GLEWS The Global Early Warning System for Major Animal Diseases including Zoonoses Julio Pinto Animal Health Officer  FAO,...
Food demand growth and changing patterns of food consumption and demand (9 billion people in 2050) Globalization of food s...
<ul><ul><li>The increased emergence and re-emergence of infectious diseases is driven by factors including livestock and h...
increasing  source of outbreak-related information verification  early and effective response
<ul><li>GLEWS is a  joint FAO, OIE and WHO initiative  which combines the strengths of the three organizations to achieve ...
 
GLEWS reference list of priority diseases/pathogens New World Screwworm Nipah Virus * Old World Screwworm Peste des Petits...
GLEWS is supported by regional/national networks <ul><li>FAO UN (191 Member Nations) </li></ul><ul><li>WHO UN (194 Member ...
An integrated GLEWS platform GLEWS Platform GLEWS Public Website GLEWS Public Events <ul><li>Restricted to the GLEWS Taskf...
 
GLEWS  support rapid response of FAO/OIE CMC-AH and WHO GAR
GLEWS : The future <ul><li>Joint risk assessment at the animal/human/ecosystem interface </li></ul><ul><li>Wildlife Health...
Added value to One Health <ul><li>Since 2006, GLEWS have been visionary in promoting collaboration and coordination betwee...
<ul><li>glews@fao.org  </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address]   </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>www.glews.n...
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The Joint FAO/OIE/WHO Global Early Warning System for Animal Diseases: One Health Tool

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GRF One Health Summit 2012, Davos: Presentation by Julio PINTO, Food And Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

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  • Disease emergence and spread do not respect geographical boundaries, and animals are often implicated as the source of human infection. Zoonotic disease management therefore requires an integrated approach that involves different sectors; mainly human, animal and food. Efficient early warning and forecasting of zoonotic disease trends through functional surveillance systems is key to effective containment and control. Early intervention during a disease epidemic often leads to better outcomes with reduced disease burden and associated economic impact.
  • we would need to be very careful with disease information on internet:disease intelligence is key.
  • The Joint FAO/OIE/WHO Global Early Warning System for Animal Diseases: One Health Tool

    1. 1. GLEWS The Global Early Warning System for Major Animal Diseases including Zoonoses Julio Pinto Animal Health Officer FAO, Rome
    2. 2. Food demand growth and changing patterns of food consumption and demand (9 billion people in 2050) Globalization of food systems, agro industrialization and economic concentration in industry Encroachment of livestock, wildlife and people Growing economies and integrated/high density livestock systems and integrated food chains Climate change and increased emergence of vector borne diseases Major Global Trends and Animal Diseases Risks
    3. 3. <ul><ul><li>The increased emergence and re-emergence of infectious diseases is driven by factors including livestock and human population distributions, human behavior, dynamic and evolving ecological conditions, microbial adaptation, climate change, increased global trade and movement of animals and products between regions. </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. increasing source of outbreak-related information verification early and effective response
    5. 5. <ul><li>GLEWS is a joint FAO, OIE and WHO initiative which combines the strengths of the three organizations to achieve common objectives. </li></ul><ul><li>An early warning system that formally brings together human and veterinary public health systems </li></ul><ul><ul><li>to share zoonotic disease outbreak information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>to share epidemiological and risk analysis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>to deliver early warning messages to the international community on regions/countries at risk of diseases </li></ul></ul><ul><li>GLEWS was launched in 2006 however technical discussions started in 2002. </li></ul>
    6. 7. GLEWS reference list of priority diseases/pathogens New World Screwworm Nipah Virus * Old World Screwworm Peste des Petits Ruminants Q Fever * Rabies * Rift Valley Fever * Rinderpest – Stomatitis/EnteritisSheep Pox/Goat Pox Tularemia * Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis * West Nile Virus * African Swine Fever Anthrax * Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy * Brucellosis * Classical Swine Fever Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever * Ebola Virus* Food borne diseases * Foot and Mouth Disease Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza * Japanese Encephalitis * Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever *
    7. 8. GLEWS is supported by regional/national networks <ul><li>FAO UN (191 Member Nations) </li></ul><ul><li>WHO UN (194 Member States) </li></ul><ul><li>OIE (178 Member Countries) </li></ul><ul><li>Regional Organizations: EC, SADC, ASEAN, CAN, CVP-Mercosur </li></ul><ul><li>International Reference Laboratories </li></ul><ul><li>National Authorities </li></ul><ul><li>Unofficial surveillance programs (PROMED, GPHIN) </li></ul><ul><li>Laboratory and Epidemiological networks </li></ul><ul><li>Other partners </li></ul>
    8. 9. An integrated GLEWS platform GLEWS Platform GLEWS Public Website GLEWS Public Events <ul><li>Restricted to the GLEWS Taskforce Members </li></ul><ul><li>Event Management </li></ul><ul><li>Analysis & Reporting functionalities </li></ul><ul><li>Automatic Notifications </li></ul><ul><li>e-Mail registry </li></ul><ul><li>Performance & Metrics module </li></ul><ul><li>Administration and Configuration </li></ul><ul><li>Publicly accessible </li></ul><ul><li>Content Management System (restricted users) </li></ul><ul><li>Public Maps and Event List (only officialy confirmed/denied cases </li></ul><ul><li>Simple Analysis functionalities </li></ul><ul><li>Public Documents </li></ul>http://www.glews.net
    9. 11. GLEWS support rapid response of FAO/OIE CMC-AH and WHO GAR
    10. 12. GLEWS : The future <ul><li>Joint risk assessment at the animal/human/ecosystem interface </li></ul><ul><li>Wildlife Health </li></ul><ul><li>Food Safety </li></ul><ul><li>Climate Change and Animal Diseases </li></ul><ul><li>Regional nodes </li></ul>
    11. 13. Added value to One Health <ul><li>Since 2006, GLEWS have been visionary in promoting collaboration and coordination between public health authorities and agriculture sector at all levels in particular for zoonotic diseases or emergent diseases affecting animals and human. </li></ul><ul><li>GLEWS is addressing health risks at the human-animal- ecosystems interface to respond effectively to existing and emergent diseases and food hazards of public health, agricultural, social and economic importance. </li></ul><ul><li>The joint FAO/OIE/WHO tripartite relationship envisages complementary work to develop standards, tools and programs to achieve One Health goals and GLEWS has been identified as one of the key tools to support integration of disease surveillance and risk assessment for early warning. </li></ul>
    12. 14. <ul><li>glews@fao.org </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>www.glews.net </li></ul>Thanks to CIDA (Canadian International Development Agency) to support GLEWS activities and you for your attention!!

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