IDRC14-ppp-Stanciugelu-PEP-specialpanel-2608

550 views

Published on

5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice 24-28 August 2014 in Davos, Switzerland

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
550
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
156
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

IDRC14-ppp-Stanciugelu-PEP-specialpanel-2608

  1. 1. Crisis communication – the challenges in setting up policies and guidelines for 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org citizen engagement Irina Stănciugelu Associate Professor National University of Political Studies and Public Administration, Bucharest, Romania Member in Advisory Board of PEP Project
  2. 2. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org Structure 1. The questions – What is citizen (community) engagement? – Why do we need community engagement? – Who are the actors in crisis communication? – How do we foster resilience by crisis communication? – What are the ways to communicate directly with community? – What are the main challenges to adoption of social media as crisis communication tool? 2. The answers are to reveal some of the challenges the we confront when thinking about policies and guidelines 3. The solutions are to find together ….during our panel discussions!
  3. 3. I. What is citizen (community) engagement? Definition • “structured dialogue, joint problem solving, and collaborative action among formal authorities, citizens at-large, and local opinion leaders around a pressing public matter” [1] Role in crisis management • can augment officials’ abilities to govern in a crisis • improve application of communally held resources in a 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org crisis/disaster • mitigate community wide losses Important related concepts • Civic infrastructure • Crisis communication • reference
  4. 4. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org Civic infrastructure Definition • “dynamic assembly of interdependent people, voluntary associations, and social service organizations who can pool their collective wisdom, practical experience, specialized skills, social expectations, and material assets to work on behalf of constituent members and, in many cases, for a larger public good” [2]. • Role in crisis management: • to complement and enhance government’s capabilities and responsibilities. • requires strong institutions with which to partner. Challenge 1 – the very existence of this civic infrastructure (cultural and societal values and the level of civic education and citizenship are structural factors)
  5. 5. Why do we need community engagement? 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org Resilience! Community resilience - definitions • “the capacity or ability of a community to anticipate, prepare for and respond to, and recover quickly from impacts of disaster” • “the ability of a system, community or society to resist, absorb, cope with and recover from the effects of hazards” Resilience is a process that is multi-sectorial, involving multiple actors: “single sector planning cannot solve the complexity of problems posed by crisis, nor build resilience to them” Reference [3]
  6. 6. Who are the actors in crisis communication? I. Authorities • “blue light” authorities (fire& rescue, police, EMS) • Municipal departments (management/Major; health & social, 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org technical) II. Media III. Community (civic infrastructure) • Private enterprises • NGOs • Ad-hoc Groups • Public/citizens Reference [4] Challenge 2 – the level of cooperation and common operational procedures between authorities
  7. 7. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org How do we foster resilience by crisis communication? The mutual giving and receiving of information is a crucial component of community resilience. Information has to be: • Accessible • Inclusive Role of crisis communication in fostering community resilience: • to assist in prevention, preparation and mitigation through carefully designed and pre-tested communication campaigns; • to facilitate emergency response during a crisis; • to contribute to and, where possible, expedite recovery, through a combination of information and dialogue. Challenge 3: what are the best ways to make the information both accessible and inclusive? • refernce
  8. 8. What are the ways to communicate with the 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org community? 1. ‘Classic’ crisis communication – authorities convey information to members of the community in a one-way fashion, often with the intent of educating and informing; feed-back is not necessary; examples: press releases, public meetings, information flyers, websites) 2. Consultation - authorities solicit opinions through surveys, polls, focus groups, and advisory panels; the communication is one-way, the results inform policy options and decisions 3. Community engagement - two-way flow of information between authorities and community, where dialogue helps better understanding of a complex issue on all sides, and where the goal is to work together to conceive and implement a policy solution [5] Challenge 4: which is the preponderant way of communication that is used by organization? what are the organizational resources? there are organizational resources to engage community?
  9. 9. Community engagement as dialogue Characteristics: • mechanism for citizen empowerment (civic infrastructure) • supports community resilience • supplies specifically required information to those asking for it and, in the same time, • informs the providers about what information is being sought The best way nowadays to implement community engagement as crisis communication tool is the use of social media. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org
  10. 10. What are the main challenges to adoption of social 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org media as crisis communication tool? Challenge 5 - Technological – creating usable information from citizen volunteer data is often currently a time- and resource-consuming process – power and network outages Challenge 6 - Social – the organization has to have a culture of innovativeness – the existence of social media-savvy individuals Challenge 7 - Economic – social media as a broadcasting tool is relatively easy and low-cost to implement – using social media for interactive communication it is much more resource-intensive Challenge 8 - Legal/ standards (reference) – legal factors restricting organizations’ usage of social media as source for data and information – issues concerning privacy and confidentiality Reference [6]
  11. 11. PEP project’s responses to these challenges PEP project’s Reports: • Fostering community resilience through coproduction by response 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org organisations and citizens // challenge 4 • Experiences of and requirements for a community approach involving social groups in crisis preparedness and responses// challenges 1 and 2 • Crisis resilience-enhancing technology: a desk study of accessibility and inclusiveness// challenge 3 • Enhancing public resilience technology: a desk study // challenges 1, 5 and 7 • Literature review on technology acceptance related to crisis communication technologies // challenge 6 ……and much more: case studies and Guidelines for Public Empowerment – engaging the public in crisis management! ……and even more: wiki for professionals!! To be find at: www.projectPEP.eu !!!
  12. 12. 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference IDRC 2014 ‘Integrative Risk Management - The role of science, technology & practice‘ • 24-28 August 2014 • Davos • Switzerland www.grforum.org References [1] Working Group on Community Engagement in Health Emergency Planning, “Community engagement: Leadership tool for catastrophic health events” in Biosecurity and Bioterrorism: Biodefense Strategy, Practice, and Science Volume 5, Number 1, 2007, [2] Ibidem [3] International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, Geneva, 2012 , Characteristics of a Safe and Resilient Community - Community Based Disaster Risk Reduction Study, available at http://www.ifrc.org/PageFiles/96986/Final_Characteristics_Report.pdf [4] Haataja M., Rantanen H., Sullivan H., Enhancing public resilience technology: a desk study , Public Empowerment Policies for Crisis Management (PEP), FP7 Project 284927 Report, available at www.projectPEP.eu [5] Working Group on Community Engagement in Health Emergency Planning, “Community engagement: Leadership tool for catastrophic health events” in Biosecurity and Bioterrorism: Biodefense Strategy, Practice, and Science Volume 5, Number 1, 2007 [6] Haataja M., Rantanen H., Sullivan H., Enhancing public resilience technology: a desk study , Public Empowerment Policies for Crisis Management (PEP), FP7 Project 284927 Report, available at www.projectPEP.eu

×