Ubiquitous technology to facilitate preparedness, practice, and situational awareness before, during, and after disasters

480 views

Published on

Helen T SULLIVAN1, Markku T HÄKKINEN2

1Rider University, United States of America; 2University of Jyväskylä & ETS

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
480
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
23
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Ubiquitous technology to facilitate preparedness, practice, and situational awareness before, during, and after disasters

  1. 1. Helen Sullivan , PhD – Rider University & University of JyväskyläMark Häkkinen, PhD –University of Jyväskylä
  2. 2. u·biq·ui·tous ɪ/yuˈbkwɪtəs/Adjectiveexisting or being everywhere, especially at the same time;omnipresent.
  3. 3.  During 2012, the number of mobile phone connections worldwide is expected to reach 6 billion Soon the equivalent of one mobile phone connection for each of our planet’s inhabitants The majority of people worldwide will either have direct access to a mobile device, or be within the family or social network of someone who does.
  4. 4.  Phones are getting smarter Phones need to be smart-enough but not necessarily smart phones Digital divide? Rather than “Haves and Have Nots” perhaps better to think of “Have now, Have later” in terms of technologies
  5. 5.  Background to Workshop Goals Research: Two examples Working Discussion
  6. 6.  First Workshop at IDRC 2007: Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Second Workshop at IDRC 2008: Focusing on Behavioral Science Third Workshop at IDRC 2010: Mobile Technologies
  7. 7.  Identify Research Gaps in use of Mobile Technologies What do we know, not know, and need to know? Discussion! We want to hear your ideas. This is a WORKshop A journal paper (co-authors welcome) is planned
  8. 8.  http://www.psydrr.org/workshop2012/
  9. 9. http://xkcd.com/723/
  10. 10. Tweets about DC quakereach New York before the groundmovement
  11. 11. On 27.2, Tweets related tothe tsunami warning wereoccurring at a rate ofseveral thousand perminute!!
  12. 12.  Traditional Preparedness channels:  Broadcast Media (TV & Radio)  Print Media Shift to New Media  Web  Social Media  Podcasts  Non-live media Ad hoc vs formal Notification Networks 13
  13. 13.  Decline of newspapers Decline of local radio in many markets Non-live media User selected (personalized) content iPod isolation Digital Arrogance – exclusivity of information 14
  14. 14.  Motivating a population at risk is a key to preparedness Low probability events are particularly challenging Experience is the best motivator Indigenous Peoples – oral story telling
  15. 15.  From simple board games to immersive virtual environments Practice and Rehearsal, with motivation of game play
  16. 16.  Contact  Mark Hakkinen – mhakkinen@acm.org  Helen Sullivan – hsullivan@rider.edu

×