COMMIT TO: SO WE CAN: Create marketingBeing solution seekers people want to use
    44. 3 EMBRACE CHANGE How people live, learn and connect is changing faster now than at any other point in human history.
    45. The Fox’s iFamily Christmas
    46. THE TECHNOLOGY WE LOVE ISCHANGING THE BRANDEXPERIENCES WE CHOOSE TOUSE
    47. IT’S BEEN CALLED EXPONENTIALCHANGEBut, it’s really endless disruption
    48. THE REALITIES OF ADOPTIONADD ENDLESS COMPLEXITYOn a typical adoption curve, a promisingtechnology will have passionate users, recentadopters and avoiders at any one point in timeDon’t even get me started on the mashups
    49. HOW THE LAB TACKLED ITThe lab has an amazing tool to understand reallife that’s hard to duplicate: The clinical trial– Multi-phased– In real life - subject to how human’s really behave– Full of unexpected insight
    50. WHAT MARKETING CAN BORROWOur opportunity: Forget about the technologyand focus on real life • How are people changing how they connect? • Where are they spending time? • What new pressures have been added? • What do they need now (that they might not have needed before)
    51. LOOK FOR TRENDS IN BEHAVIORWe have a new hub Multi-tasking is theThe smartphone has new normalreplaced the computer We have constant partialas a digital hub attentionWe’re using our own We do the mathstuff at work And only trade ourThe era of BYO means privacy for experienceswe always have our that are worth itiPhones
    52. LOOKS FOR NEEDS, NOT CHANNELS We’re big on We skip self care commercials But don’t always have So you should do✔ the right bridges to ✗ product placements in health care stream We’d rather play We’re carrying than watch more smartphones✔ It’s just not engaging ✗ So that’s a place to to read all of that advertise at us
    53. HOW WE’RE GOING TO CHANGE THE INTERFACE: WE COMMIT TO: SO WE CAN:Embrace the change in Meet their new needs people’s lives
    54. 4 CONNECT GOOD THINGS The explosion of channels and proliferation of digital media we’ve seen over the last decade have left most of us feeling hyper connected and information overwhelmed.
    55. FINISH THIS SENTENCEI need another website like Ineed a ___________ .
    56. WHAT THE WORLD NEEDS NOW:IS A RECOMMENDATION ENGINEWe don’t want more opinions and websites toread, we want a clear path to the mostrelevant, credible, right-for-us stuff. The best and most relevant content on a specific issue
    57. HOW THE LAB TACKLED ITSometimes as a patent defensestrategy, sometimes as a clever evolution, the labis great at pairing things we need more oftogether – A statin with a diabetes drug – An antihistamine with a decongestant – Even energizing vitamins with chemotherapy 1+1=3
    58. WHAT MARKETING CAN BORROWOur opportunity: Create great collections• If there’s one thing pharma marketers have in common, it’s a strong sense of skepticism• We know what’s out there and what’s worthy of our trust• We could use that POV to curate great collections, to point people to the resources that would help them mostVirtual stores Curated books Customizable Good old-fashioned collections news feeds
    59. HINTS THAT WE CAN DO IT
    60. HOW WE’RE GOING TO CHANGE THE INTERFACE: WE COMMIT TO: SO WE CAN: Help people meetConnect good things their goals
    61. 5 RELENTLESSLY PURSUE BETTER WAYS Today we can create almost any experience imaginable. In this new world opportunity, there are infinite possibilities for how we can bring better support, education and tools to the people who need them most.
    62. WE WORK IN A POWERFUL CONTEXT Their experiences with individuals, brands and institutions can dramatically change all kinds of outcomesPeople are often at theirmost vulnerable when theyare receiving health careThey need more personaltime, more advocates andmore care than a consumerof any other service
    63. WITH BIG NEW METRICS,LIKE PATIENT SATISFACTION ★★★★★
    64. HOW THE LAB TACKLED ITAt Mayo Clinic, they build industry-leadingexperiences by practicing in a design lab• Clinical teams interview and shadow patients• They brainstorm with abandon and engage in rapid prototyping• The project has launched a number of industry-leading innovations, including self-service kiosks
    65. WHAT MARKETING CAN BORROWNo question, this is the biggest, hardest shift to make.Here are two opportunities we can start acting on now:Find our own wayCommit to 10%
    66. Find our own wayHealthcare isn’t like other things we buy.So, why do we act like other advertisers? Maybe it’s time to redefine DTC Do. Teach. Connect.
    67. Commit to 10%Relentlessly pursuing better experiences doesn’t haveto mean changing everything all at onceMake a 10% budget commitment to abest-in-class experience The BBC’s biggest hit came from a gamble fund. The Office would have never aired without the risk.
    68. HOW WE’RE GOING TO CHANGETHE INTERFACE:WE COMMIT TO: SO WE CAN:Relentlessly pursue Dramatically change better ways outcomes
    69. THREE NEWBELIEFSTo change the interface,we have to change ourselves
    70. The question heard atcocktail partiesaround the world:SO WHAT DO YOU DO?
    71. TO CHANGE THEINTERFACE, WEHAVE TO CHANGEOUR BELIEFS
    72. TAKE OFF THEBLACK HAT PHARMA IS NOT THE BAD GUY. Changing people’s lives is an awesome responsibility. One we ought to recognize and respect.
    73. Be informed. Be healthy. Marketing helps inform audiences, transformperspectives and improve health and wellness.
    74. WE CAN CHANGEHEALTHCARE MARKETING Working together to dramatically change the interface
    75. THANK YOU, eDTC!Are there any questions? Download a copy of this presentation at: GSWInnovation.com

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