Urban Health: A Three Dimensional Framework for One Health

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GRF One Health Summit 2012, Davos: Presentation by Prof. Mark Rosenberg - Professor - Queen's University and Co-Chair Global Environmental Change and Human Health Project

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Urban Health: A Three Dimensional Framework for One Health

  1. 1. <ul><li>Professor Mark W. Rosenberg 1.,2.3.4. </li></ul><ul><li>1. Department of Geography </li></ul><ul><li>2. Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, K7L 3N6 </li></ul><ul><li>3. Visiting Professorship for Senior International Scientists – Chinese Academy of Sciences – Institute for Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research </li></ul><ul><li>4. Co-chairperson of the Earth System Science Partneship Joint Project on Global Environmental Change and Human Health (ESSP-GECHH) </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>Urban Health: A Three Dimensional Framework for One Health
  2. 2. Source: The Cartoon Bank and The New Yorker Magazine (2008).
  3. 3. Four Global Change Programs Earth System Science Partnership ((ESSP) Joint Projects GCP - Global Carbon Project GECAFS – Food Systems GWS - Global Water System Project GECHH – Human Health Future Earth One Health
  4. 4. Downstream Thinking <ul><li>Three Dimensions: </li></ul><ul><li>Urbanization </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainable Public Infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Safe Hygienic Housing </li></ul>
  5. 5. Urbanization <ul><li>2009 – more than half of the global population was urban for the first time in recorded history. </li></ul><ul><li>Megacities (greater than 10 million ) – 27 megacities in the world in 2011. </li></ul><ul><li>2050 - almost 70% of the global population will be urban. </li></ul>
  6. 6. What will be the urban future? <ul><li>To date: </li></ul><ul><li>No government has found a way to slow rural to urban migration. </li></ul><ul><li>The rural poor bring with them their labour and their dreams of a better life. </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes, they also bring with them pathogens either with them personally or in the livestock they bring with them. </li></ul>http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/09/11/the-worlds-largest-megaci_n_713185.html#s137732&title=6__New http://www.labnol.org/india/knowledge/after-urban-and-rural-areas-next-retail-destination-slums/1120/
  7. 7. Sustainable Public Infrastructure <ul><li>More than a third of the world's drinking water supply is lost from municipal distribution systems before it reaches the consumer. </li></ul><ul><li>Every year, more than 32 billion cubic meters of treated water physically leak from urban water supply systems around the world. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: http://www.miya-water.com/data-and-research/facts-about-water-loss </li></ul>http://www.labnol.org/india/knowledge/after-urban-and-rural-areas-next-retail-destination-slums/1120 /
  8. 8. Safe, Hygienic and Affordable Housing <ul><li>About 1/3 of the global population lives in urban slums. </li></ul><ul><li>By 2050, the UN says, there may be 3.5 billion slum dwellers, out of a total urban population of about six billion. </li></ul><ul><li>(http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3161812.stm) </li></ul><ul><li>. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Thinking Upstream <ul><li>Models of the animal/human interface in rural areas. </li></ul><ul><li>Surveillance systems to provide early warnings of animal/human health threats. </li></ul><ul><li>Surveillance systems to provide early warnings of crop/human health threats. </li></ul><ul><li>Evidenced-based interventions to reduce or eliminate the animal or plant threat to animal and human health. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Thinking Downstream <ul><li>Models that take into account rural to urban migration and the threat to human health in urban areas. </li></ul><ul><li>Surveillance systems to provide early warnings of animal or plant threats to human health in urban areas. </li></ul><ul><li>Models that take into account sustainable public infrastructure and safe, hygienic, and affordable housing with a feedback loop to rural to urban migration. </li></ul><ul><li>Evidenced-based interventions which especially target the most vulnerable populations in urban areas. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Added Value of a One Health Approach <ul><li>One Health as a network of networks is well-positioned to contribute to upstream thinking but needs to engage with other networks (especially the global change networks ) to contribute to downstream thinking.. </li></ul><ul><li>One Health as a network of networks needs to contribute to new models of heath, sustainable infrastructure, and safe, hygienic, and affordable housing within cities. </li></ul><ul><li>One Health as a network of networks needs to contribute to evidence-based interventions which will reduce the risk to the most vulnerable urban populations and reduce the likelihood of major epidemics and pandemics linked to vector-borne diseases and chronic health issues in an urban world . </li></ul>
  12. 12. Thank you/Merci Source: The Cartoon Bank and The New Yorker Magazine (2008).

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