Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Varkey Foundation Global Parent´s Survey

440 views

Published on

eir child receives – but are less
confident in the overall quality of free to
attend schools in their country
VF Parents’
4 Survey 2018
Parents across the world have high confidence
in the quality of teaching their child receives –
but are less confident in the overall quality of
free to attend schools in their country
• Parents’ confidence in the quality of teaching at their children’s schools is
high globally, with 78% rating it good or very good. However, when parents
were asked about the quality of free to attend schools in their country in
general, they were far less confident with only 45% of parents surveyed
rating them as good.
• There is little relationship between how good parents think their child’s
teaching is, and how good the education outcomes in their country are,
as measured by the PISA international educational rankings. Parents in
South Korea (43%) and Japan (60%), two countries which excel in the
PISA rankings, are among the least confident in the quality of their child’s
teaching.
In December 2017, the Varkey Foundation
commissioned Ipsos Mori to carry out the most
comprehensive global study of the hopes, fears and
aspirations of parents across the world. This report
summarises the main findings.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Varkey Foundation Global Parent´s Survey

  1. 1. GLOBAL PARENTS’ SURVEY
  2. 2. About the Varkey Foundation The Varkey Foundation is a not-for-profit organisation established to improve the standards of education for underprivileged children throughout the world. Our mission is to help provide every child with a good teacher. We work towards this by building teacher capacity, mounting advocacy campaigns to promote excellence in teaching practice at the highest levels of policymaking, and providing grants to partner organisations that offer innovative solutions in support of our mission. The Varkey Foundation is a charity registered with the Charity Commission for England and Wales under charity number 1145119 and a company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales under company number 07774287. Registered Office: 2nd Floor, St Albans, 57-59 Haymarket, London SW1Y 4QX Copyright © The Varkey Foundation, 2017. www.varkeyfoundation.org. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced in any form or by any means without written permission of Varkey Foundation. The Varkey Foundation has invested a great deal of time, resource and effort into this report. We welcome its citation and use for non-commercial purposes, and ask that you credit the Varkey Foundation where you do use our data and/or our conclusions. If you have any questions about the report, any of its findings, please feel free to contact info@varkeyfoundation.org. GLOBAL PARENTS’ SURVEY
  3. 3. VF Parents Survey 2018 3 #VFParentsSurvey EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 4 METHODOLOGY 9 QUALITY OF EDUCATION 10 TIME HELPING WITH EDUCATION 27 PLURALISM IN EDUCATION PROVISION 38 OPTIMISM FOR THE FUTURE 53 CONTENTS
  4. 4. VF Parents Survey 20184 #VFParentsSurvey Parents across the world have high confidence in the quality of teaching their child receives – but are less confident in the overall quality of free to attend schools in their country VF Parents’ Survey 20184 Parents across the world have high confidence in the quality of teaching their child receives – but are less confident in the overall quality of free to attend schools in their country • Parents’ confidence in the quality of teaching at their children’s schools is high globally, with 78% rating it good or very good. However, when parents were asked about the quality of free to attend schools in their country in general, they were far less confident with only 45% of parents surveyed rating them as good. • There is little relationship between how good parents think their child’s teaching is, and how good the education outcomes in their country are, as measured by the PISA international educational rankings. Parents in South Korea (43%) and Japan (60%), two countries which excel in the PISA rankings, are among the least confident in the quality of their child’s teaching. In December 2017, the Varkey Foundation commissioned Ipsos Mori to carry out the most comprehensive global study of the hopes, fears and aspirations of parents across the world. This report summarises the main findings. We are separately publishing reports for each country polled, and all the raw data is available on our website, varkeyfoundation.org for any third party to use and build on. The report makes a number of conclusions. Global Parents’ Survey 20184 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
  5. 5. VF Parents Survey 2018 5 VF Parents’ Survey 2018 5 #VFParentsSurvey Parents recognise that teachers are the most important part of what makes a good school • If there were additional funds available for their child’s school, the survey showed that most parents would want them spent on teachers. Half (50%) of parents listed either more teachers or better pay for existing teachers as being among their top priorities. This is compared with 46% who would spend additional funds for their child’s school on computers/technology, 44% for extracurricular activities, 37% for support staff, 37% for resources, and 34% for buildings and other facilities • The most important factor for parents when choosing their child’s school, alongside location, is the quality of teachers, with 45% of parents worldwide who had a choice of schools selecting it as one of their top three criteria - consistent across both parents of children at primary and secondary schools. Most parents do think schools are preparing children well for the future, but views on the importance of university are mixed. Parents’ worries are more about their child’s economic prospects than global threats such as climate change or terrorism • Almost two-thirds (64%) of parents believe their child’s school is preparing them well for the world of 2030 and beyond. This belief was held most strongly in some Asian countries, particularly India and Indonesia. African and Latin American parents surveyed were generally more likely to believe that their children were being prepared well than parents in most Europeans countries surveyed • Parents’ biggest concerns about their children’s futures globally remain bread and butter issues - 42% listed getting a job and having a successful career as among their top three anxieties for their child’s future. Money and the cost of living was the second biggest concern (34%). Far fewer parents were concerned about global threats such as terrorism (16%) or climate change (14%). Global Parents’ Survey 2018 5
  6. 6. VF Parents Survey 20186 #VFParentsSurvey Parents across the world have high confidence in the quality of teaching their child receives – but are less confident in the overall quality of free to attend schools in their country VF Parents’ Survey 20186 • Forty percent of parents worldwide consider it extremely important their child attends university, but Latin Americans are far more determined about university than most. A high number of Indian parents also consider university extremely important. European parents, however, place considerably less importance on university attendance. Parents in emerging markets spend far more time helping their child with their education out of school than parents in established economies. Most parents, particularly younger ones, are in favour of a pluralist approach to where and how their children are educated • While a quarter (25%) of parents worldwide spend 7 or more hours a week helping their children with their education, this figure rises to 62% in India, 50% in Vietnam and 39% in Colombia. Parents in established economies are spending less time, with only 5% spending 7 or more hours a week in Finland, 10% in France and Japan, and 11% in the UK. • Fifty-five percent of parents globally whose child attends a free to attend school would be fairly likely or very likely to send their child to a fee-paying school if they could afford it and there was an appropriate place available. 61% of parents worldwide approve of education vouchers with support generally higher in lower income and emerging countries • Support for pluralism in education providers is universally higher among the younger and better educated. Younger and better educated parents would be more likely to send their child to a fee-paying if they could afford it and there was an appropriate place available and are also more likely to approve of parent groups, groups of teachers, private companies, and religious institutions, running free to attend schools, and to be more in favour of education vouchers. VF Parents’ Survey 20186 Global Parents’ Survey 20186
  7. 7. VF Parents Survey 2018 7 VF Parents’ Survey 2018 7 #VFParentsSurvey VF Parents’ Survey 2018 7
  8. 8. VF Parents Survey 20188 METHODOLOGY
  9. 9. VF Parents Survey 2018 9 Global Parents’ Survey 2018 9 On behalf of the Varkey Foundation, Ipsos MORI interviewed 27,380 parents across 29 countries using an online survey via the Ipsos Online Panel system* between the 8th December 2017 and 15th January 2018. These countries were: Argentina India Singapore Australia Indonesia South Africa Brazil Italy South Korea Canada Japan Spain China Kenya** Turkey Colombia Malaysia Uganda** Estonia** Mexico United Kingdom Finland Peru United States France Poland Vietnam Germany Russia *In countries where Ipsos Online Panel System had low coverage, local panel providers who were members of ESOMAR were used instead. **These countries are relatively underdeveloped in terms of online surveying, and therefore contained a lower sample to avoid over-representing the relatively small online population Results contain 1,000 interviews from all countries except Estonia (500), Kenya (501) and Uganda (371). Data has been weighted by age, gender and region of child and corrected for gender of parent. As such, the survey is representative of parents of children aged 4-18 in education, based on these characteristics, with equal views from mothers and fathers. All countries contribute equally to the total global average. Data has not been adjusted for the relative size of population. The survey was conducted online. For countries where internet penetration is low (such as India, Uganda, Kenya, Peru and Indonesia), it is important to note that the data is representative of the urban online population, which tends to be better educated and financially better off.
  10. 10. Global Parents’ Survey 201810 01. QUALITY OF EDUCATION
  11. 11. How would you rate the quality of teaching at your child’s current school? 11ic PISA 2015* N/A 496 N/A 534 509 531 510 403 401 N/A 528 475 416 556 N/A 493 N/A 481 N/A 495 525 416 501 N/A 397 425 538 509 487 5165% 8% 8% 7% 6% 2% 5% 8% 2% 2% 5% 5% 6% 2% 3% 14% 3% 1% 4% 5% 5% 4% 1% 5% 3% 4% 3% 5% 3% 2% 43% 48% 57% 61% 72% 75% 75% 75% 76% 77% 78% 78% 78% 78% 79% 80% 80% 83% 84% 84% 84% 85% 86% 86% 87% 87% 87% 87% 91% 92% South Korea Russia Germany Japan Turkey Peru Malaysia Poland Mexico Vietnam France GLOBAL AVERAGE Italy China Spain Uganda Singapore Colombia Argentina Canada South Africa Brazil Indonesia Australia Finland United Kingdom Estonia India United States Kenya % rating quality as 'fairly poor'/'very poor' % rating quality as 'fairly good'/'very good' rate the quality ur child’s e in the quality of hildren’s schools h 78% rating it y good.’ not always align e 2015 formance/share of top performers /economies with a share of low e OECD average an performance/share of top ignificantly different from the OECD ge formance/share of top performers /economies with a share of low e OECD average Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. Global Parents’ Survey 2018 11 Parents’ confidence in the quality of teaching at their children’s schools is high globally, with 78% rating it ‘fairly good’ or ‘very good.’ However, this does not always align to PISA rankings. Countries/economies with a mean performance/share of top performers above the OECD average; countries/economies with a share of low achievers below the OECD average Countries/economies with a mean performance/share of top performers/share of low achievers not significantly different from the OECD average Countries/economies with a mean performance/share of top performers below the OECD average; countries/economies with a share of low achievers above the OECD average *Mean science score in PISA Science 2015 #VFParentsSurvey
  12. 12. Global Parents’ Survey 201812 12c 1% 1% 1% 1% 2% 4% 4% 4% 5% 5% 5% 5% 6% 6% 6% 7% 7% 7% 8% 8% 11% 13% 18% 7% 6% 5% 2% 2% 1% 1% Mexico Russia Vietnam Peru Indonesia Japan Colombia China Singapore India Spain Argentina GLOBAL AVERAGE Australia Canada United States United Kingdom Estonia Finland Germany Kenya Turkey Brazil South Africa Malaysia France Italy Uganda Poland South Korea Difference between rating % 'good' for primary and % 'good' for secondary school Child at primary school Child at secondary school 51% 33% 81% 68% 83% 72% 82% 74% 82% 74% 78% 71% 87% 80% 88% 81% 75% 69% 94% 88% 61% 55% 89% 84% 90% 85% 90% 85% 94% 89% 86% 82% 88% 84% 80% 76% 85% 83% 79% 78% 88% 87% 81% 80% 79% 78% 82% 83% 60% 61% 85% 87% 74% 76% 74% 79% 45% 51% 73% 80% Base: Parents of children in primary schools (14464), parents of children in secondary schools (12916). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. Primary higherSecondary higherate the quality ur child’s parents of schools are those with ary schools. nt in South Uganda. se is true in Vietnam. In most countries, parents of children at primary schools are more positive than those with children at secondary schools. This is most apparent in South Korea, Poland and Uganda. However the reverse is true in Mexico, Russia and Vietnam. How would you rate the quality of teaching at your child’s current school? by phase #VFParentsSurvey
  13. 13. How would you rate the quality of teaching at your child’s current school? by type of school 13al - Public 3% 4% 5% 6% 6% 7% 8% 8% 10% 10% 10% 11% 12% 13% 13% 14% 14% 17% 19% 20% 23% 23% 24% 29% 58% 12% 8% 3% 1% 0% South Korea Estonia Finland China Singapore United Kingdom Australia Indonesia Canada Kenya Malaysia United States Japan France Russia India Spain GLOBAL AVERAGE Peru Vietnam Poland Argentina Colombia Italy Brazil Germany Mexico Turkey South Africa Uganda Difference between rating % 'good' for free to attend school and % 'good' for fee paying school Child at free to attend Child at fee paying 32% 90% 60% 89% 67% 91% 67% 90% 56% 79% 76% 96% 76% 95% 74% 91% 77% 91% 74% 88% 67% 80% 66% 79% 73% 85% 76% 87% 79% 89% 47% 57% 76% 86% 59% 67% 90% 98% 73% 80% 87% 93% 83% 89% 83% 88% 85% 89% 87% 90% 80% 80% 79% 78% 87% 84% 88% 80% 48% 36% Base: Parents of children in free to attend schools (16767), parents of children in fee paying schools (10002). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. Fee paying higherFree to attend higherou rate the ching at your school? ool es, parents of paying schools give or quality of hose with children d schools. gapore, China, and South Korea, ren at fee paying more positive. In most countries, parents of children at fee paying schools give higher ratings for quality of teaching than those with children at free to attend schools. However, in Singapore, China, Finland, Estonia and South Korea, those with children at fee paying schools are no more positive. Global Parents’ Survey 2018 13 #VFParentsSurvey
  14. 14. Global Parents’ Survey 201814 Global Parents’ Survey 201814 14- Public 38% 35% 66% 38% 54% 28% 51% 28% 24% 12% 31% 34% 15% 30% 23% 24% 34% 14% 18% 24% 16% 10% 9% 17% 10% 13% 12% 5% 4% 3% 14% 18% 20% 24% 25% 27% 28% 30% 30% 33% 34% 34% 36% 39% 39% 45% 47% 47% 51% 51% 55% 56% 58% 62% 68% 69% 69% 73% 78% 90% Peru Mexico Uganda Turkey South Africa Russia Brazil Colombia Germany South Korea Italy Argentina Japan France Spain GLOBAL AVERAGE India Vietnam Poland Kenya Malaysia Indonesia China United States United Kingdom Australia Canada Singapore Estonia Finland % rating quality as 'fairly poor'/'very poor' % rating quality as 'fairly good'/'very good' Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. u rate the quality d government- s in your country? e views of their own ly 45% of parents e quality of free to their country as ery good’. f parents from frica and Brazil rate ucation as ‘fairly or’. In contrast to the views of their own child’s school, only 45% of parents surveyed rate the quality of free to attend schools in their country as ‘fairly good’ or ‘very good’. More than half of parents from Uganda, South Africa and Brazil rate the quality of education as ‘fairly poor’ or ‘very poor’. How would you rate the quality of free to attend government- funded schools in your country? #VFParentsSurvey
  15. 15. How would you rate the quality of free to attend government- funded schools in your country? by phase 15ublic Child at primary school Child at secondary school 38% 26% 29% 20% 29% 20% 54% 47% 41% 36% 70% 65% 64% 60% 33% 29% 57% 53% 36% 33% 59% 56% 28% 26% 46% 44% 35% 33% 57% 55% 48% 47% 28% 27% 37% 36% 47% 46% 69% 68% 14% 14% 68% 69% 90% 91% 29% 30% 72% 74% 38% 41% 16% 19% 18% 22% 75% 80% 48% 58% 0% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 2% 2% 2% 2% 3% 3% 4% 4% 4% 5% 5% 7% 9% 9% 12% 10% 5% 4% 3% 3% 2% 1% 1% 1% Kenya Estonia Uganda Mexico Spain Singapore Colombia Finland Australia Peru Canada India Japan Brazil Vietnam Indonesia Italy GLOBAL AVERAGE Russia China Argentina Malaysia Germany United States United Kingdom France Poland Turkey South Africa South Korea Difference between rating % good for primary and % good for secondary school Primary higherSecondary higher Base: Parents of children in primary schools (14464), parents of children in secondary schools (12916). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. rate the quality d government- in your country? n is also important el. parents with y school are more e with children at . Phase of education is also important at the national level. In most countries, parents with children at primary school are more positive than those with children at secondary schools. Global Parents’ Survey 2018 15 #VFParentsSurvey
  16. 16. Global Parents’ Survey 201816 How would you rate the quality of free to attend government-funded schools in your country? by school 16c 8% 8% 9% 10% 11% 12% 12% 12% 13% 13% 13% 14% 14% 14% 15% 16% 17% 17% 18% 18% 22% 22% 22% 22% 26% 30% 30% 30% 4% 3% United States Vietnam Italy Mexico Singapore Turkey Germany Uganda Japan Poland Malaysia Kenya Brazil Russia China Canada South Korea Indonesia Spain GLOBAL AVERAGE Peru Estonia Colombia Argentina Australia Finland South Africa France United Kingdom India Difference between rating % good for free to attend school and % good for fee paying school Child at free to attend Child at fee paying 73% 43% 70% 40% 44% 14% 47% 21% 91% 69% 45% 23% 77% 55% 42% 20% 79% 61% 26% 8% 52% 35% 44% 27% 67% 51% 39% 24% 71% 57% 63% 49% 28% 14% 34% 21% 61% 48% 59% 46% 52% 40% 38% 26% 29% 17% 32% 21% 27% 17% 78% 69% 21% 13% 35% 27% 45% 48% 62% 66% Free to attend higherFee paying higher Base: Parents of children in free to attend schools (16767), parents of children in fee paying schools (10002). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. ate the quality of vernment-funded ountry? d States and with a child at a free e more positive f free to attend r country. ost apparent in rance. In all but the United States and Vietnam, parents with a child at a free to attend school are more positive about the quality of free to attend schools across their country. This difference is most apparent in India, the UK and France. #VFParentsSurvey
  17. 17. Do you think the standard of education in your country has become better or worse over the last 10 years? 17al - Public Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. 72% 70% 70% 68% 68% 65% 65% 57% 49% 48% 41% 41% 40% 39% 37% 36% 36% 35% 31% 29% 28% 27% 25% 24% 21% 21% 20% 20% 19% 8% 10% 17% 16% 10% 9% 23% 13% 17% 16% 27% 20% 18% 19% 24% 18% 10% 11% 21% 26% 25% 27% 27% 23% 18% 21% 31% 6% 18% 24% 17% 17% 12% 12% 14% 23% 9% 21% 16% 32% 24% 38% 41% 37% 30% 40% 52% 53% 33% 42% 41% 33% 39% 49% 56% 56% 25% 72% 59% 52% 70% 1% 1% 3% 7% 0% 3% 1% 10% 2% 2% 2% 0% 4% 6% 6% 2% 1% 10% 1% 6% 11% 7% 3% 3% 2% 23% 1% 3% 6% 6% India China Singapore Indonesia Kenya South Korea Vietnam Estonia Malaysia Peru Colombia Uganda GLOBAL AVERAGE Finland United States Brazil Turkey Australia Mexico Poland United Kingdom Canada Spain Argentina Italy Japan South Africa Russia Germany France % rating education as 'better' % rating education as 'the same' % rating education as 'worse' Don't knowhe standard of our country has r or worse over ars? s are deeply divided standards of got better or worse years. ion of Japan, parents most positive about me. Some of the c parents are in the untries. Globally, parents are deeply divided about whether standards of education have got better or worse over the last 10 years. With the exception of Japan, parents in Asia are the most positive about changes over time. Some of the most pessimistic parents are in the big European countries. Global Parents’ Survey 2018 17 #VFParentsSurvey
  18. 18. VF Parents Survey 201818 Do you think the standard of education in your country has become better or worse over the last 10 years? by age 18c 41% 36% 31% 34% 41% 48% Parent aged 45+ Parent aged 35-44 Parent aged 18-34 % rating standard of education as 'worse' % rating standard of education as 'better' Highest % worse Highest % better France (65%) China (76%) South Africa (76%) Kenya (77%) South Africa (86%) India (72%); Singapore (72%) Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. standard of r country has r worse over ? increases with of those aged 18- on has got better 4% of those aged Parents’ pessimism increases with age.Close to half (48%) of those aged 18- 34 believe education has got better compared to just 34% of those aged 45+. Global Parents’ Survey 201818 #VFParentsSurvey
  19. 19. Global Parents’ Survey 2018 19 % rating free to attend schools nationally as ‘good’ vs. % schools have got ‘better’ schools in your country? 19al - Public GLOBAL AVERAGE United Kingdom Germany United States France Italy Japan Poland Brazil Russia Turkey China Mexico Australia Canada Colombia Peru Argentina Kenya Uganda Estonia South Africa South Korea Singapore Malaysia Finland India IndonesiaVietnam 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% %whothinkstandardofeducationhasgotbetter % rating free to attend schools as good/very good Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. Currently bad but has got better Currently good and has got better Currently good but has not got betterCurrently bad and not got better Spain o attend schools good’ vs. % got ‘better’ irection of travel in ucation varies greatly d economies are rents to be either orming below th no improvement The perceived direction of travel in standards of education varies greatly by country. Most established economies are perceived by parents to be either stagnant or performing below expectations with no improvement over time. #VFParentsSurvey
  20. 20. Global Parents’ Survey 201820 Which of the following statements best describes your experience of choosing your child’s current school? 20c Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. 76% 72% 69% 68% 68% 67% 66% 66% 62% 62% 61% 60% 59% 59% 57% 57% 57% 55% 55% 54% 52% 52% 50% 49% 49% 48% 48% 43% 42% 29% 12% 11% 19% 24% 16% 10% 12% 21% 20% 18% 13% 11% 25% 31% 17% 16% 17% 21% 20% 10% 11% 29% 6% 6% 24% 28% 7% 5% 21% 8% 10% 14% 8% 7% 14% 20% 20% 7% 15% 19% 23% 28% 15% 8% 25% 23% 23% 15% 11% 31% 33% 17% 42% 41% 27% 23% 42% 50% 35% 57% 1% 2% 3% 1% 3% 3% 2% 5% 2% 1% 3% 1% 1% 2% 1% 3% 3% 9% 14% 6% 3% 2% 3% 5% 1% 1% 4% 3% 3% 7% Mexico United Kingdom Peru India Spain Australia Italy Indonesia Malaysia South Africa Poland Russia Kenya Singapore China GLOBAL AVERAGE Brazil Argentina Colombia Estonia Germany Uganda Canada Finland Turkey Vietnam United States France South Korea Japan % who got first choice out of multiple options % who did not get first choice out of multiple options % who had only one option % don't knowowing describes your oosing your hool? a choice in r child to school. ave a choice, irst choice. s greatly by t to Mexico ers (76%) got their arents in Japan n to choose from. Not all parents had a choice in where to send their child to school. Of those who did have a choice, most did get their first choice. However this varies greatly by country. In contrast to Mexico where three quarters (76%) got their first choice, most parents in Japan only had one option to choose from. #VFParentsSurvey
  21. 21. Which of the following, if any, were the most important factors when choosing your child’s current school? 21al - Public 45% 45% 30% 30% 27% 25% 21% 19% 14% Quality of teachers Location or distance from home A happy environment for children at the school Academic record/exam results of the school School ethos (the values and culture of the school) Quality of facilities Approach to behaviour and discipline The cost of attending Extent to which they listen to/consider wishes of children % lowest % highest Japan (19%) Russia (69%) Uganda (24%) Spain (63%) Uganda (12%) South Korea (53%) Indonesia (14%) United Kingdom (44%) Vietnam (12%) China (50%) Estonia (7%) Vietnam (40%) Japan (8%) Malaysia (30%) Estonia (6%) Uganda (29%) South Africa (5%) Finland (53%) Base: All parents who had more than one school from which to choose (20072). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. Global results, % selected as either 1st,2nd or 3rd choice ollowing, if any, t important factors g your child’s l? ho did have a choice of st important factor for hoosing their child’s e location, is the ers. ties do vary by country. Finland, consideration children is the second factor behind location Among those who did have a choice of schools, the most important factor for parents when choosing their child’s school, alongside location, is the quality of teachers. However, priorities do vary by country. For example, in Finland, consideration of the wishes of children is the second most important factor behind location Global Parents’ Survey 2018 21 #VFParentsSurvey
  22. 22. VF Parents Survey 201822 Which of the following, if any, were the most important factors when choosing your child’s current school? 22c Base: All parents who had more than one school from which to choose (20072). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. 19% 24% 28% 29% 35% 36% 36% 37% 40% 41% 41% 43% 43% 44% 45% 45% 45% 46% 49% 50% 51% 51% 52% 54% 54% 54% 57% 58% 61% 69% 56% 24% 24% 61% 60% 30% 53% 46% 36% 36% 54% 50% 51% 33% 45% 44% 63% 46% 35% 43% 34% 52% 55% 31% 61% 58% 54% 32% 40% 58% 48% 19% 12% 29% 52% 19% 41% 16% 17% 19% 39% 30% 49% 32% 30% 40% 32% 28% 36% 20% 30% 38% 34% 25% 26% 36% 26% 30% 35% 36% 40% 41% 25% 16% 29% 14% 17% 26% 22% 32% 40% 35% 44% 36% 30% 31% 27% 28% 33% 22% 34% 31% 26% 34% 23% 35% 29% 24% 39% 29% 25% 15% 13% 21% 19% 18% 33% 21% 31% 31% 30% 22% 34% 30% 27% 36% 42% 30% 24% 23% 30% 35% 28% 50% 33% 19% 26% 12% 26% 25% 28% 16% 12% 23% 29% 31% 6% 24% 22% 22% 19% 27% 29% 27% 25% 31% 28% 27% 34% 28% 17% 23% 28% 18% 21% 21% 39% 40% 32% 16% Japan Kenya Uganda Finland South Korea Indonesia Estonia Mexico Peru Colombia Singapore Malaysia United Kingdom South Africa GLOBAL AVERAGE Australia Spain Argentina India Brazil Turkey Canada France China Germany Poland Italy Vietnam United States Russia Quality of teachers Location or distance from home A happy environment for children at the school Academic record/ exam results of the school School ethos (the values and culture) Quality of facilities Top 6 categories most often chosen as 1st,2nd or 3rd choice globally NB: 30% of parents from Uganda and from Indonesia gave an answer of ‘don’t know’ owing, if any, mportant factors our child’s e the most he quality of parents are d about location. Korea are d about e child, and K are most he school’s Russian parents are the most concerned about the quality of teachers. Spanish parents are the most concerned about location. Parents from South Korea are the most concerned about environment for the child, and parents from the UK are most concerned about the school’s academic record. Global Parents’ Survey 201822 #VFParentsSurvey
  23. 23. Global Parents’ Survey 2018 23 Which of the following, if any, were the most important factors when choosing your child’s current school? by phase 23al - Public 12% 19% 19% 25% 34% 25% 24% 46% 44% 15% 18% 22% 24% 26% 29% 36% 43% 45% Extent to which they listen to/consider wishes of children The cost of attending Approach to behaviour and discipline Quality of facilities A happy environment for children at the school School ethos (the values and culture of the school) Academic record/exam results of the school Location or distance from home Quality of teachers Child at secondary school Child at primary school Base: Parents of children in primary schools (10251), parents of children in secondary schools (9821). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. Global results, % selected as either 1st,2nd or 3rd choice ollowing, if any, t important factors g your child’s l? emic record is more n choosing a ol, as is school ethos. ol has a happy more important between primary A school’s academic record is more important when choosing a secondary school, as is school ethos. Whether a school has a happy environment is more important when choosing between primary schools. #VFParentsSurvey
  24. 24. Global Parents’ Survey 201824 If there were additional funds for your child’s school, which of the following would you like to see it spent on? 24c 34% 37% 37% 44% 46% 50% Buildings and other facilities such as playing fields and common areas Support staff (e.g. counsellors, teaching assistants) Resources (e.g. textbooks) Extra-curricular activities, e.g. sport/drama/arts clubs Computers/technology Teachers % lowest % highest Indonesia (22%) Germany (76%) Estonia (33%) Malaysia (58%) Uganda (27%) South Korea (71%) Estonia (25%) Kenya (50%) Kenya (23%) Spain (57%) Kenya (13%) South Korea (55%) Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. Global results, % selected as either 1st,2nd or 3rd choice NB: code ‘teachers’ includes those selecting either more teachers and/or better pay for existing teachers. ditional funds for ol, which of the you like to see it onal funds for most parents pent on teachers. wed by investment nology and extra- . facilities are ant to some South Korea, Italy If there were additional funds for their child’s school, most parents would want them spent on teachers. This is closely followed by investment in computers/technology and extracurricular activities. Buildings and other facilities are particularly important to some parents, such as in South Korea, Italy and Vietnam. Global Parents’ Survey 201824 #VFParentsSurvey
  25. 25. 25al - Public Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. 22% 37% 38% 39% 39% 41% 42% 43% 44% 44% 45% 46% 47% 47% 48% 49% 50% 51% 51% 52% 53% 55% 56% 60% 63% 63% 65% 67% 70% 76% 49% 49% 46% 48% 47% 41% 58% 56% 38% 50% 36% 48% 37% 57% 55% 55% 46% 33% 48% 45% 51% 57% 37% 38% 37% 43% 45% 48% 35% 49% 33% 51% 71% 50% 58% 57% 43% 52% 51% 52% 29% 32% 49% 49% 37% 53% 44% 48% 46% 43% 55% 35% 30% 41% 27% 37% 44% 40% 35% 32% 43% 29% 37% 34% 40% 31% 43% 43% 27% 29% 33% 50% 47% 38% 46% 36% 37% 25% 34% 39% 41% 43% 45% 27% 31% 36% 33% 40% 44% 32% 24% 37% 31% 34% 35% 34% 33% 30% 39% 43% 41% 23% 32% 43% 57% 32% 37% 37% 38% 50% 29% 38% 40% 45% 23% 50% 41% 33% 45% 32% 25% 38% 55% 27% 35% 49% 45% 49% 43% 38% 36% 13% 38% 38% 36% 40% 34% 30% 39% 27% 33% 22% 34% 23% 15% 31% 34% 26% 28% 39% Indonesia Mexico South Korea Peru Poland Vietnam Malaysia Italy Colombia Turkey Japan Kenya China Singapore Spain India GLOBAL AVERAGE Estonia Argentina Canada Russia South Africa Finland Brazil Uganda Australia France United States United Kingdom Germany More / better pay for teachers Computers/ technology Extra-curricular activities, e.g. sport/drama/ arts clubs Resources (e.g. textbooks) Support staff (e.g. counsellors, teaching assistants) Buildings and other facilities such as playing fields and common areas Top 6 categories most often chosen as 1st,2nd or 3rd choice globally NB: 30% of parents from Indonesia gave an answer of ‘don’t know’ additional funds for hool, which of the ld you like to see it rs are the biggest y. Parents place the more teachers or eir top priority in 13 India, Spain, ey, Italy, Malaysia, outh Korea, Mexico parents would prefer nal funds in nology. Globally, teachers are the biggest spending priority. Parents place the need for either more teachers or better pay as their top priority in 13 of 29 countries. In South Africa, India, Spain, Singapore, Turkey, Italy, Malaysia, Poland, Peru, South Korea, Mexico and Indonesia, parents would prefer to invest additional funds in computers/technology. Global Parents’ Survey 2018 25 #VFParentsSurvey
  26. 26. Global Parents’ Survey 201826 % choosing schools by quality of teaching vs % choosing to spend on teachers 26c Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. GLOBAL AVERAGE United Kingdom Germany United States France Italy Japan Poland Brazil Russia Turkey China Mexico Australia Canada Colombia Peru Argentina Kenya Uganda Estonia South Africa South Korea Singapore Malaysia Finland India Indonesia Vietnam Spain 15% 25% 35% 45% 55% 65% 75% 15% 25% 35% 45% 55% 65% 75% %wouldspendadditionalfundsonteachers* % chose quality of teachers in top 3 factors when choosing school *% selecting as 1st/2nd/3rd choice Teachers a spending priority but not a priority in choice of school Teachers a priority in choice of school and spending Teachers not a priority in choice of school or for spending Teachers a priority in choice of school, but not a spending priority ols by quality of oosing to spend h parents choose rs varies greatly and, parents on teachers even important reason s. e in Vietnam, Italy The extent to which parents choose to prioritise teachers varies greatly by country. In Uganda and Finland, parents prioritise spending on teachers even if it is not the most important reason for selecting schools. The opposite is true in Vietnam, Italy and Poland. #VFParentsSurvey
  27. 27. 02. TIME HELPING WITH EDUCATION
  28. 28. VF Parents Survey 201828 On average, how much time, if any, do you personally spend helping your child academically with their education per week (e.g. help reading to them or helping with homework)? 28c PISA 2015* N/A 525 416 N/A 425 518 416 403 397 487 475 556 N/A N/A N/A 481 401 496 501 N/A 493 516 509 510 528 509 495 534 538 531 Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. 5% 10% 10% 11% 11% 11% 13% 14% 17% 17% 21% 21% 22% 23% 25% 25% 27% 27% 29% 29% 30% 31% 33% 34% 35% 36% 37% 39% 50% 62% 14% 7% 15% 15% 14% 16% 18% 17% 12% 25% 21% 21% 20% 24% 18% 20% 30% 30% 19% 26% 20% 26% 23% 29% 20% 24% 20% 26% 20% 19% 20% 11% 21% 28% 29% 22% 23% 20% 23% 20% 13% 17% 19% 20% 17% 18% 18% 18% 16% 17% 16% 16% 15% 15% 16% 17% 21% 15% 14% 9% 20% 20% 13% 18% 19% 17% 16% 10% 16% 12% 10% 10% 14% 10% 8% 10% 9% 6% 8% 7% 7% 6% 7% 6% 10% 7% 7% 3% 5% 4% 11% 8% 10% 5% 4% 7% 4% 4% 5% 4% 3% 3% 5% 2% 2% 4% 2% 3% 2% 2% 2% 1% 2% 2% 3% 2% 1% 2% 1% 1% 31% 45% 31% 24% 23% 28% 27% 36% 29% 22% 32% 28% 19% 22% 29% 23% 14% 16% 27% 20% 25% 20% 21% 14% 16% 15% 14% 16% 10% 5% Finland Japan Estonia France United Kingdom Canada Australia Germany South Korea Spain Uganda Poland United States Brazil Italy GLOBAL AVERAGE South Africa Kenya Singapore Argentina Russia Peru Indonesia Mexico China Turkey Malaysia Colombia Vietnam India 7 hours or more between 4 and 7 hours between 2 and 4 hours between 1 and 2 hours less than 1 hour None rmance/share of top performers conomies with a share of low OECD average performance/share of top nificantly different from the OECD rmance/share of top performers conomies with a share of low OECD average much time, if onally spend d academically tion per week g to them or mework)? s worldwide say re hours a week en with their Time spent helping academically with homework per week Global Parents Survey | March 2018 | Final - Public 5% 10% 10% 11% 11% 11% 13% 14% 17% 17% 2 2 2 Finland Japan Estonia France United Kingdom Canada Australia Germany South Korea Spain Uganda Poland United States Brazil Italy GLOBAL AVERAGE South Africa Kenya Singapore Argentina Russia Peru Indonesia Mexico China Turkey Malaysia Colombia Vietnam India 7 hours or more between 4 *Mean science score in PISA 2015 Countries/economies with a mean performance/share of top performers above the OECD average; countries/economies with a share of low achievers below the OECD average Countries/economies with a mean performance/share of top performers/share of low achievers not significantly different from the OECD average Countries/economies with a mean performance/share of top performers below the OECD average; countries/economies with a share of low achievers above the OECD average On average, how much time, if any, do you personally spend helping your child academically with their education per week (e.g. help reading to them or helping with homework)? A quarter of parents worldwide say they spend 7 or more hours a week helping their children with their education. A quarter of parents worldwide say they spend 7 or more hours a week helping their children with their education. *Mean science score in PISA 2015 Global Parents’ Survey 201828 #VFParentsSurvey
  29. 29. Global Parents’ Survey 2018 29 29al - Public Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. 2.6 3.1 3.6 3.9 4.0 4.1 4.4 4.8 5.0 5.4 6.2 6.2 6.7 6.8 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.7 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.6 8.7 8.7 10.2 12.0 Japan Finland United Kingdom France Estonia Canada Australia Spain Germany South Korea Poland United States GLOBAL AVERAGE South Africa Italy China Kenya Russia Argentina Mexico Brazil Peru Singapore Malaysia Uganda Indonesia Colombia Turkey Vietnam India Average numbers of hours spent helping ow much time, if ersonally spend hild academically cation per week ding to them or homework)? r income and omies are more likely cant amounts of time ildren outside the those in established Parents in lower income and emerging economies are more likely to spend significant amounts of time helping their children outside the classroom than those in established economies. Global Parents’ Survey 2018 29 #VFParentsSurvey
  30. 30. 30 Global Parents’ Survey 2018 How much time do you spend helping your child with their education per week? by parent level of education 30c 7.1 6.2 7.1 6.7 Higher/ University and above Secondary Primary Total Average number of hours spent Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. % give no help 23% 39% 27% 18% do you spend d with their eek? f education rents were more e time every children with ated to primary t all. Better educated parents were more likely to spend some time every week helping their children with their education. 39% of those educated to primary level give no help at all. #VFParentsSurvey
  31. 31. How much time do you spend helping your child with their education per week? by type of school 31al - Public 6.9 7.9 6.0 6.7 Child attends other type of school Child attends fee paying school Child attends free to attend school Total all parents Average number of hours spent Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. % give no help 23% 24% 20% 44% me do you spend hild with their week? e s of children at free ls spend less time ucation than those fee paying schools. Globally, parents of children at free to attend schools spend less time helping with education than those with children at fee paying schools. Global Parents’ Survey 2018 31 #VFParentsSurvey
  32. 32. VF Parents Survey 201832 How much time do you spend helping your child with their education per week? by age of child 32c 6.2 6.6 7.0 6.9 6.7 16-18 12-15 8-11 4-7 Total Average number of hours spent Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. % give no help 23% 15% 14% 25% 41% do you spend d with their eek? the amount of children with s by age. d 16-18 receive f help per week – p at all. After the age of 11, the amount of time spent helping children with their education falls by age. Globally, those aged 16-18 receive the least amount of help per week – 41% receive no help at all. Global Parents’ Survey 201832 #VFParentsSurvey
  33. 33. 33 Global Parents’ Survey 2018 33al - Public 19% 20% 20% 21% 21% 22% 22% 23% 23% 24% 24% 25% 25% 27% 27% 27% 28% 30% 31% 32% 37% 38% 39% 39% 42% 43% 45% 46% 48% 48% 63% 60% 65% 66% 61% 63% 64% 67% 61% 57% 55% 63% 67% 67% 53% 60% 37% 54% 55% 50% 52% 43% 53% 53% 44% 47% 38% 41% 34% 46% 8% 13% 9% 6% 13% 8% 7% 6% 13% 18% 11% 6% 3% 5% 10% 5% 2% 8% 8% 15% 8% 9% 5% 8% 6% 6% 4% 9% 6% 2% 10% 7% 6% 7% 5% 8% 7% 5% 3% 1% 10% 7% 5% 1% 10% 8% 33% 9% 7% 3% 3% 11% 3% 0% 8% 5% 13% 4% 12% 5% Germany Spain Russia Italy United States France Canada Argentina Turkey India Finland United Kingdom Mexico Vietnam Poland Estonia Japan Australia GLOBAL AVERAGE China South Africa Indonesia Colombia Kenya Singapore Malaysia South Korea Brazil Uganda Peru Too little time The right amount of time Too much time Don't know Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. ou spend too e, or about the of time helping demically with n? f parents (31%) feel too little time ildren out of school. Uganda, Brazil and the most likely to too little time helping Nearly a third of parents (31%) feel that they spend too little time helping their children out of school. Parents in Peru, Uganda, Brazil and South Korea are the most likely to say they spend too little time helping with education. Do you feel you spend too much, too little, or about the right amount of time helping your child academically with their education? #VFParentsSurvey
  34. 34. 34 Global Parents’ Survey 2018 Average number of hours spent vs % think they spend too little time Despite already spending more time helping, parents in lower income economies feel this more acutely. Parents in more established economies spend less time helping, but are also less likely to think that this amount is too little. #VFParentsSurvey
  35. 35. Which of the following, if any, are the main barriers to you helping your child academically with their education? 35al - Public 21% 6% 4% 19% 27% 29% 30% 32% 52% None of these, there are no obstacles Don't know Other I don't feel that this is my job/that it is appropriate to help my child with their studies My child is unwilling to accept my help Don't feel well educated enough in the subject to offer my child help They already receive enough support from another family member/friend Lack of information from the school about how I can help Shortage of time/too busy % lowest % highest Estonia and Finland (38%) Kenya (73%) Finland (20%) South Korea (53%) China (21%) India (47%) Kenya (10%) China (51%) Uganda (5%) Finland (44%) Uganda (7%) South Korea (35%) Indonesia, Vietnam, China (1%) Canada (9%) Spain, Kenya, Singapore (2%) Indonesia (17%) South Korea (6%) United States (33%) Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. Global results, % selected as either 1st,2nd or 3rd choice ollowing, if any, barriers to you hild academically cation only occurring ents don’t help their by over half of cross the survey – is s believe there are The most commonly occurring reason that parents don’t help their children – cited by over half of parents (52%) across the survey – is lack of time. A fifth of parents believe there are no barriers. Global Parents’ Survey 2018 35 #VFParentsSurvey
  36. 36. VF Parents Survey 201836 Which of the following, if any, are the main barriers to you helping your child academically with their education? by perceived need 36c 9% 17% 29% 33% 32% 36% 68% 28% 18% 26% 26% 29% 29% 45% 14% 34% 29% 32% 28% 40% 52% None of these, there are no obstacles I don’t feel that this is my job/ that it is appropriate to help my child with their studies My child is unwilling to accept my help Don't feel well educated enough in the subject to offer my child help They already receive enough support from another family member/friend Lack of information from the school about how I can help Shortage of time/ too busy % those who think they spend too much time % those who think they spend about right amount of time % those who think they spend too little time Base: All parents (27380) and those who think they spend too little time helping: (8081). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. owing, if any, riers to you d academically tion? d ater barrier eel they spend ng. of those who much time eel that it isn’t Time is an even greater barrier among those who feel they spend too little time helping. Conversely, a third of those who feel they spend too much time helping their child feel that it isn’t their job to help. Global Parents’ Survey 201836 #VFParentsSurvey
  37. 37. 37 Global Parents’ Survey 2018 37al - Public 56% 34% 32% 28% 26% 22% 20% 48% 29% 27% 26% 32% 17% 22% 31% 20% 25% 19% 34% 13% 22% Shortage of time/too busy Lack of information from the school about how I can help They already receive enough support from another family member/friend My child is unwilling to accept my help Don't feel well educated enough in the subject to offer my child help I don't feel that this is my job/that it is appropriate to help my child with their studies None of these, there are no obstacles Higher/University and above Secondary Primary Base: Parents educated to higher/university and above (13566), parents educated to secondary school (13324), parents educated to primary school (481). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. ollowing, if any, barriers to you hild academically cation? el of education e is the greatest parents educated to and above. ents educated up to evel said lack of e subject was their Shortage of time is the greatest barrier among parents educated to university level and above. In contrast, parents educated up to primary school level said lack of knowledge in the subject was their main barrier. Which of the following, if any, are the main barriers to you helping your child academically with their education? by parent level of education #VFParentsSurvey
  38. 38. VF Parents Survey 201838 Parents Survey 201838 03. PLURALISM IN EDUCATION PROVISION
  39. 39. If it was affordable for you, and if there was an appropriate local place available, how likely would you be to send your child to a fee paying school? 39ublic 67% 64% 53% 56% 54% 39% 48% 49% 50% 45% 47% 44% 45% 45% 42% 40% 35% 30% 31% 31% 19% 23% 18% 16% 18% 11% 17% 17% 13% 26% 29% 39% 41% 42% 43% 43% 44% 46% 48% 48% 49% 49% 52% 54% 55% 63% 63% 67% 69% 73% 76% 80% 81% 81% 82% 82% 84% 85% Estonia Finland Australia Spain Italy Japan Poland France Argentina Germany South Korea Canada United Kingdom Russia Singapore GLOBAL AVERAGE Mexico United States Peru Vietnam Indonesia Colombia China Brazil Malaysia South Africa Turkey Kenya India % Unlikely % Likely PISA 2015* N/A N/A 425 N/A N/A 401 518 416 403 525 397 496 416 N/A 556 487 509 528 516 509 475 495 501 538 481 493 510 531 534 Base: Parents of children who attend free to attend government funded schools (16767). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. rformance/share of top performers s/economies with a share of low he OECD average ean performance/share of top significantly different from the OECD age rformance/share of top performers s/economies with a share of low he OECD average ble for you, and if propriate local how likely would your child to a fee obally whose child hool would be fairly y to send their child hool if it was ailable. NB: For this filtered question, Uganda had a low base size of below 75 55% of parents globally whose child attends a state school would be fairly likely or very likely to send their child to a fee-paying school if it was affordable and available. Global Parents’ Survey 2018 39 Countries/economies with a mean performance/share of top performers above the OECD average; countries/economies with a share of low achievers below the OECD average Countries/economies with a mean performance/share of top performers/share of low achievers not significantly different from the OECD average Countries/economies with a mean performance/share of top performers below the OECD average; countries/economies with a share of low achievers above the OECD average *Mean science score in PISA 2015 #VFParentsSurvey
  40. 40. VF Parents Survey 201840 How likely would you be to send your child to a fee paying school? by age, level of education and phase of school 40ublic Variable Split Likely Unlikely Parent Age 18-34 66% 30% 35-44 55% 39% 45+ 47% 47% Parent education level Primary 49% 41% Secondary 51% 43% University or above 60% 36% Phase of school currently attended by child Primary 56% 38% Secondary 53% 42% Base: All parents where the child attends a free to attend government funded school (16767); of whom, parents aged 18-34 (3349), 35-44 (7578), and 45+ (5840) and whose child is at a free-to-attend school; parents educated to primary level (376), secondary level (8973) and university or above (7414) and whose child is at a free-to-attend school; parents whose child is at primary school (8777) or secondary school (7990). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. ld you be to to a fee paying education and and those ersity level or kely to consider a . ld at primary ore likely to ying school; ear whether this of school or age Younger parents, and those educated to university level or above are more likely to consider a fee-paying school. Parents with a child at primary school are also more likely to consider a fee paying school; however, it is unclear whether this is driven by phase of school or age of parent. Global Parents’ Survey 201840 #VFParentsSurvey
  41. 41. 41 Global Parents’ Survey 2018 41ublic PISA 2015 N/A N/A 516 397 416 416 401 487 481 N/A 416 403 425 501 525 N/A 518 496 516 510 556 493 475 495 538 528 531 509 509 53422% 24% 22% 25% 23% 14% 25% 25% 20% 15% 13% 15% 17% 14% 15% 13% 8% 11% 7% 11% 22% 11% 9% 8% 11% 11% 12% 10% 10% 12% 33% 39% 39% 41% 43% 43% 44% 50% 51% 55% 56% 56% 60% 60% 61% 62% 64% 68% 69% 69% 70% 70% 75% 75% 77% 78% 78% 79% 81% 84% Estonia Germany United Kingdom Finland Canada Japan France Argentina Spain Singapore Australia South Korea United States China GLOBAL AVERAGE Vietnam Poland Turkey Indonesia Malaysia Uganda Italy Russia Brazil Mexico Colombia Peru South Africa India Kenya % Disapprove % Approve Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. 5 performance/share of top performers ries/economies with a share of low the OECD average mean performance/share of top ot significantly different from the OECD erage performance/share of top performers ries/economies with a share of low the OECD average es, the government n education h they can use to n for their child at a hoice, regardless of hool is run by a c organisation. To you/would you pprove of this our country? Shortage of time is the greatest barrier among parents educated to university level and above. In contrast, parents educated up to primary school level said lack of knowledge in the subject was their main barrier. In some countries, the government gives parents an education “voucher”, which they can use to “buy” education for their child at a school of their choice, regardless of whether the school is run by a private or public organisation. To what extent do you/would you approve or disapprove of this happening in your country? Countries/economies with a mean performance/share of top performers above the OECD average; countries/economies with a share of low achievers below the OECD average Countries/economies with a mean performance/share of top performers/share of low achievers not significantly different from the OECD average Countries/economies with a mean performance/share of top performers below the OECD average; countries/economies with a share of low achievers above the OECD average *Mean science score in PISA 2015 #VFParentsSurvey
  42. 42. 42 Global Parents’ Survey 2018 To what extent do you/would you approve or disapprove of this [education vouchers] happening in your country? by age, level of education and phase of school 42c Base: Parents aged 18-34 (6328), 35-44 (12113) and 45+ (8938); parents educated to primary level (481), secondary level (13324) and university and above (13566); parents whose child is at a free school (16767), whose child is at a fee-paying school (10002); parents whose child is at primary school (14464), secondary school (12916). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. Variable Split Approve Disapprove Parent Age 18- 34 68% 12% 35-44 61% 15% 45+ 55% 18% Parent education level Primary 52% 15% Secondary 58% 15% University and above 64% 15% School type Free 56% 16% Fee-paying 70% 13% Other 43% 20% Phase of school currently attended by child Primary 62% 14% Secondary 60% 16% o you/would isapprove of ouchers] ur country? ducation and ion vouchers also evel of education. n at fee-paying re likely to pt. As are d those rsity level of le variation by Approval of education vouchers also varies by age and level of education. Those with children at fee-paying school are also more likely to approve the concept. As are younger parents and those education to university level of above. There is little variation by phase of school. #VFParentsSurvey
  43. 43. % ‘approve’ of use of education vouchers vs % rate quality of free to attend schools as ‘good The extent to which approval of vouchers aligns to perceived quality of school is mixed. Parents in South America are more concerned about quality of education and have high approval ratings for vouchers; the converse is true in Finland and Estonia. Parents in Germany, France and Japan are also concerned about the quality of education, but are less likely to approve of vouchers. Global Parents’ Survey 2018 43 #VFParentsSurvey
  44. 44. VF Parents Survey 201844 In principle, to what extent do you approve or disapprove of each of the following organisations running any free to attend, government funded, schools in your country? 44lic 32% 23% 12% 20% 18% 40% 46% 61% 50% 49% Religious institutions Private companies Groups of teachers Parent groups Chartities % Disapprove % Approve Highest % approve Lowest % approve Kenya (85%) Japan (26%) Kenya (78%) Japan (20%) India (82%) Japan (28%) India (73%) United Kingdom (23%) Kenya (88%) Japan (9%) Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. what extent do you pprove of each of ganisations to attend, ded, schools in most support for the attend government be run by groups of and Kenya are the rent forms of Globally, there is most support for the concept of free to attend government funded schools to be run by groups of teachers. Parents from India and Kenya are the most open to different forms of governance. Global Parents’ Survey 201844 #VFParentsSurvey
  45. 45. 45 Global Parents’ Survey 2018 45 Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. 42% 38% 36% 29% 28% 27% 24% 24% 24% 19% 18% 18% 16% 15% 15% 14% 12% 11% 11% 10% 9% 8% 8% 8% 8% 7% 7% 6% 6% 4% 16% 28% 26% 25% 29% 24% 16% 19% 16% 17% 20% 14% 15% 12% 14% 13% 13% 13% 16% 10% 12% 10% 14% 16% 9% 10% 11% 11% 10% 6% 10% 24% 16% 17% 19% 20% 16% 16% 15% 16% 18% 17% 17% 19% 15% 15% 22% 19% 23% 18% 20% 16% 18% 19% 17% 18% 15% 18% 15% 10% 10% 6% 13% 13% 15% 14% 15% 17% 14% 14% 16% 17% 17% 18% 16% 17% 24% 19% 23% 21% 25% 19% 20% 18% 25% 20% 17% 19% 22% 13% 7% 2% 5% 7% 5% 9% 13% 8% 12% 15% 14% 16% 15% 16% 16% 16% 16% 18% 15% 18% 21% 19% 22% 12% 21% 21% 22% 15% 19% 17% 15% 1% 4% 11% 4% 7% 15% 15% 20% 19% 14% 18% 19% 20% 24% 25% 12% 21% 13% 22% 14% 28% 18% 27% 20% 25% 28% 31% 29% 50% Indonesia Kenya India Malaysia Uganda South Africa United States Brazil Finland Singapore China Vietnam GLOBAL AVERAGE South Korea Australia Poland Peru Turkey Colombia Canada Mexico Italy Argentina Estonia Russia Spain United Kingdom Germany France Japan % approve to all 5 organisations % approve to 4 / 5 organisations % approve to 3 / 5 organisations % approve to 2 / 5 organisations % approve to 1 / 5 organisation Do not approve of any organisation at extent do you rove of each of anisations o attend, ed, schools in al across roups, groups of companies, and ns sia, Kenya and illing to consider school % approval across each of the five organisation groups combined Parents from Indonesia, Kenya and India are the most willing to consider alternative forms of school governance. In principle, to what extent do you approve or disapprove of each of the following organisations running any free to attend, government funded, schools in your country? Combined approval across charities, parent groups, groups of teachers, private companies, and religious institutions #VFParentsSurvey
  46. 46. 46 Global Parents’ Survey 2018 To what extent do you approve or disapprove of the following organisations running free to attend schools? Groups of teachers 46 28% 34% 47% 49% 52% 52% 53% 54% 55% 56% 58% 58% 59% 60% 61% 61% 62% 62% 63% 64% 65% 66% 67% 70% 71% 72% 73% 73% 74% 82% Japan Italy Peru Germany Russia South Korea France Poland Turkey Vietnam Estonia Spain Argentina Canada GLOBAL AVERAGE United Kingdom Colombia Mexico Australia Finland Uganda Brazil Singapore Indonesia China United States Kenya South Africa Malaysia India % approve run by groups of teachers Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. approve or owing free to pport for teachers. 25 countries ose from Italy pproving. Globally, there is most support for schools run by groups of teachers. Over half of parents from 25 countries support this concept. Those from Italy and Japan are the least approving. #VFParentsSurvey
  47. 47. To what extent do you approve or disapprove of the following organisations running free to attend schools? Parent groups 47ic 20% 31% 34% 35% 36% 41% 42% 43% 43% 44% 45% 46% 46% 47% 49% 50% 50% 52% 53% 53% 56% 57% 59% 60% 61% 63% 64% 66% 76% 78% Japan Germany Italy United Kingdom Peru Poland Argentina Colombia Turkey Spain Mexico Australia Canada France Singapore Vietnam GLOBAL AVERAGE South Korea China Estonia Finland Russia United States Uganda Brazil Indonesia South Africa Malaysia India Kenya % approve run by parent groups Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. o you approve the following nning free to g markets are the ove of schools ps. rted most by a and India, and Parents in emerging markets are the most likely to approve of schools run by parent groups. Again, this is supported most by parents from Kenya and India, and least from Global Parents’ Survey 2018 47 #VFParentsSurvey
  48. 48. VF Parents Survey 201848 To what extent do you approve or disapprove of the following organisations running free to attend schools? Private companies 49lic 23% 28% 30% 31% 33% 35% 35% 36% 36% 41% 41% 41% 43% 45% 45% 46% 46% 48% 48% 48% 54% 55% 55% 60% 63% 64% 65% 67% 72% 73% United Kingdom Russia Canada Spain Italy Germany Japan Argentina Australia Estonia Poland Turkey Singapore China South Korea Vietnam GLOBAL AVERAGE France United States Finland Colombia Brazil Mexico Peru Malaysia Indonesia Uganda South Africa Kenya India % approve run by private companies Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. o you approve the following nning free to es s being run by is mixed. hed European likely to ncept. Support for schools being run by private companies is mixed. Parents in established European economies are less likely to approve of this concept. Global Parents’ Survey 201848 #VFParentsSurvey
  49. 49. 49 Global Parents’ Survey 2018 50 9% 14% 19% 19% 23% 24% 24% 26% 27% 29% 30% 31% 31% 33% 34% 35% 36% 40% 40% 45% 48% 51% 51% 53% 55% 57% 64% 68% 82% 88% Japan Estonia Germany Russia United Kingdom France Spain Mexico Turkey Finland Italy Poland China Canada Argentina South Korea Vietnam Australia GLOBAL AVERAGE Singapore Colombia Brazil Peru United States India Malaysia South Africa Indonesia Uganda Kenya % approve run by religious institutions Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. you approve or following ning free to ons on in the extent to ort religious free to attend rt from parents in and least support a and Japan. There is wide variation in the extent to which parents support religious institutions running free to attend schools. This has most support from parents in Kenya and Uganda, and least support from those in Estonia and Japan. To what extent do you approve or disapprove of the following organisations running free to attend schools? Religious institutions #VFParentsSurvey
  50. 50. 50 Global Parents’ Survey 2018 To what extent do you approve of the following organisations running free to attend schools? by parent age 51 34% 41% 43% 42% 57% 39% 47% 50% 49% 61% 49% 52% 59% 60% 67% Religious groups Private companies Parent groups Charities Groups of teachers % parents aged 18-34 approve % parents aged 35-44 approve % parents aged 45+ approve Base: Parents aged 18-34 (6328), parents aged 35-44 (12113), parents aged 45+ (8939). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. approve isations schools? ups running s with age. pes of t support 4. Support for different groups running free to attend schools falls with age. Consistently across all types of governance, there is most support among parents aged 18-34. #VFParentsSurvey
  51. 51. To what extent do you approve of the following organisations running free to attend schools? by parent level of education 52 35% 38% 47% 50% 54% 36% 41% 48% 46% 57% 44% 51% 52% 53% 65% Religious groups Private companies Parent groups Charities Groups of teachers % parents educated to Higher/University+ approve % parents educated to secondary level approve % parents educated to primary-level approve Base: Parents educated to primary level (481), parents educated to secondary level (13324), parents educated to higher/university level and above (13566). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. u approve isations d schools? cation pes of st support to rimary y up. Consistently across all types of governance, there is most support among parents educated to university level or above. Parents who only have primary education are particularly supportive of charity group. Global Parents’ Survey 2018 51 #VFParentsSurvey
  52. 52. VF Parents Survey 201852 To what extent do you approve of the following organisations running free to attend schools? by school type Parents with children at a fee-paying school are more open to the idea of other organisations running free to attend schools. This is most apparent in support for private companies and religious groups. Global Parents’ Survey 201852 53lic 34% 40% 43% 44% 52% 32% 40% 45% 48% 59% 52% 56% 56% 54% 64% Religious groups Private companies Charities Parent groups Groups of teachers % approve among parents with child at fee-paying school % approve among parents with child at free to attend school % approve among parents with child at 'other' school Base: Parents of children attending fee-paying schools (10002), parents of children attending free to attend schools (16767), parents of children who attend other schools (611). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. o you approve organisations ttend schools? en at a fee-paying pen to the idea of s running free to ent in support for and religious Base: Parents of children attending fee-paying schools (10002), parents of children attending free to attend schools (16767), parents of children who attend other schools (611). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, con- ducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. #VFParentsSurvey
  53. 53. 04. OPTIMISM FOR THE FUTURE
  54. 54. 54 Global Parents’ Survey 2018 How well, if at all, do you think your child’s school is preparing them for the future world of 2030 and beyond? 55 52% 47% 44% 25% 41% 43% 36% 38% 31% 37% 34% 30% 31% 32% 31% 27% 24% 30% 21% 23% 29% 27% 24% 28% 28% 23% 18% 15% 7% 11% 37% 46% 47% 48% 51% 52% 57% 59% 61% 62% 64% 64% 65% 65% 65% 67% 67% 67% 67% 68% 69% 69% 69% 70% 71% 72% 76% 78% 86% 88% South Korea Russia France Japan Poland Italy Germany Turkey Canada Uganda Peru GLOBAL AVERAGE Argentina Brazil Mexico Spain Estonia Colombia United Kingdom Australia South Africa Malaysia Singapore Vietnam Kenya China United States Finland Indonesia India % not well % well PISA 2015* N/A N/A 531 496 518 N/A 525 556 N/A N/A 510 509 416 534 493 416 401 475 N/A 397 N/A 528 425 509 481 N/A 538 495 487 516 Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. you think reparing orld of of parents ol is he world of hest (India, nam), and n and nfidence. Almost two-thirds (64%) of parents believe their child’s school is preparing them well for the world of 2030 and beyond. Asia has some of the highest (India, Indonesia, China and Vietnam), and some of the lowest (Japan and South Korea) levels of confidence. #VFParentsSurvey
  55. 55. Which of the following, if any, are the most important areas where you think your child’s school should be doing more to better prepare your child for the world of 2030 and beyond? 56 Base: Parents who feel their child is underprepared for the world of 2030 and beyond (9758). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. 31% 40% 42% 43% 43% 46% 47% 47% 48% 48% 49% 50% 51% 52% 52% 52% 53% 53% 58% 58% 58% 59% 60% 60% 61% 62% 62% 64% 66% 69% 22% 56% 50% 45% 50% 36% 49% 44% 54% 50% 50% 52% 40% 54% 57% 36% 42% 51% 57% 49% 48% 57% 48% 57% 54% 50% 57% 60% 55% 67% 26% 53% 47% 45% 46% 44% 46% 51% 28% 37% 51% 50% 52% 59% 56% 40% 65% 51% 64% 51% 56% 53% 59% 59% 52% 53% 52% 64% 65% 44% 32% 50% 34% 43% 39% 34% 39% 57% 44% 62% 44% 55% 29% 44% 44% 43% 46% 45% 40% 53% 62% 50% 23% 61% 50% 48% 48% 41% 28% 54% 19% 57% 49% 53% 50% 48% 42% 41% 32% 50% 55% 49% 29% 62% 45% 37% 72% 43% 31% 46% 46% 54% 22% 36% 31% 31% 28% 28% 47% 44% Indonesia Poland Mexico Colombia Peru Finland Brazil China Japan Vietnam Turkey Malaysia Uganda Spain Argentina Estonia Italy GLOBAL AVERAGE Russia India Singapore France Kenya Germany United Kingdom United States Canada Australia South Africa South Korea Greater focus on the new type of careers, jobs and skills needed for the future A more relevant and up to date curriculum that keeps pace with change Greater focus on preparing them to use new and emerging technology Greater focus on non-traditional or 'softer' skills Greater international outlook % selecting as 1st/2nd/3rd choice NB: 54% of parents from Indonesia who felt unprepared selected ‘don’t know’ g, if any, are reas where school to better the world heir child is t common us on new d skills. y a preference riculum and w technology. Among those who feel their child is underprepared, the most common request is for greater focus on new types of careers, jobs and skills. This is closely followed by a preference for a more up to data curriculum and preparation for using new technology. Global Parents’ Survey 2018 55 #VFParentsSurvey
  56. 56. VF Parents Survey 201856 Taking everything into consideration, how optimistic or pessimistic are you about your child’s future? 57lic Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. 14% 23% 12% 12% 19% 15% 17% 22% 12% 21% 13% 22% 13% 13% 11% 13% 16% 7% 10% 8% 8% 17% 9% 11% 4% 4% 6% 8% 14% 3% 28% 31% 35% 38% 39% 41% 47% 49% 52% 55% 57% 57% 59% 60% 62% 64% 64% 66% 66% 68% 68% 70% 70% 71% 73% 76% 77% 79% 81% 83% Japan France South Korea Germany Italy Spain Singapore Turkey Poland Malaysia United Kingdom South Africa Australia GLOBAL AVERAGE Canada Russia Uganda China Estonia Vietnam United States India Argentina Brazil Finland Mexico Colombia Indonesia Kenya Peru % pessimistic % optimistic g into ow optimistic e you about re? (60%) of parents ut their child’s e highest levels of ower income and es. h as Japan, a and Germany) omier. Almost two-thirds (60%) of parents are optimistic about their child’s future. Some of the highest levels of optimism were in lower income and emerging economies. Richer nations (such as Japan, France, South Korea and Germany) were generally gloomier. Global Parents’ Survey 201856 #VFParentsSurvey
  57. 57. 57 Global Parents’ Survey 2018 There is some relationship between optimism and sense of preparation for the future. However, parents in Russia feel less prepared but remain optimistic. In contrast, parents in Singapore and Spain are more likely to feel their children are well prepared for the world of 2030 but are less optimistic about their child’s future. % optimistic for the future vs % well prepared for 2030 #VFParentsSurvey
  58. 58. 58 Global Parents’ Survey 2018 What, if any of the following, causes you the most anxiety about your child at school? 59 19% 23% 23% 24% 30% 34% 41% 43% Ability to make friends Growing up 'too early' through peer pressure Their physical health Not being stretched enough academically Facing too much academic pressure Their personal safety Their mental wellbeing, including bullying Whether they are happy and enjoy school % lowest % highest Uganda (20%) Spain (64%) Uganda (19%) Spain (57%) Indonesia (19%) Brazil (48%) Argentina (17%) Singapore (56%) China (10%) Russia (44%) United Kingdom (12%) India (37%) Japan (11%) United States (35%) Peru (8%) South Korea (31%) Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. Global results, % selected as either 1st,2nd or 3rd choice owing, nxiety hool? aramount ldwide he top hem the child at y concerns bullying. Children’s happiness is paramount to parents, with 43% worldwide selecting this as among the top three factors that cause them the most anxiety about their child at school. This is closely followed by concerns of mental wellbeing and bullying. #VFParentsSurvey
  59. 59. What, if any of the following, causes you the most anxiety about your child at school? by phase, parent age and school type 60 Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. Top 3 anxieties Phase Parent age School type Primary Secondary 18-34 35-44 45+ Free Fee paying Other Whether they are happy and enjoy school 43% 43% 38% 43% 48% 45% 42% 33% Their mental wellbeing, including bullying 44% 38% 40% 42% 40% 42% 39% 37% Their personal safety 36% 32% 38% 34% 31% 33% 37% 28% Facing too much academic pressure 28% 33% 28% 31% 31% 29% 34% 23% Not being stretched enough academically 22% 26% 22% 24% 27% 26% 22% 18% Their physical health 22% 24% 23% 23% 22% 22% 24% 21% Growing up 'too early' through peer pressure 23% 22% 23% 23% 22% 23% 22% 18% Ability to make friends 20% 18% 19% 19% 19% 20% 18% 15% e following, ost anxiety at school? age and school oying school is older parents attend schools. chool children about mental onal safety. and being ally are larger econdary school Being happy and enjoying school is a larger concern for older parents and those at free to attend schools. Parents of primary school children are more concerned about mental wellbeing, and personal safety. Academic pressure and being stretched academically are larger concerned among secondary school parents. Global Parents’ Survey 2018 59 #VFParentsSurvey
  60. 60. VF Parents Survey 201860 What, if any of the following, causes you the most anxiety about your child’s future? 61lic 11% 12% 14% 16% 16% 18% 26% 30% 30% 34% 42% Housing Ability to keep pace with technology Environment and climate change Relationships Terrorism and conflict Discrimination and inequality Health/disease Crime and staying safe Peer pressure and attitudes towards drinking, drugs and sex Money and the cost of living Getting a job and having a successful career % lowest % highest Indonesia (24%) France (59%) Indonesia (22%) Singapore (54%) Japan (9%) South Africa (39%) Uganda (9%) Mexico (53%) South Africa (11%) Spain (46%) Japan (7%) South Korea (35%) Uganda (7%) Germany (34%) Uganda (7%); Indonesia (7%) Japan (34%) South Africa (5%) Germany (23%) United Kingdom (6%) South Korea (28%) Indonesia (3%) United Kingdom (22%) Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. Global results, % selected as either 1st,2nd or 3rd choice he following, most anxiety ’s future? parental concern n’s futures a job and having a lly more read and butter an terrorism and ough terrorism is any, France, and The most common parental concern about their children’s futures globally is getting a job and having a successful career. Parents are generally more concerned about bread and butter economic issues than terrorism and climate change; though terrorism is a concern in Germany, France, and Turkey. Global Parents’ Survey 201860 #VFParentsSurvey
  61. 61. 61 Global Parents’ Survey 2018 62 % 10/10 ‘extremely important’ 80% 79% 75% 56% 63% 62% 55% 55% 61% 52% 60% 38% 38% 31% 51% 36% 37% 40% 29% 32% 30% 23% 27% 14% 8% 16% 6% 13% 13% 11% Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. 13% 16% 15% 20% 8% 4% 12% 8% 5% 4% 4% 2% 5% 4% 3% 7% 1% 4% 1% 5% 3% 4% 2% 2% 3% 2% 2% 2% 1% 2% 32% 32% 35% 38% 39% 42% 43% 54% 54% 62% 64% 64% 65% 66% 66% 68% 71% 72% 75% 75% 77% 77% 80% 82% 84% 85% 87% 89% 92% 92% France United Kingdom Germany Finland Japan South Korea Australia Canada Spain Vietnam Estonia Singapore GLOBAL AVERAGE Italy Poland Uganda China United States Malaysia Kenya Russia South Africa Turkey Argentina Peru Indonesia India Brazil Mexico Colombia % not very important (1-3)* % very important (8-10)* *Scored on a scale of 1-10, where 10 is extremely important and 1 is not at all important. not do you r child on order to in life? ider it t their child sing to 65% important’ far more niversity than 40% of parents consider it extremely important their child attends university, rising to 65% stating it to be ‘very important’ overall. Latin Americans are far more determined about university than most. How important or not do you think it is that your child attends university on order to achieve the most in life? #VFParentsSurvey
  62. 62. 62 Global Parents’ Survey 2018 How important or not do you think it is that your child attends university on order to achieve the most in life? by education level of parent 63 61% 59% 72% 6% 8% 3% Primary Secondary Higher / University and above Very important (8-10) Not very important (1-3) Highest % not important Highest % important France (10%) Colombia (93%); Mexico (93%) Poland (1%); Turkey (1%) Finland (27%) N/A N/A Base: All parents (27380). Research commissioned by the Varkey Foundation, conducted by Ipsos MORI between 8th December 2017 - 15th January 2018. do you ld order to e? cation ersity level to say portant econdary Parents educated to university level or higher are more likely to say attending university is important than those educated to secondary or primary level. #VFParentsSurvey
  63. 63. VF Parents Survey 2018 63 2nd Floor, St Albans House 57 – 59 Haymarket London, SW1Y 4QX. UK +44 (0) 20 7593 4040 www.varkeyfoundation.org Global Parents’ Survey 2018

×