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New Orleans Index at Six

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These slides go along with The New Orleans Index at Six. The Index provides the most up–to–date data on New Orleans’ transition from recovery to transformation. It is intended to be part of an ongoing series of reports that measure progress and prosperity in the greater New Orleans area with indicators selected from reliable data sources that are regularly updated to allow for tracking going forward.

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New Orleans Index at Six

  1. 1. New Orleans Index at Six: Measuring progress toward prosperity Presented by: Allison Plyer
  2. 2. Disasters tend to accelerate pre-existing trajectories. <ul><li>Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics and Moody’s Analytics (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics: CES, QCEW). R.W. Kates et al., “Reconstruction of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina: A Research Perspective,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 103 (40) (2006): 14653-14660. </li></ul>
  3. 3. New Orleans has sustained three shocks in the last five years. <ul><li>Photo sources: U.S. Coast Guard, LA Times Blog, U.S. Navy </li></ul>
  4. 6. <ul><li>Greater New Orleans is in some ways rebuilding “better than before” with signs of a healthier economy, improved schools, and basic services. </li></ul><ul><li>Yet several economic, social, and environmental trends are troubling, and indicate that challenges remain. </li></ul><ul><li>To further the region on the path to transformation, leaders and residents should continue to leverage rebuilding investments to further reforms, while capitalizing on emerging economic opportunities. </li></ul>Key findings
  5. 7. The New Orleans metro has weathered the recession relatively well, buffered by the “stimulus” of Katrina rebuilding investments. <ul><li>Source: GNOCDC analysis of data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. </li></ul>
  6. 8. While median household income fell 7 percent nationally from 1999 to 2009, in the New Orleans metro incomes held steady. <ul><li>Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, Decennial Census & American Community Survey 2009. </li></ul><ul><li>n.s. = The difference between 1999 and 2009 is not statistically significant for the New Orleans metro. </li></ul>
  7. 9. The New Orleans regional economy has begun to diversify with growth in knowledge-based industries such as higher education, legal services, and insurance agencies. <ul><li>Source: Moody's Analytics (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics: CES, QCEW). </li></ul>
  8. 10. The New Orleans regional economy has begun to diversify with growth in knowledge-based industries such as higher education, legal services, and insurance agencies.
  9. 11. Average wages increased 15% from 2004 to 2009 – accelerating a trend that began in 2000. <ul><li>Source: Regional Economic Information System, Bureau of Economic Analysis, U.S. Department of Commerce. </li></ul>
  10. 12. Entrepreneurship has spiked post-Katrina and remains well above the national average. <ul><li>Source: Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta analysis of Kauffman Index of Entrepreneurial Activity. *Data for eight of the 57 “Weak City” metros were not available. </li></ul>
  11. 13. The number of relatively large arts and culture nonprofits in New Orleans has grown despite a smaller population. <ul><li>Sources: National Center for Charitable Statistics and Census Bureau Population Estimates Program. </li></ul>
  12. 14. A greater share of public school students across the metro attends schools that meet state standards of quality. <ul><li>Source: Louisiana Department of Education. </li></ul>
  13. 15. <ul><li>Greater New Orleans is in some ways rebuilding “better than before” with signs of a healthier economy, improved schools, and basic services. </li></ul><ul><li>Yet several economic, social, and environmental trends are troubling, and indicate that challenges remain. </li></ul><ul><li>To further the region on the path to transformation, leaders and residents should continue to leverage rebuilding investments to further reforms, while capitalizing on emerging economic opportunities. </li></ul>Key findings
  14. 16. The New Orleans regional economy is still largely reliant on legacy industries. <ul><li>Source: Moody's Analytics (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics: CES, QCEW). </li></ul>
  15. 18. The share of adults with a college education in the metro area has grown every decade since 1980. However, these gains lag national gains. <ul><li>Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, Decennial Census & American Community Survey 2009. </li></ul>
  16. 19. In the New Orleans metro, African American and Hispanic households earn 50 percent and 30 percent less than white households, respectively. Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, Decennial Census & American Community Survey 2009. n.s. = The difference between the United States and the New Orleans metro in 2009 is not statistically significant for Hispanic/Latino (any race).
  17. 20. From 1989 to 2009, the number of people living in poverty declined in the city while it grew in the rest of the metro area. <ul><li>Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, Decennial Census & American Community Survey 2009. n.s. = The difference between 1999 and 2009 is not statistically significant for the rest of the New Orleans metro. The difference between the rest of the New Orleans metro and the United States is not significant in 2009. </li></ul>
  18. 21. Housing costs spiked post-Katrina. 55% of New Orleans renters and 33% of homeowners are burdened with housing costs at rates higher than the nation. <ul><li>Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, Decennial Census & American Community Survey 2004 and 2009. n.s. = For renters, the difference between 2004 and 2009 is not statistically significant for the rest of the New Orleans metro, and the difference between the rest of the New Orleans metro and the United States is not significant in 2009. For homeowners, the difference between 2004 and 2009 is not significant for Orleans or the rest of the New Orleans metro. </li></ul>
  19. 22. Crime rates have fallen to below pre-Katrina levels. Still, public safety continues to be a significant problem with New Orleans violent crime rates nearly twice the national average. <ul><li>Sources: Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Crime in the United States; and Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta analysis of data from FBI Criminal Justice Information Services. </li></ul><ul><li>*Property crime data for the rest of the New Orleans Metro in 2009 was not available. </li></ul>
  20. 24. Fully 29 percent of the coastal wetlands that protect the New Orleans metro has been converted to open water since 1932. <ul><li>Sources: Brady Couvillion, John Barras, Gregory Steyer, William Sleavin, Michelle Fischer, Holly Beck, Nadine Trahan, Brad Griffin, and David Heckman, “Land area change in coastal Louisiana from 1932 to 2010,” U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Map 3164, (2011). </li></ul><ul><li>Note: 1932 and 1956 land area data are derived from a different source of imagery than later years. Thus, there are issues of comparability with these time frames. </li></ul>
  21. 25. <ul><li>Greater New Orleans is in some ways rebuilding “better than before” with signs of a healthier economy, improved schools, and basic services. </li></ul><ul><li>Yet several economic, social, and environmental trends are troubling, and indicate that challenges remain. </li></ul><ul><li>To further the region on the path to transformation, leaders and residents should continue to leverage rebuilding investments to further reforms, while capitalizing on emerging economic opportunities. </li></ul>Key findings
  22. 26. <ul><li>The public education, health care, housing, and criminal justice reforms underway have significant potential to raise standards of living, and build a safer and more just community. </li></ul><ul><li>These reforms have been aided by massive federal rebuilding investments. </li></ul><ul><li>Over the long term New Orleans will need a stronger economy in order to further prosperity and inclusion. </li></ul>Leaders must leverage rebuilding investments and economic opportunities to expand on progress for the long term. <ul><li>Photo sources:©istock.com/Daniel Laflor, ©istock.com/Nikolay Mamluke, ©istock.com/Brasil2, and ©istock.com/Mike Manzano. </li></ul>
  23. 27. <ul><li>Leverage competitive strengths in shipping, energy, engineering, and higher education to expand into rapidly growing industries such as oil spill remediation, wind energy manufacturing, carbon storage, and water management.* </li></ul><ul><li>Tap into entrepreneurial networks to help older industries make the transition to new products and services. </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthen workforce development to support knowledge-based industries as well as higher paying jobs. </li></ul>There are opportunities to expand the economy by helping new and existing industries tap growth in emerging world markets. <ul><li>*Muro, M., Rothwell, J., Saha, D. (2011). Sizing the Clean Economy: A National and Regional Green Jobs Assessment. Washington: Brookings Institution. </li></ul><ul><li>Photo sources: http://www.ngpowereu.com/news/alternative-renewable-energy-north-sea/, http://burgundystreet.com/2010/01/19/hillebrand-buys-rival-firm/, and http://www.kdfluidpower.com/services/system%20-solutions/. </li></ul>
  24. 28. <ul><li>State and federal leaders must lead on extensive wetland restoration. </li></ul><ul><li>New Orleanians can “lead by example” by implementing the Dutch-inspired ideas in the city's master plan. </li></ul>Perhaps most crucial to furthering the metro’s transformation are additional flood risk reduction efforts. <ul><li>Photo sources:©istock.com/Jitalia17 and ©istock.com/Anyka. </li></ul>
  25. 29. To read the entire New Orleans Index at Six go to www.gnocdc.org

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