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Lions and Tigers and BearsThe Vital Role of the Built Environment                OH MY!        Building Whole Communities ...
Jessica Osborne, MURP, MUDColorado Dept. of Public Health and Environment            Betsy Jacobsen       Colorado Dept. o...
Why should we be concerned?
Defining our termsPUBLIC HEALTH                                                  BUILT ENVIRONMENTPublic health is "the sc...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults              BRFSS, 1990, 1999, 2009           (*BMI ≥30, or about 30 lbs. overweight fo...
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults              BRFSS, 1990, 2000, 2010             (*BMI ≥30, or about 30 lbs. overweight ...
Physical Activity and ObesitySafe Routes to School 2009 PolicyReport:•Walked/biked•Walk/Bike                              ...
Physical Activity and Obesity               SPRAWL                                                COMPACT DESIGN          ...
Multiple Connections & ImplicationsBuilt Environment Strategies   Health Implications•   Bicycle lanes/paths        •   De...
A Systems Issue                  Built and     Public &Plans, Codes,                                Our                   ...
Economic ValueTRANSPORTATIONNearly half the U.S. population – 150million baby boomers and their children –may be in the ma...
Economic ValueTRANSPORTATIONFamilies living in walkable areas save  $400 to $500 monthly in auto costs  compared to those ...
Economic ValueTRANSPORTATIONReinvestment in existing infrastructure is less costly, reduces expenses and boosts profits ov...
Economic ValueTRANSPORTATION• Cost to purchase and install bike racks: $150 to  300 each (parks two bikes)• Cost to purcha...
Economic ValueLIVABLE COMMUNITIES   People living in walkable neighborhoods    trust neighbors more, participate in    co...
Economic ValueREAL ESTATE/PROPERTY VALUEWalkable office, retail, apartment and industrial properties command higher proper...
Economic ValueREAL ESTATE/PROPERTY VALUE   As the density increases, the cost of    developing each unit decreases, “with...
Economic ValueREAL ESTATE/PROPERTY VALUE   Homebuyers are willing to pay an average    $20,000 to $34,000 premium for hom...
Economic ValueRECREATION   Mountain bikers contribute an estimated    $25 million to the Fruita, Colorado    economy—appr...
Economic ValueRECREATION   Bicycling brings more than $1 billion to the    Colorado state economy.    [Colorado Departmen...
Power Who has control? Where are they? What is their connection? What is your relationship to  them?
Partnerships•Public•Private•Non-Profit•Neighborhood Organizations•MediaWhat new partnerships are being createdand how will...
PhilosophyCollective vision for how acommunity seeks to design, build,grow, and thrive.
PolicyHow a local government agencyresponds to the philosophy setforth in the Comprehensive Planwith rules to mandate cert...
ProceduresThe system that implementspolicies and plans and reinforcesthe philosophy.
Projects
After Construction, 2010
Completion 2010
PromotionConsistent approach to demonstrate thecommunity’s philosophy throughout theproject.•Invest in infrastructure, cap...
Derby Fall Festival Flyers
Maintenance
“Wisdom is not a product ofschooling but of the lifelong attemptto acquire it.Image Source: http://www.edupics.com/photo-a...
The built environment of a community can create opportunities for physical activity.
Getting to Real Life Oz – What Are We Doing?
Policy Development“Itis the policy of the ColoradoTransportation Commission to providetransportation infrastructure thatac...
Limited Exemptions۰ Bicyclists and pedestrians are prohibited  by law from using the roadway۰ The cost of establishing bik...
Codified into Law June, 2010       CRS 43-1-120
So How Does That Relate?
Implementation Chapter in the Roadway  Design Guide How-to for developing  bicycle and pedestrian  facilities Incorpora...
Implementation       First-ever Colorado       Statewide Bicycle and       Pedestrian Plan
Supporting GoalsOn web site athttp://www.coloradodot.info/programs/bikeped/Bike_Ped_Plan
How Does Active Transportation    Become Mainstream?
Need for data     “What gets measured, gets done”         -- Peter Drucker     “If you’re not counted, you don’t      co...
Getting Started
Motorized Traffic Program• Over 9,100 Miles of State Highways• 100 Permanent Automatic Traffic Recorders (ATRs)• 2,500 Sho...
Shor t Duration Counter
Permanent CounterInstallation
Looking at the information
Looking at the information
Commuter vs. Recreator
Data From 2-Hour Counts
Effect of CountingTraffic Monitoring Guidebook (TMG) Update. These are theguidelines required by the Federal Highway Admi...
Effect of Counting (cont.) NCHRP 07-19 – (National Highway Cooperative  Research Program) An Evaluation of Innovative  Me...
What do we see for the future?
MAP-21     (Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century) Signed into law July 6, 2012 Expires October 1, 2014 Elimina...
MAP-21       (Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century)   Transportation Alternatives combines many    programs that...
MAP-21    (Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century)   Adds eligible expenses such as truck stop    electrification,...
Individuals’ choicesARE affected by the community in which                 they live
Ever y sector of a community has a  role to play in supporting and    promoting healthy lifestyles
Communities can suppor tindividuals in their efforts to make        healthy choices
Jessica Osborne, MURP, MUDBuilt Environment CoordinatorColorado Department of Public Health & Environment303-692-2725Jessi...
The Vital Role of the Built Environment in Building Healthy Communities
The Vital Role of the Built Environment in Building Healthy Communities
The Vital Role of the Built Environment in Building Healthy Communities
The Vital Role of the Built Environment in Building Healthy Communities
The Vital Role of the Built Environment in Building Healthy Communities
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The Vital Role of the Built Environment in Building Healthy Communities

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GP RED Talk at the 2012 Invitational Think Tank, July 2012, Denver, Colorado

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The Vital Role of the Built Environment in Building Healthy Communities

  1. 1. Lions and Tigers and BearsThe Vital Role of the Built Environment OH MY! Building Whole Communities Think Tank July 10, 2012
  2. 2. Jessica Osborne, MURP, MUDColorado Dept. of Public Health and Environment Betsy Jacobsen Colorado Dept. of Transportation
  3. 3. Why should we be concerned?
  4. 4. Defining our termsPUBLIC HEALTH BUILT ENVIRONMENTPublic health is "the science and art of The term built environment refers to thepreventing disease, prolonging life and human-made surroundings that providepromoting health through the organized the setting for human activity, ranging inefforts and informed choices of society, scale from personal shelter and buildingsorganizations, public and private, communities to neighborhoods and cities, and can oftenand individuals." (1920, C.E.A Winslow) It is include their supporting infrastructure, such as water supply or energy networks.concerned with threats to the overall healthof a community based on populationhealth analysis.Both definitions adapted from Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org.
  5. 5. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990, 1999, 2009 (*BMI ≥30, or about 30 lbs. overweight for 5’4” person) 1990 1999 2009No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  6. 6. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990, 2000, 2010 (*BMI ≥30, or about 30 lbs. overweight for 5’4” person) 1990 2000 2010No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  7. 7. Physical Activity and ObesitySafe Routes to School 2009 PolicyReport:•Walked/biked•Walk/Bike 1969< 1 mile•Walked/biked•Walk/Bike 2001< 1 milePedrosa, Margo. “Safe Routes to School 2009 Policy Report, Moving to the Future: Building on Early Achievements.” www.saferoutespartnership.org. Safe Routes to School National Partnership, March 2009. Web. Sept. 11, 2010.
  8. 8. Physical Activity and Obesity SPRAWL COMPACT DESIGN Less Walking1 More Walking3 More Weight Gain1, 2 Less Weight Gain1, 2, 31 Reid Ewing, Tom Schmid, Richard Killingsworth, Amy Zlot, Stephen Raudenbush. “Relationship Between Urban Sprawl and Physical Activity, Obesity, and Morbidity.” American Journal of Health Promotion, Sep/Oct 2003, V18, I1, 47.2 McCann, B and R. Ewing. “Measuring the Health Effects of Sprawl: A National Analysis of Physical Activity, Obesity and Chronic Disease.” Smart Growth America, September 2003.3 Saelens B, Sallis J, Frank L. “Environmental correlates of walking and cycling: Findings from the transportation, urban design, and planning literatures.” Annals of Behavioral Medicine; Mar/Apr. 2003.
  9. 9. Multiple Connections & ImplicationsBuilt Environment Strategies Health Implications• Bicycle lanes/paths • Decreased air pollution, carbon dioxide omissions• Wide sidewalks improved air quality• Street trees • Improved water quality• Mode options • Reduced heat island• Traffic calming effects• Compact mixed– • Reduced risk for chronic diseases use • Reduced risk for obesity• Healthy food retail • Reduced stress & isolation• Connectivity • Fosters positive mental• Community spaces health & social capital• Walkable • Reduced asthma• Parks/trails/paths • Reduced injuries• Greenways • Reduced deaths• Community gardens• Parking maximums
  10. 10. A Systems Issue Built and Public &Plans, Codes, Our Natural Individual Policies Health Environments Behaviors
  11. 11. Economic ValueTRANSPORTATIONNearly half the U.S. population – 150million baby boomers and their children –may be in the market for walkable, transit-oriented neighborhoods with smallerhomes. Boomers are downsizing as theirchildren leave home.[Brookings Institution, 2011]
  12. 12. Economic ValueTRANSPORTATIONFamilies living in walkable areas save $400 to $500 monthly in auto costs compared to those in auto-dependent communities. [Center for Neighborhood Technology & Surface Transp. Policy Project, 2000]
  13. 13. Economic ValueTRANSPORTATIONReinvestment in existing infrastructure is less costly, reduces expenses and boosts profits over the short and long- term. [National Association of Local Government Environmental Professionals, 2004]
  14. 14. Economic ValueTRANSPORTATION• Cost to purchase and install bike racks: $150 to 300 each (parks two bikes)• Cost to purchase and install bike lockers: $1000 to $4000 each (parks two bikes)• Cost to provide car parking space: $2200++ surface lot, $12,500++ garage• Number of bike spaces in one car space: 10–12 [Bicycle Parking.” Bicyclinginfo.org: Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center. http://www.bicyclinginfo.org/engineering/parking.cfm Accessed June 15, 2011]
  15. 15. Economic ValueLIVABLE COMMUNITIES People living in walkable neighborhoods trust neighbors more, participate in community projects and volunteer more than in non-walkable areas. This positive social aspect improves health and economic opportunities and leads to a higher quality of life. [University of New Hampshire, 2010]
  16. 16. Economic ValueREAL ESTATE/PROPERTY VALUEWalkable office, retail, apartment and industrial properties command higher property values. On a 100 point scale, a 10 point increase in walkability increases property values by 5% to 8%, depending on property type. [Active Living Research. (2010). The Economic Benefits of Open Space, Recreation Facilities and Walkable Community Design Active Living Research. Active Living Research Synthesis.]
  17. 17. Economic ValueREAL ESTATE/PROPERTY VALUE As the density increases, the cost of developing each unit decreases, “with some estimates of the average savings around 32 percent.” [Levine J and Inam A. “The Market for Transportation–land Use Integration: Do Developers Want Smarter Growth than Regulations Allow?” Transportation, 31(4): 409–427, November 2004.]
  18. 18. Economic ValueREAL ESTATE/PROPERTY VALUE Homebuyers are willing to pay an average $20,000 to $34,000 premium for homes in pedestrian-friendly communities compared to similar houses in surrounding areas. [CEOs for Cities, 2009]
  19. 19. Economic ValueRECREATION Mountain bikers contribute an estimated $25 million to the Fruita, Colorado economy—approximately 15 percent of the annual budget for the entire Mesa County. [LeCarner, T., 2011, "Fruita Fat Tire Fest: All About the Ride," Singletrack.com, 4 May 2011 ]
  20. 20. Economic ValueRECREATION Bicycling brings more than $1 billion to the Colorado state economy. [Colorado Department of Transportation Bicycle/Pedestrian Program, 2000. Bicycling and Walking in Colorado: Economic Impact and Household Surv ]
  21. 21. Power Who has control? Where are they? What is their connection? What is your relationship to them?
  22. 22. Partnerships•Public•Private•Non-Profit•Neighborhood Organizations•MediaWhat new partnerships are being createdand how will they ensure success?
  23. 23. PhilosophyCollective vision for how acommunity seeks to design, build,grow, and thrive.
  24. 24. PolicyHow a local government agencyresponds to the philosophy setforth in the Comprehensive Planwith rules to mandate certainoutcomes in the built environment.
  25. 25. ProceduresThe system that implementspolicies and plans and reinforcesthe philosophy.
  26. 26. Projects
  27. 27. After Construction, 2010
  28. 28. Completion 2010
  29. 29. PromotionConsistent approach to demonstrate thecommunity’s philosophy throughout theproject.•Invest in infrastructure, capital projects•Maintain investments•Encourage community utilization
  30. 30. Derby Fall Festival Flyers
  31. 31. Maintenance
  32. 32. “Wisdom is not a product ofschooling but of the lifelong attemptto acquire it.Image Source: http://www.edupics.com/photo-albert-einstein-i7515.html
  33. 33. The built environment of a community can create opportunities for physical activity.
  34. 34. Getting to Real Life Oz – What Are We Doing?
  35. 35. Policy Development“Itis the policy of the ColoradoTransportation Commission to providetransportation infrastructure thataccommodates bicycle and pedestrian useof the highways in a manner that is safeand reliable for all highway users. Theneeds of bicyclists and pedestrians shallbe included in the planning, design, andoperation of transportation facilities, asa matter of routine.”
  36. 36. Limited Exemptions۰ Bicyclists and pedestrians are prohibited by law from using the roadway۰ The cost of establishing bikeways or walkways would be excessively disproportionate to the need or probable use. (Excessively disproportionate is defined as exceeding twenty percent of the cost of the larger transportation project.)۰ Where scarcity of population or other factors indicate an absence of need.
  37. 37. Codified into Law June, 2010 CRS 43-1-120
  38. 38. So How Does That Relate?
  39. 39. Implementation Chapter in the Roadway Design Guide How-to for developing bicycle and pedestrian facilities Incorporated into trainings
  40. 40. Implementation First-ever Colorado Statewide Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan
  41. 41. Supporting GoalsOn web site athttp://www.coloradodot.info/programs/bikeped/Bike_Ped_Plan
  42. 42. How Does Active Transportation Become Mainstream?
  43. 43. Need for data  “What gets measured, gets done” -- Peter Drucker  “If you’re not counted, you don’t count” -- US Census Representative, Erran Persley
  44. 44. Getting Started
  45. 45. Motorized Traffic Program• Over 9,100 Miles of State Highways• 100 Permanent Automatic Traffic Recorders (ATRs)• 2,500 Short Duration Counts per Year CollectedEquals 1,800,000 data points tracked
  46. 46. Shor t Duration Counter
  47. 47. Permanent CounterInstallation
  48. 48. Looking at the information
  49. 49. Looking at the information
  50. 50. Commuter vs. Recreator
  51. 51. Data From 2-Hour Counts
  52. 52. Effect of CountingTraffic Monitoring Guidebook (TMG) Update. These are theguidelines required by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)defining how to collect and report traffic counts. Updated once every10 years.TRB (Transportation Research Board) Created a Bicycle andPedestrian Data SubcommitteeCDOT Research to determine appropriate criteria for counterlocations
  53. 53. Effect of Counting (cont.) NCHRP 07-19 – (National Highway Cooperative Research Program) An Evaluation of Innovative Methods to obtain Bicycle and Pedestrian Volume Data (Highway Safety Funding) NCHRP 08-78 – Estimating/forecasting of Bicycle and Walking Volumes for Planning and Project Development Oregon, Delaware and Minnesota following our lead
  54. 54. What do we see for the future?
  55. 55. MAP-21 (Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century) Signed into law July 6, 2012 Expires October 1, 2014 Eliminates “Transportation Enhancements” and creates new category called “Transportation Alternatives”
  56. 56. MAP-21 (Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century) Transportation Alternatives combines many programs that will be competing for fewer dollars (Approx. $700 million compared to previous $1 billion) 50% of funds are directed to MPOs (Metropolitan Planning Organizations)
  57. 57. MAP-21 (Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century) Adds eligible expenses such as truck stop electrification, HOV lanes, turning lanes, diesel retrofits, etc. All funds to be distributed through competitive grants
  58. 58. Individuals’ choicesARE affected by the community in which they live
  59. 59. Ever y sector of a community has a role to play in supporting and promoting healthy lifestyles
  60. 60. Communities can suppor tindividuals in their efforts to make healthy choices
  61. 61. Jessica Osborne, MURP, MUDBuilt Environment CoordinatorColorado Department of Public Health & Environment303-692-2725Jessica.osborne@state.co.usBetsy JacobsenBicycle/Pedestrian Section ManagerColorado Department of Transportation303-757-9982Betsy.jacobsen@dot.state.co.us

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