Oregon Parent Training and Information Center Mission <ul><li>Our goal is to educate and support parents, families and pro...
“ Coming together is a beginning, Keeping together is progress, Working together is success.”  Henry Ford Parent Participa...
What we have in common <ul><li>Big expectations, little recognition or monetary reward </li></ul><ul><li>We work long hard...
Parent Involvement <ul><li>Includes several different forms of participation in education and with the schools. Parents ca...
Research Shows <ul><li>Parent involvement in children's learning is positively related to achievement.  </li></ul><ul><li>...
<ul><li>Research has established that the most successful parent participation efforts are those which offer parents a var...
Barriers to Collaboration <ul><li>Lack of Time </li></ul><ul><li>High Caseloads </li></ul><ul><li>Prior negative experienc...
More Barriers <ul><ul><li>Times of meetings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers hard to contact/ busy </li></ul></ul><ul><...
<ul><li>Investigators have identified lack of planning and lack of mutual understanding as the two greatest barriers to ef...
Five guiding principles for involving parents in schools <ul><li>A no-fault approach, focusing not on who is to blame but ...
Other guidelines include:  <ul><li>Communicate to parents that their involvement and support makes a great deal of differe...
ACTION OPTIONS:   Educators:   <ul><li>Seek out opportunities for  professional development and training in parent involve...
Professional development and training in parent involvement. <ul><li>Ballen and Moles (1994) describe basic components tha...
<ul><li>As the student populations of American schools continue to become increasingly diverse, teachers and administrator...
Parents:   <ul><li>Identify some ways to answer the question &quot; How can I be involved in my child's education? &quot; ...
Attributes of Successful Partnerships <ul><li>Mutual respect </li></ul><ul><li>Trust </li></ul><ul><li>Shared problem solv...
Elements of Collaboration <ul><li>Inclusive decision making </li></ul><ul><li>Caring attitudes </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing i...
Atmosphere: The Climate in Schools  for Families and Educators <ul><li>What is consistently advocated is that schools must...
CORE <ul><li>Connection:  </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Trust building </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Shared goals </li><...
CORE <ul><li>Respect: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Each person brings different, but equally valid expertise to the problem-s...
Involving the Uninvolved <ul><li>Newer school practices include: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Identifying families who are no...
Invitations and information, but also:   <ul><li>If the parent chooses not to participate, school personnel explain that t...
Top Ten Tools for Constructive Team Building <ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Patience </li></ul><ul><li>Flexibilit...
Tips for Parents <ul><li>Equal Partner </li></ul><ul><li>Express needs </li></ul><ul><li>Participate </li></ul><ul><li>Be ...
Tips for Professionals <ul><li>Value parent input </li></ul><ul><li>Respect involvement </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid Jargon </l...
<ul><li>Remember, there is no &quot;one size fits all&quot; answer </li></ul><ul><li>Set clear and measurable goals </li><...
Diversity <ul><li>Each person's map of the world is as unique as the person's thumbprint. There are no two people alike. N...
Contact Information <ul><li>Call us at 503-581-8156 or 888-505-2673 (toll-free in state only) </li></ul><ul><li>Help-line ...
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Oregon Parent Training and Information Center Mission

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  • Who do we serve Parents of children with disabilities including behavioral and mental health issues. Professionals in the education, health and human services fields
  • providing encouragement, arranging for appropriate study time and space, modeling desired behavior (such as reading for pleasure), monitoring homework, and actively tutoring their children at home.
  • This holds true for all types of parent involvement in children&apos;s learning and for all types and ages of students.
  • A cultural mismatch between the home and school environments can often hinder family involvement. Despite strong evidence that family involvement has significant benefits, many barriers to involvement exist for both the school and families. Teachers often lack the time and opportunity to work on family involvement. Staff misconceptions of families’ abilities create barriers to strong family involvement. In some schools, staff may feel that parents with limited educational backgrounds are unable to promote their children’s schooling. Research solidly disputes this belief: many low-income, poorly educated families support learning by frequently talking with their children about school, carefully monitoring activities, and clearly transmitting the belief that education is important.[5]  Many families do not feel welcome in schools, especially those who speak a language other than English. Other parents have bad experiences in school and feel unsure about the value of their contribution. Some family involvement programs require families to conform to school practices, rather than training educators to accommodate the cultures of or to incorporate the views of parents. Finally, some families simply lack the resources, especially time, to be more actively involved. When schools are aware of the issues facing families, they can better design family involvement activities that address and overcome the challenges that hinder families’ involvement.
  • Mutual Respect and Trust go together . We should act respectfully--acting in a way that shows respect for ourselves and respect for others. We need to trust that when a member of the team is talking from their area of expertise, that they are working for the good of the child. Shared problem solving involves listening to every member of the team, to allow all ideas to come to the discussion and not judge or dismiss ideas just because that’s not the way it is usually done. This is where “capacity” comes in. Allowing the expertise or accomplishments of individual team members to fill in the gaps. Common vision and goals. This is probably easier to accomplish in special education circles than in other partnerships, because goals are a major part of an IEP. Common vision is a little harder, because teachers and other school staff may have a different vision of the child than the parent does. It is important that the team has a common vision before they attempt to set goals, because it puts all the members of the team on the same page. The present level of educational performance is a part of the vision, but the PLEP doesn’t forecast, doesn’t evoke a vision of the child as he or she could be. Conflict is not the same as problem-solving, although it could involve problem solving techniques. For example conflict can come up when the vision of the child is very different between parent and school staff. It is far better for the relationships to acknowledge that there is a conflict, often just acknowledging it helps to diffuse it. Once it is acknowledged it can be dealt with. Focus: In business partnerships the focus is on the business goals. Everything that is done is done to promote the goals. In special education partnerships, the focus is on the child. Everything that is done should be directly related to accomplishing the goals on the IEP. If we can remember that it’s the child we are in partnership for, we will have a more productive, proactive partnership.
  • Self explanatory.
  • A family involvement program can serve as a forum for discussion and a conduit for change. Based on information from ongoing family-involvement programs, it&apos;s important to keep in mind the following points: Remember, there is no &amp;quot;one size fits all&amp;quot; answer to partnerships. Identify, with families, the strengths, interests and needs of families, students, and school staff and work from there. Set clear and measurable goals based on family and community input. Develop a variety of outreach mechanisms to inform families, businesses, and the community about family involvement policies and programs. These can include newsletters, flyers, personal contacts, slide shows, videotapes, local newspapers and cable TV, web sites, and public forums. Provide a varied menu of opportunities for participation geared to the diverse needs of families, including working families. Schedule programs and activities flexibly. Recognize that effective family involvement takes many forms that may not necessarily require parents&apos; presence at a workshop, meeting, or school. Ensure that families and students have complete information about the standards students are expected to meet, examples of student work that meets these standards, and understanding of how students will be assessed. For example, hold curriculum nights to feature the standards and exhibit student work. Provide workshops about the state&apos;s testing program, with a chance for parents to take the test. Ensure that families and students have access to information about nutrition and health care, after-school programs, and community service agencies. Recognize how a community&apos;s historic, ethnic, linguistic, and cultural resources can generate interest in family-community participation. Hire and train a family coordinator to act as a liaison between families and schools and to coordinate family activities. This coordinator should be bilingual as needed and sensitive to the needs of families and the community, including the non-English speaking community. Use creative forms of communication between educators and families that are personal, goal-oriented, and make optimal use of new communication technologies. One idea might be telephones in every classroom with voice-mail capacity. Find positive messages to send to all families about their child on at least once a month . In addition to parent-teacher conferences, offer regular opportunities for families to discuss their children&apos;s progress, raise concerns, and work as partners with school staff to solve problems that arise. To promote student success, create a support team for each student and include a family member. Make sure that family members acting as volunteers in the school have opportunities to help teachers in meaningful ways such as assisting with instructional tasks and administrative functions. In addition to being tutors and classroom aides, family members might speak to students about their careers, explain customs from their cultural traditions, or demonstrate a special skill. Provide professional development opportunities for educators and families to enable them to work together effectively as partners in the educational process. Involve families in evaluating the effectiveness of family involvement programs and activities on a regular basis and use this information to improve them.  National Coalition for parent involvement in education
  • Oregon Parent Training and Information Center Mission

    1. 1. Oregon Parent Training and Information Center Mission <ul><li>Our goal is to educate and support parents, families and professionals in building partnerships that meet the needs of children and youth with the full range of disabilities ages birth to twenty-six. </li></ul>
    2. 2. “ Coming together is a beginning, Keeping together is progress, Working together is success.” Henry Ford Parent Participation Oregon Parent Training and Information Center
    3. 3. What we have in common <ul><li>Big expectations, little recognition or monetary reward </li></ul><ul><li>We work long hard hours </li></ul><ul><li>We care about our children </li></ul>
    4. 4. Parent Involvement <ul><li>Includes several different forms of participation in education and with the schools. Parents can </li></ul><ul><li>Attend school functions </li></ul><ul><li>Respond to school obligations (parent-teacher conferences, for example). </li></ul><ul><li>Volunteer at school </li></ul><ul><li>Help their children improve their schoolwork </li></ul>
    5. 5. Research Shows <ul><li>Parent involvement in children's learning is positively related to achievement. </li></ul><ul><li>The more intensively parents are involved in their children's learning, the more beneficial are the achievement effects. </li></ul><ul><li>The most effective forms of parent involvement are those which engage parents in working directly with their children on learning activities in the home. </li></ul><ul><li>The more active forms of parent involvement produce greater achievement benefits than the more passive ones. </li></ul><ul><li>Considerably greater achievement benefits are noted when parent involvement is active--when parents work with their children at home, certainly, but also when they attend and actively support school activities and when they help out in classrooms or on field trips, and so on. </li></ul><ul><li>The earlier in a child's education that parent involvement begins, the more powerful the effects will be. </li></ul>
    6. 6. <ul><li>Research has established that the most successful parent participation efforts are those which offer parents a variety of roles in the context of a well-organized and long-lasting program. Parents will need to be able to choose from a range of activities which accommodate different schedules, preferences, and capabilities. As part of the planning process, teachers and administrators will need to assess their own readiness for involving parents and determine how they wish to engage and utilize them. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Barriers to Collaboration <ul><li>Lack of Time </li></ul><ul><li>High Caseloads </li></ul><ul><li>Prior negative experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Belief that families cause disorders </li></ul><ul><li>High expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Inadequate Knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Isolated Families </li></ul><ul><li>Power imbalance </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of support for staff </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of Trust </li></ul><ul><li>Miscommunication </li></ul>
    8. 8. More Barriers <ul><ul><li>Times of meetings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers hard to contact/ busy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Language </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unsure how to support students </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lack of Support staff </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Little return for effort </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dwindling support over time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>As students get older parents less involved </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Competing demands </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. <ul><li>Investigators have identified lack of planning and lack of mutual understanding as the two greatest barriers to effective parent involvement. School staff wishing to institute effective programs will need to be both openminded and well-organized in their approach to engaging parent participation. </li></ul>
    10. 10. Five guiding principles for involving parents in schools <ul><li>A no-fault approach, focusing not on who is to blame but on what can be done. </li></ul><ul><li>Coordination and cooperation among all adults concerned with the child's best educational interests. </li></ul><ul><li>Decision by consensus whenever possible. </li></ul><ul><li>Regular meetings representing the entire school community. </li></ul><ul><li>Active involvement of parents. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Comer and Haynes (1992) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Other guidelines include: <ul><li>Communicate to parents that their involvement and support makes a great deal of difference in their children's school performance, and that they need not be highly educated or have large amounts of free time for their involvement to be beneficial. Make this point repeatedly. </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage parent involvement from the time children first enter school (or preschool, if they attend). </li></ul><ul><li>Teach parents that activities such as modeling reading behavior and reading to their children increase children's interest in learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop parent involvement programs that include a focus on parent involvement in instruction--conducting learning activities with children in the home, assisting with homework, and monitoring and encouraging the learning activities of older students. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide orientation and training for parents, but remember that intensive, long-lasting training is neither necessary nor feasible. </li></ul><ul><li>Make a special effort to engage the involvement of parents of disadvantaged students, who stand to benefit the most from parent participation in their learning, but whose parents are often initially reluctant to become involved. </li></ul><ul><li>Continue to emphasize that parents are partners of the school and that their involvement is needed and valued. </li></ul>
    12. 12. ACTION OPTIONS: Educators: <ul><li>Seek out opportunities for professional development and training in parent involvement . </li></ul><ul><li>Make parents feel welcome in the school. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide a parent center for parents to use while at school. </li></ul><ul><li>Reach out to parents whose first language is not English. </li></ul><ul><li>Learn about the various ethnic, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds of the students and know how to communicate with diverse families. </li></ul><ul><li>Accommodate parents' work schedules when creating parent-involvement opportunities. </li></ul><ul><li>Assign homework projects that engage each child's parents and family and make learning more meaningful for the student, such as a family history, interviews with grandparents, or descriptions of parents' daily work. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep parents informed of their children's performance and school activities by means of notes, telephone calls, newsletters, conferences, and meetings. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide clear, practical information on home-teaching techniques for parents of children who need extra help at home. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide opportunities for parents to visit the school, observe classes, and provide feedback. </li></ul><ul><li>Start the school year with an opening conference . </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a plan to promote teacher-parent partnerships at school. </li></ul><ul><li>Invite parents to serve on school or district committees. </li></ul>
    13. 13. Professional development and training in parent involvement. <ul><li>Ballen and Moles (1994) describe basic components that could be included in such training: </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;Schools and school systems seldom offer staff any formal training in collaborating with parents or in understanding the varieties of modern family life. However, both the National Education Association and the American Federation of Teachers are working to make such information and skills widely available....There are myriad ways for families to become more involved in schools, and training can help teachers and other school staff change the traditional images of contacting parents only when a student is in trouble or when the school needs help with a bake sale. Teacher training programs can include general information on the benefits of and barriers to parental involvement, information on awareness of different family backgrounds and lifestyles, techniques for improving two-way communication between home and school, information on ways to involve parents in helping their children learn in school and outside, and ways that schools can help meet families' social, educational, and social service needs.&quot; </li></ul>
    14. 14. <ul><li>As the student populations of American schools continue to become increasingly diverse, teachers and administrators may benefit from learning about their students' various ethnic, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds. Such knowledge is beneficial in helping educators reach out to families and encouraging parents to become involved in the school. </li></ul>
    15. 15. Parents: <ul><li>Identify some ways to answer the question &quot; How can I be involved in my child's education? &quot; and select from among 50 ways parents can help schools , especially those that help promote meaningful, engaged learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Read to younger children. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide a variety of reading materials in the home and frequently take children to the library. </li></ul><ul><li>Promote school attendance and discourage absenteeism. </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor children's television viewing. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide a quiet place for children to do homework; help with or check homework every night. </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage children to participate in learning activities when school is not in session. (Activities that include parents are found in Summer Home Learning Recipes .) </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage children's efforts in school. </li></ul><ul><li>Help children choose appropriate preparatory courses in middle, junior high, and high school. </li></ul><ul><li>Remain aware of the importance of parent involvement at the secondary school level and continue to stay involved. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep in touch with children's teachers. </li></ul><ul><li>Volunteer to participate in school activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Participate in school-improvement efforts and join advisory or decision-making committees. </li></ul><ul><li>Look for innovative ways to improve schools, such as helping to organize public schools called charter schools . </li></ul>
    16. 16. Attributes of Successful Partnerships <ul><li>Mutual respect </li></ul><ul><li>Trust </li></ul><ul><li>Shared problem solving </li></ul><ul><li>Common vision and goals </li></ul><ul><li>Conflicts, when present, are openly acknowledged and addressed </li></ul><ul><li>Focus </li></ul>
    17. 17. Elements of Collaboration <ul><li>Inclusive decision making </li></ul><ul><li>Caring attitudes </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing information </li></ul><ul><li>Consideration of cultural factors </li></ul><ul><li>Trust </li></ul><ul><li>Considering the whole child </li></ul><ul><li>Responsive services </li></ul><ul><li>Families as a resource </li></ul>
    18. 18. Atmosphere: The Climate in Schools for Families and Educators <ul><li>What is consistently advocated is that schools must be welcoming, “family friendly” communities. </li></ul><ul><li>True collaboration occurs with CORE - when these ingredients are present: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Connection </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Optimism </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Respect </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Empowerment </li></ul></ul></ul>
    19. 19. CORE <ul><li>Connection: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Trust building </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Shared goals </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Common vision </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Conflict resolution </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Optimism: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Problems are systems, not individual, problems. (interface) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>No one person is to blame. (nonblaming, solution-oriented) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>All concerned parties are doing the best they can. (nonjugmental, perspective taking) </li></ul></ul></ul>
    20. 20. CORE <ul><li>Respect: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Each person brings different, but equally valid expertise to the problem-solving process. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Respect requires acceptance of differences, especially perceptions about child’s performance. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Empowerment: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Both parties have strengths and competencies. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Parents believe they can help. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Parents know a role for which they feel comfortable. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Parents see that their efforts make a difference in achievement. </li></ul></ul></ul>
    21. 21. Involving the Uninvolved <ul><li>Newer school practices include: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Identifying families who are not responding to current outreach and making a personal contact. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Keeping interaction focused on genuine interest in improving the child’s school success. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Understanding parents’ goals for their children’s education. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Being persistent about the importance of a family learning environment. </li></ul></ul></ul>
    22. 22. Invitations and information, but also: <ul><li>If the parent chooses not to participate, school personnel explain that they will do their part at school; however, they make it clear that this is only part of the equation for school success. We know children perform better if the school and home work together to achieve a shared goal for the child’s learning. Without in- and out-of-school time devoted to reading, the probability the child will perform less well on school tasks is increased. </li></ul>
    23. 23. Top Ten Tools for Constructive Team Building <ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Patience </li></ul><ul><li>Flexibility </li></ul><ul><li>Assertiveness </li></ul><ul><li>Endurance </li></ul><ul><li>Creativity </li></ul><ul><li>Commitment </li></ul><ul><li>Honesty </li></ul><ul><li>Appreciation </li></ul><ul><li>Chocolate </li></ul>
    24. 24. Tips for Parents <ul><li>Equal Partner </li></ul><ul><li>Express needs </li></ul><ul><li>Participate </li></ul><ul><li>Be Prepared </li></ul><ul><li>Develop Mutual Goals </li></ul><ul><li>Put Away Negative Experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Follow through </li></ul><ul><li>Involvement with other Parents </li></ul><ul><li>Consider Time </li></ul><ul><li>No Bashing </li></ul><ul><li>Support the Team </li></ul>
    25. 25. Tips for Professionals <ul><li>Value parent input </li></ul><ul><li>Respect involvement </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid Jargon </li></ul><ul><li>Solicit involvement </li></ul><ul><li>Schedule at convenient times </li></ul><ul><li>Commit to the Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Connect Families </li></ul><ul><li>Convey interest </li></ul><ul><li>Be honest </li></ul>
    26. 26. <ul><li>Remember, there is no &quot;one size fits all&quot; answer </li></ul><ul><li>Set clear and measurable goals </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a variety of outreach mechanisms </li></ul><ul><li>Provide a varied opportunities for participation </li></ul><ul><li>Give families and students complete information expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Recognize a community's historic, ethnic, linguistic, and cultural resources </li></ul><ul><li>Hire and train a family coordinator </li></ul><ul><li>Use creative forms of communication between educators and families </li></ul><ul><li>Find positive messages to send to all families </li></ul><ul><li>Offer regular opportunities for families to discuss their children's progress </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure that family members acting as volunteers in the school have opportunities to help teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Provide professional development opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Involve families in evaluating the effectiveness of family involvement programs </li></ul><ul><li>NCPIE </li></ul>
    27. 27. Diversity <ul><li>Each person's map of the world is as unique as the person's thumbprint. There are no two people alike. No two people who understand the same sentence the same way .  .  . So in dealing with people, you try not to fit them to your concept of what they should be. -- MILTON ERICKSON </li></ul>
    28. 28. Contact Information <ul><li>Call us at 503-581-8156 or 888-505-2673 (toll-free in state only) </li></ul><ul><li>Help-line 888-891-6784 </li></ul><ul><li>Fax us at: 503-391-0429 </li></ul><ul><li>E-mail us at: info@orpti.org </li></ul><ul><li>Website - http://www.orpti.org </li></ul>

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