Synopsis of Freedom    1 
    
                                                

Running Head:  SYNOPSIS OF FREEDOM 

   ...
 Synopsis of Freedom    2 
     
                               Synopsis of Freedom by Zygmunt Bauman 

        Zygmunt Ba...
 Synopsis of Freedom    3 
     
direction to an inward direction and to himself. The division of labor further contribute...
 Synopsis of Freedom    4 
    
                                             References 

Bauman Z. (1988). Freedom. Minne...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Freedom by zygmunt bauman a synopsis

5,041 views

Published on

Published in: Economy & Finance, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
5,041
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
9
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
74
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Freedom by zygmunt bauman a synopsis

  1. 1.  Synopsis of Freedom    1      Running Head:  SYNOPSIS OF FREEDOM          Synopsis of Freedom by Zygmunt Bauman  Diane Fittipaldi  University of St. Thomas  September 7, 2008  EDLD 913
  2. 2.  Synopsis of Freedom    2    Synopsis of Freedom by Zygmunt Bauman    Zygmunt Bauman (1988) regards freedom as a condition where one’s motives shape one’s  actions and where those actions result in the desired outcome.  In Freedom. Bauman argues against the  popular notion that freedom exists as a universal condition.  Instead Bauman maintains that modern  society constructed freedom as a social creation, ostensibly as a development of capitalism and  therefore born out of power and privilege. In advancing this theory, Bauman employs three specific  themes. First, Bauman develops the relational aspects of freedom, the notion that freedom for some  exists only in relation to the lack of freedom by others.  Secondly, Bauman dives deeply into the  influence capitalism exerts on modern freedoms.  Lastly, Bauman reviews the role of government in  restricting the freedom of the under‐privileged.  At the conclusion, Bauman briefly offers an alternative,  leaving readers with a hypothesis for further exploration.  In this paper, I will review each of these  themes and conclude with questions I have which merit further discussion.    In the first chapter of Freedom (1998), Bauman uses the Michel Foucault’s interpretation of  Jeremy Bentham’s Panopticon, to offer insights into the relational theory of freedom. Originally an  architectural design for a prison, a panopticon provides the ultimate in universal control via a set up  where the prisoners cannot see their guards leaving uncertainty as to the level of supervision. In  contrast, the guards can holistically see the prisoners thereby possessing special knowledge and the  power to use that knowledge for control. With this analogy, Bauman proposes that freedom can only  exist  in relation to those who are bound, or unfree. The ability of the prisoners to act depends on the  will of the free and powerful.  Bauman asserts that “for one to be free there must be two.” (p.9).  Freedom does not exists as a universal condition but as a relational condition within a societal structure.    Bauman devotes the next section of Freedom (1988) to the link between freedom and  capitalism.  Individualism lies at the base of this link. With the rise of means‐end calculus of capitalism,  man’s responsibilities to kin, clan and community shifted.  Man realigned his loyalties from an outward 
  3. 3.  Synopsis of Freedom    3    direction to an inward direction and to himself. The division of labor further contributed to this shift and  strengthened the link between freedom and capitalism.  Those with capital hold the resources to  employ those without capital, who possess only their labor to sell. This condition commoditizes people  as objects to be used rather than subjects free to act on their own.  Bauman continues linking freedom  and the free market system by demonstrating how the utility of goods and services has been eclipsed by  the symbolism represented by these goods. Bauman explains that the allure of these goods lies in the  power and privilege symbolized by their ownership. The resulting shift moves society from the goods  needed to live comfortably to the desire for goods that bring social acceptance and approval.    Lastly, Bauman (1988) explores the poor quality of public services and asks the question why  public policy ignores the needs of the unfree. Bauman asserts that public services such as transportation  and education offer inferior experiences compared to their private counterparts, setting up the desire of  individuals to buy one out of these conditions.  In turn, this further entrenches consumerism and the  power structure of the better offs. Bauman proposes the median voter theorem as the explanation for  why public policy remains ineffective in serving the unfree. Policy makers who seek election and  reelection focus on policies favoring the majority, leaving behind the needs of the poor and under‐ privileged. The resulting paradox is a system where policy makers find rewards in not serving the poor  and those who need public policy to assist them in becoming free remain without the resources to affect  change.    Bauman (1988) concludes Freedom with a brief section on communalism offering an alternative  to the freedom/unfreedom dichotomy. According to Bauman, a system with greater local control and  community participation will slowly shift our current system of private freedom and privilege to a public  freedom.  Intriguing as this sounds, as a reader I am left with the question of how might we move from  theory to practice?  With capitalism so vastly entrenched not only in our economy but in our societal  value systems, where is this change going to come and how might it be powerful enough to work? 
  4. 4.  Synopsis of Freedom    4    References  Bauman Z. (1988). Freedom. Minneapolis, Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press. 

×