Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Women's Access to Healthcare - Georgia Department of Health Presentation

Women's Access to Healthcare - Georgia Department of Health Presentation

Download to read offline

D. Stephen Goggans, MD, MPH
District Health Director - East Central District
Georgia Department of Public Health

Presentation to the Georgia Senate Women's Adequate Healthcare Study Committee

www.gacommissiononwomen.org

D. Stephen Goggans, MD, MPH
District Health Director - East Central District
Georgia Department of Public Health

Presentation to the Georgia Senate Women's Adequate Healthcare Study Committee

www.gacommissiononwomen.org

Advertisement
Advertisement

More Related Content

Advertisement

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Women's Access to Healthcare - Georgia Department of Health Presentation

  1. 1. Cardiovascular Disease in Georgia Women D. Stephen Goggans, M.D., M.P.H. District Health Director – East Central District Georgia Department of Public Health Senate Study Committee on Women's Adequate Healthcare October 6, 2015
  2. 2. Cardiovascular Disease in Georgia • Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) includes: – Heart Attacks and Angina, Heart Failure – Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attacks – Peripheral/Aortic Artery Disease • Cardiovascular Disease in Georgia  CVD is the leading cause of death, and the leading cause of death for women  29 women die each day from CVD  including 11 from heart disease, 6 from stroke Source: BRFSS 2013
  3. 3. Key CVD Risk Factors in Women • Age over 55 years • Family history of early CVD • Abnormal lipids** • Diabetes mellitus** • Smoking** • High Blood Pressure • Obesity • Prediction • Primary prevention • Secondary prevention (lipids, blood pressure, smoking)
  4. 4. 1Age-Adjusted to the 2000 Standard Million. Cardiovascular = ICD10 I00-I78 (ICD9 390-434, 436-448) Sources: Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, CDC WONDER, http://wonder.cdc.gov/ Online Analytical Statistical Information System (OASIS). Georgia Department of Public Health, Office of Health Indicators for Planning (OHIP). http://oasis.state.ga.us/
  5. 5. DPH Chronic Disease Prevention Section Works to Support the Creation of Healthier Communities through Collective Impact Approaches Community Public Health System Clinical Success Factors 1. Partnerships 2. Shared Goals 3.Communication
  6. 6. OBESITY
  7. 7. Obesity in Georgia • 66% of adults are either overweight or obese  73% males  59% females • Obesity increases risk of death from CHD by a factor of 4 • Independent as well as associated with other factors
  8. 8. Geographic Trends in Obesity, Georgia 1993-1996 2004-20062000-20031997-1999 Percent of obese adults: < 10% 10-14% 15%-19% 20-24% 25-29% 30%+ Source: Georgia BRFSS 2007-2009
  9. 9. County Health Rankings (RWJ) Health Outcomes Health Factors www.countyhealthrankings.org
  10. 10. Childhood Obesity Prevention Priority • Participation in the Georgia Shape Initiative – 29 additional schools have been selected for the Shape Schools Grantee Program – Growing Fit Curriculum used to train over 29 early care education centers in evidence- based nutrition and physical activity policies. 100 more planned for this year. – 3 Health Districts were selected to implement strategies to promote nutrition and physical activity through policy, systems and environmental change in schools, early childhood education centers and worksites. Funded Health Districts include South (Valdosta), Southeast (Waycross) and Coastal (Savannah).
  11. 11. DIABETES
  12. 12. Diabetes Mellitus (DM) in Georgia • Diabetes is an extremely powerful risk factor • “CHD Equivalent” • Diabetes prevalence is increasing • In women, DM brings a higher risk of CHD than in men
  13. 13. Diabetes Prevalence Trend 2004-2013
  14. 14. Diabetes Interventions in Georgia • Diabetes Prevention Program – Intensive program focused on lifestyle changes – weight loss, diet changes and exercise – to prevent development of DM in at-risk individuals • Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) – Increase the number of accredited DSME sites in the state, including via teleheath • Diabetes Screening and Nurse Protocol
  15. 15. TOBACCO
  16. 16. Tobacco Use in Georgia Women 2011-2013 Data Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) 21.4 20.2 18.5 14.0 14.3 12.8 0 5 10 15 20 25 2011 2012 2013 Percent(%) White Females Black Females
  17. 17. Smoking • Associated with HALF of CHD events in women • Risk occurs with even minimal use (2.4X chance of event for 1 ½ cigarettes/day) • Risk drops off quickly with quitting – Mostly gone in 2-3yrs
  18. 18. Tobacco Use in Georgia Interventions • Establish comprehensive smoke free policies • Promote cessation and assist tobacco users to quit – Making cessation services fully accessible to tobacco users • Prevent initiation of tobacco use • Fund hard hitting mass-media campaigns
  19. 19. 2012-2013 Georgia Tobacco Quitline Evaluation 7 month follow-up survey 826 people 74% long term tobacco users – 2/3 used pharmacotherapies; associated with 6 month quit rates – 78 percent only used GTQL services; 91 percent were satisfied with GTQL – Among those who did not quit, less tobacco dependence Duration without Tobacco Percent of Respondents 24 hours or longer 41 percent 7 days or longer 37 percent 30 days or longer 31 percent
  20. 20. OTHER RISK FACTORS
  21. 21. Other Risk Factors Hypertension (HTN) • Extremely common • High blood pressure is a stronger risk for CHD in women than men • HTN is a particularly strong risk for stroke • Treatment regimens use the same medications Abnormal Lipids • Women have more risk from “good” (HDL) cholesterol being low • Lipoprotein (a) and Tri- glycerides have more impact • Differences affect testing; Treatment regimens use the same medications
  22. 22. Cardio Metabolic Syndrome Priority Area Georgia. Working on Health. • Goal is to reduce the burden of obesity, heart disease, and diabetes in Georgia’s workforce • Target is to reduce hospitalizations for Type 2 diabetes and hypertension by 25% by 2019 • Multiple, evidence-based interventions at different levels in selected geographical locations— – Home – Schools – Worksite – Clinical • Diabetes Self-Management Education • Team based care for hypertension – Community
  23. 23. Contact Information: East Central Health District 1916 North Leg Road Augusta, GA 30909 Online: www.ecphd.com Georgia Department of Public Health 2 Peachtree Street, NW, 16th Floor Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Email: Chronic.Disease@dph.ga.gov DPH online: www.dph.ga.gov DPH on Facebook: www.facebook.com/GaDPH DPH on Twitter: www.twitter.com/GaDPH

×