Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery<br />A global response to reduce the risks of disasters to sustainable...
Haiti’s economy represents a decline of 8% in economic growth in 2010<br />Change in Haiti GDP<br />Baseline<br />Losses<b...
A decade’s achievement in poverty alleviation is wiped out in the Jan 12 earthquake<br />Recovery and reconstruction needs...
 50% in social sectors, 17% in infrastructure(and housing)
 15% in environment and disaster risk reduction</li></ul>Socio-economic impact:<br /><ul><li> 8% decline in economic growth
 Fiscal deficit to increase to 7.1%
 Estimated job loss: 8.5%</li></ul>Impact on poverty:<br /><ul><li>: 149th in HDI and 97th in Human Poverty Index(HPI);
 (2001): 76%(below US $2 a day; 56%(below US $ 1 a day);
(2009): 8% decline in poverty
2010: 71%(below US $2 a day); 50%(below US $1 a day)</li></ul>GFDRR is able to help developing countries reduce their vuln...
Good disaster risk reduction measures explain the differential impact<br />-local level <br />emergency <br />Preparedness...
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Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery: A global response to reduce the risks of disasters to sustainable development

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Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery: A global response to reduce the risks of disasters to sustainable development

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Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery: A global response to reduce the risks of disasters to sustainable development

  1. 1. Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery<br />A global response to reduce the risks of disasters to sustainable development<br />Risk Reduction and Prevention<br />Davos, June 2, 2010<br />GFDRR is able to help developing countries reduce their vulnerability to natural disasters and adapt to climate change, thanks to the continued support of our partners: ACP Secretariat, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, and the World Bank.<br />
  2. 2. Haiti’s economy represents a decline of 8% in economic growth in 2010<br />Change in Haiti GDP<br />Baseline<br />Losses<br />Resilient Recovery<br />Resilient Reconstruction<br />Source: PDNA, Haiti<br />GFDRR is able to help developing countries reduce their vulnerability to natural disasters and adapt to climate change, thanks to the continued support of our partners: ACP Secretariat, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, and the World Bank.<br />
  3. 3. A decade’s achievement in poverty alleviation is wiped out in the Jan 12 earthquake<br />Recovery and reconstruction needs:<br /><ul><li>US $ 11.5 billion
  4. 4. 50% in social sectors, 17% in infrastructure(and housing)
  5. 5. 15% in environment and disaster risk reduction</li></ul>Socio-economic impact:<br /><ul><li> 8% decline in economic growth
  6. 6. Fiscal deficit to increase to 7.1%
  7. 7. Estimated job loss: 8.5%</li></ul>Impact on poverty:<br /><ul><li>: 149th in HDI and 97th in Human Poverty Index(HPI);
  8. 8. (2001): 76%(below US $2 a day; 56%(below US $ 1 a day);
  9. 9. (2009): 8% decline in poverty
  10. 10. 2010: 71%(below US $2 a day); 50%(below US $1 a day)</li></ul>GFDRR is able to help developing countries reduce their vulnerability to natural disasters and adapt to climate change, thanks to the continued support of our partners: ACP Secretariat, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, and the World Bank.<br />
  11. 11. Good disaster risk reduction measures explain the differential impact<br />-local level <br />emergency <br />Preparedness<br />-citizens’ disaster response<br />-robust building code<br />-social and economic resilience<br />GFDRR is able to help developing countries reduce their vulnerability to natural disasters and adapt to climate change, thanks to the continued support of our partners: ACP Secretariat, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, and the World Bank.<br />
  12. 12. 70% of hotspots occupied<br /> by people in moderate and extreme poverty.<br />One third of all poor and extremely poor people live in multi-hazard hotspots.<br />Source: Global Hotspots Study: World Bank/Columbia University<br />GFDRR is able to help developing countries reduce their vulnerability to natural disasters and adapt to climate change, thanks to the continued support of our partners: ACP Secretariat, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, and the World Bank.<br />
  13. 13. Main drivers of underlying disaster risks are also the major development challenges.<br />Weak urban governance, vulnerable rural livelihoods, and declining ecosystems, <br />are the main drivers of disaster risks. [2009 ISDR Global Assessment Report] <br />Changing mean state of climate causing increased incidence of hazard and declining resilience<br />There can be no sustainable development without disaster risk reduction<br />Systematically integrate disaster risk reduction into sustainable development <br />planning in all sectors<br />Establish robust policy framework all levels for disaster risk reduction planning and implementation<br />Fully integrate disaster risk reduction in disaster recovery and reconstruction<br />GFDRR is able to help developing countries reduce their vulnerability to natural disasters and adapt to climate change, thanks to the continued support of our partners: ACP Secretariat, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, and the World Bank.<br />
  14. 14. More and more PRSs and country assistance strategies mainstream DRR into development<br />GFDRR is able to help developing countries reduce their vulnerability to natural disasters and adapt to climate change, thanks to the continued support of our partners: ACP Secretariat, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, and the World Bank.<br />
  15. 15. Evidence of extensive and intensive risks drive greater mainstreaming of DRR into LICs’ development strategies<br />GFDRR is able to help developing countries reduce their vulnerability to natural disasters and adapt to climate change, thanks to the continued support of our partners: ACP Secretariat, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, and the World Bank.<br />
  16. 16. Evidence of extensive and intensive risks drive greater mainstreaming of DRR into LDCs’ development strategies<br />GFDRR is able to help developing countries reduce their vulnerability to natural disasters and adapt to climate change, thanks to the continued support of our partners: ACP Secretariat, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, and the World Bank.<br />
  17. 17. Ex-Ante and Ex-PostLending by Region FY 2006-2009<br />GFDRR is able to help developing countries reduce their vulnerability to natural disasters and adapt to climate change, thanks to the continued support of our partners: ACP Secretariat, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, and the World Bank.<br />10<br />
  18. 18. Key messages <br /><ul><li>Disasters are a development issue and therefore, global community incl donors and international organizations must continue to support the efforts of national and local governments to make disaster risk reduction a core strategy for achieving sustainable development.
  19. 19. Disaster Risk Reduction is a longer term agenda and unfortunately, there are no quick fix solutions. But we can expedite this process by moving relevant knowledge into capacity development in disaster-prone developing countries.
  20. 20. DRR community must work with scientific and technological community to benefit from the ground-breaking research and development for more efficient disaster risk reduction.
  21. 21. Finally, there is a need to adopt risk management approach and to better access market potential to manage risks including the risk transfer options for the national treasuries and private households.</li></ul>GFDRR is able to help developing countries reduce their vulnerability to natural disasters and adapt to climate change, thanks to the continued support of our partners: ACP Secretariat, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction, and the World Bank.<br />

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