World Health Organization: health security preparedness

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David Ross HARPER

World Health Organization, Switzerland

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World Health Organization: health security preparedness

  1. 1. Global Health Security Preparedness ‘Prepare well, Respond well’ David R Harper
  2. 2. The global challenge Public health emergencies start for many reasons: – infectious disease outbreaks • SARS, pandemic influenza …. – contaminated food or water • E. coli food contamination in Europe …. – environmental and technological hazards • chemicals, radio-nuclear incidents …. – natural or man-made humanitarian disasters • earthquakes, floods, deliberate use of biological agents, conflict, migration ….2| Health Security Preparedness Team | August 30, 2012
  3. 3. Stark assessment"The world is ill-prepared to respond to a severe influenzapandemic or to any similarly global, sustained and threateningpublic-health emergency."Report of the Review Committee on the Functioning of theInternational Health Regulations (2005) in relation to Pandemic(H1N1) 20093| Health Security Preparedness Team | August 30, 2012
  4. 4. Overview End to public health risks not foreseeable Public health preparedness and responsiveness better than ever before – International Health Regulations (2005) – Regional frameworks such as APSED (Asia Pacific Strategy for Emerging Diseases) But still remains inadequate on many levels4| Health Security Preparedness Team | August 30, 2012
  5. 5. What is needed? Greater emphasis on preparedness – Political commitment is imperative Implementation of existing public health frameworks and initiatives as main approach to strengthen capacity systematically – IHR, PIP Framework, health systems ….. Greater multi-sectoral, ‘whole-of-society’ and ‘whole-of- government’ engagement Country collaboration – IHR monitoring, sharing procedures and resources 5| Health Security Preparedness Team | August 30, 2012
  6. 6. Multi-sectoral participation Challenges too large & complex to approach otherwise – need ideas, innovation, skills, capacities, competencies – need support Need to normalize concept of traditional & nontraditional parties working together Imperative to increase trust – by bringing in those on ‘outside’ – by recognizing and acting on potential conflicts of interest6| Health Security Preparedness Team | August 30, 2012
  7. 7. Preparedness Need to elevate its prominence – from ‘Prevention and Control’ to ‘Preparedness, Prevention and Control’ Need to focus on strengthening those capabilities that are broadly essential for all emergencies Need to prioritize specific risks and ensure preparedness by focusing on unique aspects – for example, pandemic vaccine, severity, phases …. 7| Health Security Preparedness Team | August 30, 2012
  8. 8. WHO Vision Countries with improved capabilities, better prepared to respond to public health emergencies of all kinds8| Health Security Preparedness Team | August 30, 2012
  9. 9. Preparedness, surveillance and response WHO Twelfth General Programme of Work (2014-2019) CATEGORIES 1 2 3 4 5 Communicable Noncommunicable Health through Health systems Preparedness, diseases (HIV, diseases the life course surveillance and TB, malaria) response Preparedness, Surveillance and Response has to be: Comprehensive Multi-sectoral All-hazard Sustainable 9| Health Security Preparedness Team | August 30, 2012

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