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RHU, 120th AG BN
In This Lesson
 Knowing yourself

 Job Searching
 Job Applications/Resumés

 Interview Preparation
 Interviews and Fo...
References: (Write these down!)
 Slideshare (All slides/books located here):

www.slideshare.net/FortJacksonRHU
 O*NET (...
Before the Job Search:
Before beginning a job search, it’s important to know
which of the following?
A. What companies you...
The Job Searching Process
Find the field/industry which you are willing to work
Search for openings

1.
2.

a.
b.

Network...
Knowing Yourself
 What kind of work do I like to do?
 What am I best at?
 What kind of work environment do I prefer?
 ...
What Job is For You?
Think of:
 Your skills/qualifications
 What you can provide to
a company
 What criteria most of
yo...
The Job Searching Process
Find the field/industry which you are willing to work
Search for openings

1.
2.

a.
b.

Network...
Truths About the Job Market
 There are always jobs out there

 Whether you can find them depends

on your methods of job...
Job Finding Techniques
Best Ways

Worst Ways

 Ask for job leads (33% success)  Mail out resumés at random
 Knocking on...
The Creative Approach
 Do thorough homework and explore upon yourself. Know






in what kinds of fields you want to...
Getting Organized
• Treat Finding a Job as a Job.

• Create Sample Applications

• Create Several Résumés
• Create Several...
Networking
Why Network?
• Find the hidden jobs
• Get direct referrals
• Expand the number of
people you now in the
industr...
Job Postings
 Hundreds of job searching websites
 Newspapers
 Government Offices/Employment Agencies
 Internet Ads

 ...
The Job Searching Process
1.
2.

Find the field/industry which you are willing to work
Search for openings
a.
b.

3.

Netw...
Applications
 Most applications are ran through the Applicant

Tracking System (ATS) prior to being seen by a person
 Pr...
Cover Letters
 Cover Letters are a written introduction; short elevator

speech on why you want the job and why they shou...
•Don’t write your entire resume
•Note when you are available for
employment
•Use good quality paper
Types of Résumés
Resume Format Advantages
Widely Used Format
Logical Flow, easy to read
Chronological

Disadvantages
Empha...
Résumés
Parts of the Resume
 Header
 Summary of Qualifications/Skills
 Experience
 Education
Tips:
 Action verbs
 Ac...
“Education” goes
at the top only if
your degree
relates to the job

List as
many skills
as possible

Experience in
each jo...
Sample Combined
Example 1: Retail
Flying J – Retail Shift Supervisor
Chronological
Functional
Combined
Building Upon Your Résumé
 Volunteer Work
 Certification Classes
 Internships/Apprenticeships
 Internships.com
 Exper...
The Job Searching Process
Find the field/industry which you are willing to work
Search for openings

1.
2.

a.
b.

Network...
Before the Interview
 Get directions to the interview site
 Determine what time you need to leave to get there





...
Appropriate Attire
Women

Men

 Tailored Shirt/Blouse or

 Conservative collared shirt/polo








Knitted Sweate...
Inappropriate Attire
 Wrinkled or un-tucked clothing
 T-shirts with words
 Jeans, sweatpants, shorts, baggy pants, expo...
Interview Preparation
 RESEARCH THE COMPANY!
 Contact References
 Gather materials you may need (Résumé, transcripts/

...
Rehearsals
 Positive First Impressions
 Communicating your skills
 Answering problem questions
 Asking key questions

...
Interviewing: Selling yourself
 “Tell me about yourself”
 SEE
 SKILLS
 EXPERIENCE
 EDUCATION
 Interviewers will ask ...
Interviewing: Selling yourself











Relax!
Be Honest
Show Interest
Take Brief Notes
Listen
Ask Questions (...
The Job Searching Process
Find the field/industry which you are willing to work
Search for openings

1.
2.

a.
b.

Network...
Follow-Up
 Thank you notes:
 Send a follow-up or thank you note to everyone who
interviewed you. Notes may be hand writt...
Follow-Up
 Make inquiries
 If you haven’t heard from an organization after the set
time, try calling or sending e-mail t...
If You are Offered the Job
 Before you accept, think about the position in terms of:
 Job responsibility
 Working hours...
Keeping Your Job
 Be realistic
 Be patient

If the job isn’t right for you
– don’t lose hope!

 Show initiative
 Be co...
Conclusion
Do what it takes to get the job you want!
Evaluate: you personal needs, goals, skills and
achievements
Research...
References: (Write these down!)
 Slideshare (All slides/books located here):

www.slideshare.net/FortJacksonRHU
 O*NET (...
Transition Assistance Program Slideshow
Transition Assistance Program Slideshow
Transition Assistance Program Slideshow
Transition Assistance Program Slideshow
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Transition Assistance Program Slideshow

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This is the slideshow given to Initial Entry Soldiers who are in the process of being separated from the Army in order to help them prepare themselves for the civilian workforce.

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Transition Assistance Program Slideshow

  1. 1. RHU, 120th AG BN
  2. 2. In This Lesson  Knowing yourself  Job Searching  Job Applications/Resumés  Interview Preparation  Interviews and Follow-up
  3. 3. References: (Write these down!)  Slideshare (All slides/books located here): www.slideshare.net/FortJacksonRHU  O*NET (Occupational Information Network) www.onetonline.org  Fort Jackson MWR Employment Readiness Program www.fortjacksonmwr.com/acs_emp/index.html (Click: “Job Search Links”)  Virtual Career Library www.virtualcareerlibrary.com/jackson
  4. 4. Before the Job Search: Before beginning a job search, it’s important to know which of the following? A. What companies you want to work for B. What kind of job you want and how you can help an employer C. Opportunities for growth that companies have to offer
  5. 5. The Job Searching Process Find the field/industry which you are willing to work Search for openings 1. 2. a. b. Networking Job Postings Adjust your profile for the job 3. 1. 2. 3. Application Cover Letters Résumé 4. Interview 5. Follow-up 1. Thank you letter
  6. 6. Knowing Yourself  What kind of work do I like to do?  What am I best at?  What kind of work environment do I prefer?  What are my financial goals?  Am I willing to relocate? Holland’s Hexagon of Personality Types
  7. 7. What Job is For You? Think of:  Your skills/qualifications  What you can provide to a company  What criteria most of your selected jobs require O*Net Interest Profiler: http://www.mynextmove.org/explore/ip
  8. 8. The Job Searching Process Find the field/industry which you are willing to work Search for openings 1. 2. a. b. Networking Job Postings Adjust your profile for the job 3. 1. 2. 3. Application Cover Letters Résumé 4. Interview 5. Follow-up 1. Thank you letter
  9. 9. Truths About the Job Market  There are always jobs out there  Whether you can find them depends on your methods of job-hunting
  10. 10. Job Finding Techniques Best Ways Worst Ways  Ask for job leads (33% success)  Mail out resumés at random  Knocking on door of prospective employer (47%)  Creative Approach to JobHunting (86%)     (7% success) Answering ads in professional or trade journals (7%) Answering non-local newspaper ads (10%) Answering local newspaper ads (5-24%) Going to private employment agencies (5-24%)
  11. 11. The Creative Approach  Do thorough homework and explore upon yourself. Know     in what kinds of fields you want to use those skills. Talk to people who are in those kinds of jobs. Choose organizations and do research on those organizations. Seek out the person who actually has the power to hire you for the job you want. Use your personal contacts to get to him or her. Show how you can help your prospective employer solve their problems.
  12. 12. Getting Organized • Treat Finding a Job as a Job. • Create Sample Applications • Create Several Résumés • Create Several Cover Letters • Set Goals • Weekly Job Search Schedule
  13. 13. Networking Why Network? • Find the hidden jobs • Get direct referrals • Expand the number of people you now in the industry you target  Build relationships  Listen and Ask Questions  Support and Maintain Connections “It’s all about who you know” -Dale Doback
  14. 14. Job Postings  Hundreds of job searching websites  Newspapers  Government Offices/Employment Agencies  Internet Ads  Bulletin boards  Schools
  15. 15. The Job Searching Process 1. 2. Find the field/industry which you are willing to work Search for openings a. b. 3. Networking Job Postings Adjust your profile for the job a. b. c. Application Cover Letters Résumé 4. Interview 5. Follow-up a. Thank you letter
  16. 16. Applications  Most applications are ran through the Applicant Tracking System (ATS) prior to being seen by a person  Print Legibly (Black or Blue Pen)  Be Honest  Follow Instructions  Tailor Answers to the Job  Only Give Salary Range if Requested  Provide Valid References  Double Check for Mistakes  Use a Master Application Form (Provided from the Virtual Career Library)
  17. 17. Cover Letters  Cover Letters are a written introduction; short elevator speech on why you want the job and why they should hire you  The purpose is for the employer to clarify how your skills match the requirements and to motivate the employer to read your résumé  Three to four brief paragraphs to address a specific purpose *Ensure you keep copies of all your applications, cover letters and résumés.
  18. 18. •Don’t write your entire resume •Note when you are available for employment •Use good quality paper
  19. 19. Types of Résumés Resume Format Advantages Widely Used Format Logical Flow, easy to read Chronological Disadvantages Emphasizes gaps in employment Not suitable if you have no work history Combination Highlights frequent job changes Easy to Prepare Functional Showcase growth in skills and responsibility Best Used By Individuals with steady work record Emphasizes employment but not skill development Emphasizes skills rather than employment Organizes a variety of experience (paid and unpaid work, other activities) Disguises gaps in work record or a series of short term jobs Highlights most relevant skills and accomplishments De-emphasizes employment history in less relevant jobs Combines skills developed in a variety of jobs or other activities Minimizes drawbacks such as employment gaps and absence of directly related experience Viewed with suspicion by employers due to lack of information about specific employers and dates Individuals with no previous or gaps in employment Individuals with gaps in employment Frequent job changers Confusing if not well organized De-emphasizes job tasks, responsibilities requires more effort and creativity to prepare Career changers or those in transition Individuals reentering the job market after some absence Individuals who have grown in skills and responsibility Individuals pursuing the same or similar work as they've had in the past
  20. 20. Résumés Parts of the Resume  Header  Summary of Qualifications/Skills  Experience  Education Tips:  Action verbs  Achievement Statements  Keywords  PROOFREAD Interchangeable depending on the type of résumé
  21. 21. “Education” goes at the top only if your degree relates to the job List as many skills as possible Experience in each job relates to the job you’re applying for
  22. 22. Sample Combined
  23. 23. Example 1: Retail Flying J – Retail Shift Supervisor
  24. 24. Chronological
  25. 25. Functional
  26. 26. Combined
  27. 27. Building Upon Your Résumé  Volunteer Work  Certification Classes  Internships/Apprenticeships  Internships.com  Experience.com  Goabroad.com  Typing Courses  Typingweb.com  Goodtyping.com  Sense-lang.org/typing
  28. 28. The Job Searching Process Find the field/industry which you are willing to work Search for openings 1. 2. a. b. Networking Job Postings Adjust your profile for the job 3. 1. 2. 3. Application Cover Letters Résumé 4. Interview 5. Follow-up 1. Thank you letter
  29. 29. Before the Interview  Get directions to the interview site  Determine what time you need to leave to get there     EARLY Build/gather your portfolio Appropriate attire Researching the company Rehearsing your “Elevator Speech” (Selling yourself)
  30. 30. Appropriate Attire Women Men  Tailored Shirt/Blouse or  Conservative collared shirt/polo       Knitted Sweater/sets Non-denim pants or kneelength skirt Pantyhose with skirts Closed toed shoes/heels Neatly Groomed Hair Manicured/polished nails Conservative make-up and jewelry  Solid tee/turtleneck  Sports Coats  Non-denim, tailored slacks  Belt matches the shoes  Mid-calf socks, matches the pants  Polished shoes  Groomed hair; shaven  Conservative watches
  31. 31. Inappropriate Attire  Wrinkled or un-tucked clothing  T-shirts with words  Jeans, sweatpants, shorts, baggy pants, exposed      undergarments Huge belt buckles Gym socks Worn out shoes, sandals, flip-flops or athletic shoes Perfume/cologne Visible body piercings/tattoos
  32. 32. Interview Preparation  RESEARCH THE COMPANY!  Contact References  Gather materials you may need (Résumé, transcripts/ certificates, references list, pen and paper)  Know your strengths  Know your weaknesses  AND how you’re working on improving them  PRACTICE!  Be on time and dress appropriately
  33. 33. Rehearsals  Positive First Impressions  Communicating your skills  Answering problem questions  Asking key questions  Helping Employers know why they should hire you  Closing the interview properly
  34. 34. Interviewing: Selling yourself  “Tell me about yourself”  SEE  SKILLS  EXPERIENCE  EDUCATION  Interviewers will ask trick questions  Do not open the door to:  Marital/Family Status, Sexual Orientation, Religion, Race, Political Views
  35. 35. Interviewing: Selling yourself           Relax! Be Honest Show Interest Take Brief Notes Listen Ask Questions (Do not ask how much the position pays) Make Your Points Politely Be Positive State Your Interest Ask When to Expect Contact (If no position is available, ask if you can check back periodically)
  36. 36. The Job Searching Process Find the field/industry which you are willing to work Search for openings 1. 2. a. b. Networking Job Postings Adjust your profile for the job 3. 1. 2. 3. Application Cover Letters Résumé 4. Interview 5. Follow-up 1. Thank you letter
  37. 37. Follow-Up  Thank you notes:  Send a follow-up or thank you note to everyone who interviewed you. Notes may be hand written. Formal Letters should be typed.  Ask additional questions, supply more information, underline an important point or just to remind the person who interviewed you that you’re still interested.  Keep it short. Send it quick.
  38. 38. Follow-Up  Make inquiries  If you haven’t heard from an organization after the set time, try calling or sending e-mail to ask if the position has been filled  If you don’t get the job, don’t be discouraged!
  39. 39. If You are Offered the Job  Before you accept, think about the position in terms of:  Job responsibility  Working hours (part-time and overtime)  Pace of Work  Salary Range  Benefits  Location  Transportation  Working conditions  Advancement Opportunities If you accept, send a letter of acceptance, even if you have confirmed verbally. Confirm the starting date and time. Keep a copy of the letter!
  40. 40. Keeping Your Job  Be realistic  Be patient If the job isn’t right for you – don’t lose hope!  Show initiative  Be cooperative  Be conscientious  Be professional  Keep learning! Start your search over again. Consider additional training. Move on and move up!
  41. 41. Conclusion Do what it takes to get the job you want! Evaluate: you personal needs, goals, skills and achievements Research: careers to determine the fields that are most suitable to you – keep an open mind Network: to find specific job openings talk with your contacts and potential employers Sell Yourself: to potential employers, through a thoughtfully composed résumé, cover letter & interview
  42. 42. References: (Write these down!)  Slideshare (All slides/books located here): www.slideshare.net/FortJacksonRHU  O*NET (Occupational Information Network) www.onetonline.org  Fort Jackson MWR Employment Readiness Program www.fortjacksonmwr.com/acs_emp/index.html (Click: “Job Search Links”)  Virtual Career Library www.virtualcareerlibrary.com/jackson

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