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Eye-catching science: Finding the visual story in your data

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These slides come from our second #popupwebinar on using free tools to create infographics and datavisualisations to tell the story of your scientific data.

Published in: Science

Eye-catching science: Finding the visual story in your data

  1. 1. Eye catching 
 science Finding the visual story in your data Part 2: Making it look good FUTURE EARTH 
 POP-UP 
 WEBINAR 
 SERIES
  2. 2. Quick recap: • You’ve established where this graphic fits into your strategy • Established who’s going to consume it • Established how we’re going to deliver or publish it • Established the key messages it’s going to deliver • Established what tool/s we’re going to build it • Researched some good examples of how other people 
 have solved their communications problem
  3. 3. In case you missed it: futureearth.org/blog/pop-webinars
  4. 4. Design = lining things up? • Aligning the physical & the metaphorical: - Your style with your message - Your metaphors with your story - Your heading sizes with each other - The positions of things - The visual style of any graphical elements 
 you use with each other - Your colour choices with their meanings
  5. 5. Working with layouts
  6. 6. Heading Heading Sub Heading Where do things go? Create a grid Align objects 
 to grid Add items that you need. You can ‘span’ columns where necessary, but be careful…
  7. 7. Some grids can be very complicated, but more complicated = harder to use HeadingBlurb for the the page verit que aspis secusamusam harum aturiscite voluptaquod quam hitat. Sam quatem eicae cus as quiscii scimus ullut pore volorporum dolorro You can feel free to break away from your grid just make sure you have a good reason You can be but still respect the grid
  8. 8. Learn to love space
  9. 9. Chapter 2 Sub Heading20 0.1% 50000 Sub Heading Use open space to: Emphasise section breaks
  10. 10. Sub Heading Sub Heading Use open space to: Emphasise certain information
  11. 11. Type A Type B Use open space to: Group and separate information
  12. 12. Use open space to: Sub Heading Sub Heading 2 Sub Heading 3 Time to think Sub Heading 4 Allow time for the eye to rest in the document
  13. 13. You don’t have to 
 fill every space, 
 let your space 
 work for you.
  14. 14. Learn to love alignment
  15. 15. When an object is too close to another object without aligning properly, it creates a kind of visual ‘stress’ which can distract your reader. Fix this stress either by moving the objects 
 far enough apart that it disappears or align them properly. Example Text
  16. 16. When an object is too close to another object without aligning properly, it creates a kind of visual ‘stress’ which can distract your reader. Fix this stress either by moving the objects 
 far enough apart that it disappears or align them properly. Example Text
  17. 17. When an object is too close to another object without aligning properly, it creates a kind of visual ‘stress’ which can distract your reader. Fix this stress either by moving the objects 
 far enough apart that it disappears or align them properly. Example Text
  18. 18. When an object is too close to another object without aligning properly, it creates a kind of visual ‘stress’ which can distract your reader. Fix this stress either by moving the objects 
 far enough apart that it disappears or align them properly.
  19. 19. When an object is too close to another object without aligning properly, it creates a kind of visual ‘stress’ which can distract your reader. Fix this stress either by moving the objects 
 far enough apart that it disappears or align them properly.
  20. 20. When an object is too close to another object without aligning properly, it creates a kind of visual ‘stress’ which can distract your reader. Fix this stress either by moving the objects 
 far enough apart that it disappears or align them properly.
  21. 21. Learn to love your text
  22. 22. Never stretch your text 
 to fit a space. Fonts have been very carefully designed and stretching can 
 ruin their visual balance. A A A
  23. 23. Avoid complicated effects. It is harder to make complicated effects look professional, so keep 
 it simple, unless you have a good reason. It is also usually better to avoid complicated, gimmicky 
 presentation effects.    
  24. 24. Avoid complicated effects. It is harder to make complicated effects look professional, so keep 
 it simple, unless you have a good reason. It is also usually better to avoid complicated, gimmicky 
 presentation effects. This is 
 more 
 powerful.
  25. 25. Avoid body text that is 
 too small, or too big. If your text is too small, it is 
 difficult to read. If it is too big, it can also be 
 difficult to read in large blocks This is too small for paragraph, or body text. Smaller text may be okay for things like image captions, image credits, footnotes etc, but if you make your text too small in a document, people will have to work too hard to understand the document.
  26. 26. Avoid body text that is 
 too small, or too big. If your text is too small, it is 
 difficult to read. If it is too big, it can also be 
 difficult to read in large blocks This is too big for paragraph 
 (or ‘body’) text. Larger text 
 is great for headings and 
 pull quotes, but not for long 
 sections of text. It takes 
 longer to read in a block 
 and can limit your readers’ understanding
  27. 27. Avoid using ‘justified’ 
 text in narrow columns. In wider columns it looks 
 neat. In narrow columns 
 it looks messy. Narrow columns a n d b i g w o rd s messy set to full justified alignment Hendundis aspitis d o l u t o m n i s t i o f f i c i m i , odiciusdam, sinum essin et asperatios restios exceper spidus qui volorum, s u n t i n t i l i q u i s molupta
  28. 28. Avoid using ‘justified’ 
 text in narrow columns. In wider columns it looks 
 neat. In narrow columns 
 it looks messy. Narrow columns and big words messy set to full justified alignment Hendundis aspitis dolut omnisti officimi, odiciusdam, sinum essin et asperatios restios exceper spidus qui volorum, suntint iliquis molupta
  29. 29. Sick of your default fonts? google.com/fonts
  30. 30. “But which ones do I use?” labnol.org/internet/best-google-font-combinations/
  31. 31. Choose the right 
 colour for the job
  32. 32. DANGER! image © Ard Hesselink Red might mean danger, food, love or heat...
  33. 33. GO! image © Jim O’Neill Green might mean ‘go’, nature, freshness or even poison...
  34. 34. BLACK LABEL BLACK LABEL BLACK LABEL
  35. 35. BLACK LABEL BLACK LABEL BLACK LABEL Black might mean death, mourning, elegance or expense
  36. 36. Blue might mean calm, sincerity, trust, or royalty... image © Jim O’Neill
  37. 37. Choose a job for 
 the right colour Use colour to: • Add emphasis and clarity to information • Highlight difference • Create relationships
  38. 38. A kind of default - everything has a different colour Type A Type B What if there are relationships 
 we can highlight with our colour choice?
  39. 39. Try not to think of colour as a decoration, but as another 
 information tool
  40. 40. Why some colours 
 aren’t friends
  41. 41. Colours are close in TONE - not enough contrast is difficult to look at
  42. 42. Increased contrast - easier to look at
  43. 43. Still need help choosing your colours? color.adobe.com/explore
  44. 44. Choosing the right chart type for your data, example 1 fusioncharts.com/charting-best-practices/selecting-the-right-chart/
  45. 45. Choosing the right chart type for your data, example 2 extremepresentation.typepad.com/blog/2006/09/choosing_a_good.html
  46. 46. There are many other visualisation methods to consider, research is key informationisbeautiful.net/visualizations/the-billion-dollar-o-gram-2009/ informationisbeautiful.net/visualizations/billion-dollar-o-gram-2013/
  47. 47. Infographic design 
 process example
  48. 48. Brief: Create some small infographics to complement a blog post on a legal report concerning governance in Peru Brief: Create a graphic or series of graphics to support blog piece on the findings of a legal report into governance jurisdictions in Peru. INTERACTIVE INFOGRAPHIC Complexity of Governance:The complicated multi-level, 
 multi-jurisdictional landscape of Madre de Dios, Peru
  49. 49. RAW INPUTS “…”
  50. 50. STATE OWNED LANDS OIL PALM PLANTATION TIMBER CONCESSIO N REDD+ CONSERVATI ON PROJECT NATIVE COMMUNITIES SMALLHOLDER COMMUNITIES Regional Directorate of Agriculture (Titling) National Ministry of Agriculture (Regulation) Regional Directorate of Agriculture (Titling) National Ministry of Culture (Regulation) National Ministry of Forestry (Regulation) District Government (Permitting) National Ministry of Environment (Regulation) RAW INPUTS
  51. 51. RAW INPUTS
  52. 52. Process sketches
  53. 53. Process sketches
  54. 54. Process sketches
  55. 55. Process sketches
  56. 56. http://www.cifor.org/gcs/landscapes-governance-peru/ Interactive conversion
  57. 57. Thanks for joining!
  58. 58. Need some inspiration? visual.ly/view informationisbeautiful.net pinterest.com
  59. 59. Still accepting submissions futureearth2025@gmail.com
  60. 60. Did you miss the previous
 Future Earth pop webinars? futureearth.org/blog/pop-webinars

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