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Considerations with Benign and Cancerous Brain Tumors

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Dr. Franklin Epstein functions as the chief of the Neurosurgery Service at Audie L. Murphy Memorial VA Hospital. A highly experienced neurosurgeon, Dr. Franklin Epstein surgically treats a number of conditions, including brain tumors.

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Considerations with Benign and Cancerous Brain Tumors

  1. 1. By Franklin Epstein
  2. 2. Introduction  Dr. Franklin Epstein functions as the chief of the Neurosurgery Service at Audie L. Murphy Memorial VA Hospital. A highly experienced neurosurgeon, Dr. Franklin Epstein surgically treats a number of conditions, including brain tumors. The prognosis for recovery from a brain tumor depends on a variety of factors, such as whether the tumor is benign or malignant, as well as the part of the brain the tumor affects. For instance, benign, or non-cancerous, tumors may grow relatively slowly. They tend to have clearer boundaries and are often easier to operate on and remove. Cancerous growths in the brain, in comparison, enlarge and spread to other areas at a faster rate.
  3. 3. Benign and Cancerous Brain Tumors  Hence, their removal is often more complicated. A key factor in the treatment of a tumor is the part of the brain that is affected. In certain areas of the brain, even a non-cancerous tumor can be dangerous. For instance, it might cause nearby areas to become inflamed, a factor that can result in excess pressure against the skull. Therefore, a physician should evaluate all tumors, and a person should monitor the development of any new symptoms that might indicate a worsening problem.

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