Stéphanie Nasuti, Diego P. Lindoso, Catherine A. Gucciardi Garcez, MarcelBursztyn, Izabel Ibiapina, Gabriela Litre, Raquel...
Source: RedeCLIMA │©S. Nasuti, 2012
Sub-Network: Regional Dev. & ClimateChangeSource: IBGE and sub-network RD&CC │©S. Nasuti, 2012Photos: Raquel Fetter and Ca...
Characterization of the sample 80% rain-fed agriculture High dependence on climatic conditions Vulnerability to lack of...
Do family farmers have thecapacity to plan their crops? Little access to adequate weather forecast Mainly “We do the sam...
Responsive adaptation is observed Abandoning the most fragile crops (rice, cassava, corn);adapting the size of the field;...
Conclusion Policies focus on reducing the symptoms ofvulnerability, not the causes of vulnerability Agriculture and anim...
Policy Recommendations Access to appropriate technical andmeteorological information Alternatives to agricultural produc...
Future steps Aggregating data from the 4th case study; Ceará Planning return visits to allow for temporalcomparisons (co...
Thank you!Special appreciation to: www.cds.unb.br redeclima.ccst.inpe.br Funding: Travel support: OASCNPq CAPES Banco ...
Catherine Aliana GUCCIARDI GARCEZ "Climate change adaptation, vulnerability and resilience: four case studies in the Brazi...
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Catherine Aliana GUCCIARDI GARCEZ "Climate change adaptation, vulnerability and resilience: four case studies in the Brazilian semi-arid"

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Catherine Aliana GUCCIARDI GARCEZ "Climate change adaptation, vulnerability and resilience: four case studies in the Brazilian semi-arid"

  1. 1. Stéphanie Nasuti, Diego P. Lindoso, Catherine A. Gucciardi Garcez, MarcelBursztyn, Izabel Ibiapina, Gabriela Litre, Raquel Fetter, Carlos Henke deOliveira, Saulo Rodrigues FilhoApril, 2013 – Bonn
  2. 2. Source: RedeCLIMA │©S. Nasuti, 2012
  3. 3. Sub-Network: Regional Dev. & ClimateChangeSource: IBGE and sub-network RD&CC │©S. Nasuti, 2012Photos: Raquel Fetter and Carolina Pedroso
  4. 4. Characterization of the sample 80% rain-fed agriculture High dependence on climatic conditions Vulnerability to lack of water and drought (Bahia, Piauí,Ceará) / excess rainfall (Seridó-RN) Generalized perception of changing precipitations regimes Perception of displacements and unpredictability Congruent with data collected from weather stationsPhotos: Diego Lindoso, Stéphanie Nasuti, and Carolina Pedroso
  5. 5. Do family farmers have thecapacity to plan their crops? Little access to adequate weather forecast Mainly “We do the same thing every year”Gilbués-PISeridó-RNJuazeiro-BAIlliterate or poorlevel of education74% 73% 85%No technicalassistance95% 62% 69%
  6. 6. Responsive adaptation is observed Abandoning the most fragile crops (rice, cassava, corn);adapting the size of the field; Selling the animals; improvising “fodder” (mixturecassava, corn, cactus) Little to no storing of fodder Migration strategies (people and cattle)Gilbués-PI Seridó-RN Juazeiro-BAAbandoned a crop 54% 45% 8%Photos: Stéphanie Nasuti
  7. 7. Conclusion Policies focus on reducing the symptoms ofvulnerability, not the causes of vulnerability Agriculture and animal breeding remains highlyvulnerable to rains conditions Lack of alternatives: technical, financial, cultural challenges Adaptation actions responsive (to extreme events),individual/domestic scale Aim is to guarantee economic/food security Characteristic of developing nationsGilbués-PI Seridó-RN Juazeiro-BAReceive at least one socialbenefit95% 93% 90%
  8. 8. Policy Recommendations Access to appropriate technical andmeteorological information Alternatives to agricultural production: Payment for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (i.e.Bolsa Verde “Green Grant” for the Caatinga) Income from (solar and wind) energy production; publicand private investments Poverty reduction and reduced inequalities: Education to combat low literacy rates; technicaltraining to support human capital and improvelivelihoods
  9. 9. Future steps Aggregating data from the 4th case study; Ceará Planning return visits to allow for temporalcomparisons (contingent upon securing funding) Preparing booklets for outreach for thecommunities Comparisons between biomesPhotos: Stéphanie Nasuti and Carolina Pedroso
  10. 10. Thank you!Special appreciation to: www.cds.unb.br redeclima.ccst.inpe.br Funding: Travel support: OASCNPq CAPES Banco do Nordeste

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