School of Earth and EnvironmentINSTITUTE FOR CLIMATE AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCESustainability Research Institute (SRI)       ...
Jatropha policy drivers in Mali    National Strategy for Biofuels Development (2008):• “The use of vegetable oil [from Jat...
What is Jatropha?
Major Jatropha project activities in Mali                               Mali• Private companies (MBSA and JMI): oil extrac...
Livelihoods assessments - methodsHousehold questionnaires (n=80)                           &                           Par...
Opportunities and challenges            1. Land use and food security            2. Revenue generation            3. Rural...
Land use and food security (I)  Food security not threatened when grown at small scale  “I always give priority to cereals...
Land use and food security (II)•Living fence: 83% use Jatropha to protect cereal crops fromwater flows, soil erosion and g...
Revenue generation (I)•Sale of seeds (up to US$14 / year):   Low price of seeds: “Harvesting Jatropha requires timeand la...
Revenue generation (II)•Sale of Jatropha soap: bigger revenues (up to US$100 / year)           “Soap production improved m...
Rural energy security •Potential use of Jatropha oil for rural electrification (power generators) and diesel substitution ...
Conclusions (I)          Land use and food security (small scale)• Jatropha can be used as living fence to delimit food cr...
Conclusions (II)“3 years ago [the project] came promising things, now they donot even come to collect the seeds. Last year...
Thank you!n.favretto@see.leeds.ac.uk
Main difficulties and concerns of Jatropha farmers            (n = 30 household-level in-depth interviews)                ...
Uptake reasons                (household-level in-depth interviews, n = 30 )                                  HUMAN       ...
Biofuels policy objectives and gaps Timeframe Replacement Quantity of Jatropha oil   Seeds      Equivalent           of di...
Key stakeholders in the Malian Jatropha activities
Key policies and strategic documents
Key policy themes and biofuels development    11 key policies and strategic documents analysed               3 key themes...
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Nicola FAVRETTO "Is Jatropha curcas energy crop cultivation a viable land management and poverty reduction strategy? Livelihood lessons from Mali"

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Nicola FAVRETTO "Is Jatropha curcas energy crop cultivation a viable land management and poverty reduction strategy? Livelihood lessons from Mali"

  1. 1. School of Earth and EnvironmentINSTITUTE FOR CLIMATE AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCESustainability Research Institute (SRI) UNCCD 2nd Scientific Conference, Bonn, 9-12 April, 2013Is Jatropha curcas energy crop cultivation a viable land management and poverty reduction strategy? Livelihood lessons from Mali Nicola Favretto
  2. 2. Jatropha policy drivers in Mali National Strategy for Biofuels Development (2008):• “The use of vegetable oil [from Jatropha] will not onlysubstantially contribute to the improvement of energy access... but also to the increase of revenues and employment”• Jatropha agriculture will sequester carbon and restoredegraded land Rural Development Master Plan (2002) + NAPA (2007): • Jatropha’s potential for restoring and maintaining soil fertility as well as combating soil erosion
  3. 3. What is Jatropha?
  4. 4. Major Jatropha project activities in Mali Mali• Private companies (MBSA and JMI): oil extraction and sale• NGOs (MFC and GERES): rural electrification
  5. 5. Livelihoods assessments - methodsHousehold questionnaires (n=80) & Participatory methods (n=30) Focus group, Garalo, 2011 Transect walk, Tandio, 2011 In-depth interview, Tandio, 2011
  6. 6. Opportunities and challenges 1. Land use and food security 2. Revenue generation 3. Rural energy security
  7. 7. Land use and food security (I) Food security not threatened when grown at small scale “I always give priority to cereals as I have to feed my family”•Small-scale: 77% of the plantations smaller than 3 ha•Land trade-offs? No (82% intercrop Jatropha with cereals) JATROPHA INTERCROPPING: Transect walk, Karaya-T., 2011
  8. 8. Land use and food security (II)•Living fence: 83% use Jatropha to protect cereal crops fromwater flows, soil erosion and grazing animals JATROPHA LIVING FENCES: Transect walk, Tandio 2011 (left) and Kouri 2010 (right)
  9. 9. Revenue generation (I)•Sale of seeds (up to US$14 / year): Low price of seeds: “Harvesting Jatropha requires timeand labour... I do not harvest because it is not profitable”•Jatropha vs. cotton: “The revenue from 1 hectare of cotton is bigger than theone coming from 5 years of work with Jatropha”UNHARVESTED JATROPHA: Transect walk, Garalo, 2011 COTTON FARMERS: Transect walk, Kita, 2011
  10. 10. Revenue generation (II)•Sale of Jatropha soap: bigger revenues (up to US$100 / year) “Soap production improved my life” (n=3) SOAP PRODUCTION: In-depth interview, Kita 2011 and 2010
  11. 11. Rural energy security •Potential use of Jatropha oil for rural electrification (power generators) and diesel substitution (grinding machines)  Challenges: - Projects (and plantations) are still young; - Low yields and limited feedstock availability.POWER GENERATOR: Semi-structured interview, Garalo, 2010 MULTIFUNCTIONAL PLATFORM: Garalo, 2010
  12. 12. Conclusions (I) Land use and food security (small scale)• Jatropha can be used as living fence to delimit food crops and stop soil erosion• Food security not threatened• Competition for labour, not for land Revenue generation• Sale of seeds alone is not profitable for smallholders  Other uses of Jatropha (soap production) are important• Trade-off between Jatropha and cotton Rural energy security• Household level constraints in cultivation must be overcome to improve yields and feedstock production
  13. 13. Conclusions (II)“3 years ago [the project] came promising things, now they donot even come to collect the seeds. Last year I did not evenharvest... If they keep disregarding us, I will abandon Jatropha” Jatropha is not a “miracle crop”Adequate farmer support at village and household levels is key!
  14. 14. Thank you!n.favretto@see.leeds.ac.uk
  15. 15. Main difficulties and concerns of Jatropha farmers (n = 30 household-level in-depth interviews) Difficulties No. Price is too low 25 Lack of agricultural equipment and fertilizer 16 Young trees are attacked by termites 13 Lack of support from the project developer 11 Lack of labour 7 Wild fires 5 Difficult access to water for tree nursery 4 The promised benefits have not yet materialized 4
  16. 16. Uptake reasons (household-level in-depth interviews, n = 30 ) HUMAN Making traditional drugs (4) Agricultural training (1) SOCIAL NATURAL(0) Stopping soil erosion (11) Capital Reducing deforestation (3) Assets Fighting climate change (1) PHYSICAL FINANCIAL Demarcating property (25) Generating revenues (22) Producing fuel (18) Producing soap (21) Producing fertilizer (11) Substituting cotton (12)
  17. 17. Biofuels policy objectives and gaps Timeframe Replacement Quantity of Jatropha oil Seeds Equivalent of diesel with (million litres)/year productivity Jatropha Jatropha oil (T/ha) (ha)2008-2013 10% 39 3.125 71,6802014-2018 15% 56 6.25 53,7602019-2023 20% 84 9.375 47.787•Actual yields (1.5 T/ha) notably smaller than predicted (3.1 T/ha)•5,000 ha total cultivated area of Jatropha in 2012 (vs. 70,000 ha)“The problem is that the institutions have focused their goals on oil productionwithout even doing research on the tree first. The only research they did is on theuse of the oil on engines, but the oil comes from the tree ...how can you make anengine work if the tree is not producing enough oil?” (semi-structured interview, IPR, 2012)
  18. 18. Key stakeholders in the Malian Jatropha activities
  19. 19. Key policies and strategic documents
  20. 20. Key policy themes and biofuels development 11 key policies and strategic documents analysed  3 key themes and 9 sub-themes identified 11Poverty reduction, rural development and gender empowerment 10 Renewable energy access and supply 9 Food security, agricultural diversification and productivity 7 Deforestation 6 Capacity building and renewable energy governance 5 Renewable energy R&D 5 Climate change and pollution 5 Desertification, degradation and soil fertility 5 Water use and irrigation

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