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Learnings from sleep: Firstbeat big data – Tero Myllymaki, Physiology Research, Firstbeat

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“If sleep does not serve an absolutely vital function, then it is the biggest mistake the evolutionary process has ever made." The importance of sleep for recovery is starting to be appreciated and research into the area is only increasing. But what do we really know about how to get ‘good sleep’? And how do sleeping patterns differ from country to country? Tero Myllymaki presented findings from the Firstbeat database showcasing the different sleep trends in the UK, Finland and Hungary whilst highlighting the importance of finding “what works for you” to help reduce stress and boost the chance overnight recovery.

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Learnings from sleep: Firstbeat big data – Tero Myllymaki, Physiology Research, Firstbeat

  1. 1. LEARNINGS FROM SLEEP: FIRSTBEAT BIG DATA Tero Myllymäki Head of Physiology Research, Firstbeat Firstbeat HRV summit 2018
  2. 2. THE ULTIMATE FUNCTION OF SLEEP? Schmidt MH (2014). The energy allocation function of sleep: A unifying theory of sleep, torpor, and continuous wakefulness. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 47: 122-153
  3. 3. SIMPLIFIED VERSION “If sleep does not serve an absolutely vital function, then it is the biggest mistake the evolutionary process has ever made” Allan Rechtschaffen
  4. 4. HOW SLEEP RECOVERS Sleep is body’s active and dynamic process to recover Early night is dominated by deep sleep (protein synthesis, growth hormone secretion) Latter part of the night is dominated by REM sleep (dreaming, processing information) Physical recovery Mental recovery R N1 N2 N3 AWAKE LIGHT SLEEP DEEP SLEEP SNOOZING PARTIALLY AWAKE, BODY MOVEMENTS time
  5. 5. • Good sleep consists of adequate sleep duration and sleep quality 1,2 • Age-based recommendations for healthy sleep, e.g. 7-9 hours for adults • Recommended quality metrics of sleep: sleeping enough, falling asleep in 30min or less, waking up no more than once per night, having efficient and continuous sleep • Certain spectrum of sleep phases present: descriptive recommendations exists, and first consensus statement of recommendations available 2 • ANS plays a key role in recovery and sleep as ANS reflects the restoration of physiological systems and is associated also with sleep stages and onset of sleep 3 • Firstbeat uses HRV to measure the physiological recovery during sleep – the ultimate effect of sleep! WHAT IS GOOD SLEEP 1 Hirskowitz et al. (2015). National Sleep Foundation’s sleep time duration recommendations: methodology and results summary. Sleep Health, 1 (1): 40-43. 2 Ohayon et al. (2017). National Sleep Foundation's sleep quality recommendations: first report. Sleep Health, 3 (1): 6-19. 3 Tobaldini et al. (2013). Heart rate variability in normal and pathological sleep, Frontiers in Physiology, 4: 4-11. Recommended Amount of Sleep for a Healthy Adult: A Joint Consensus Statement of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and Sleep Research Society 2015: “Sleeping less than 7 hours per night on a regular basis is associated with adverse health outcomes, including: • weight gain and obesity • diabetes • hypertension • heart disease and stroke • depression • increased risk of death • impaired immune function • increased pain • impaired performance • increased errors • and greater risk of accidents.”
  6. 6. THE PROCESS OF GATHERING BIG DATA THROUGH PHYSIOLOGY BASED COACHING LEARN FROM DATA MAKE LIFESTYLE CHANGES MEASURE 300,000 measured days from Nordics 30,000 measured days from the UK 4,000 measured days from Hungary with Firstbeat Bodyguard 2 device
  7. 7. FACILITATORS OF GOOD SLEEP: WHAT THE BIG DATA TELLS?
  8. 8. FACILITATORS OF GOOD SLEEP AVOIDING ALCOHOL Recovery minutes during sleep Doses of alcohol * * In relation to person weighting 80kg
  9. 9. Pietilä et al. 2018. Acute effect of alcohol intake on cardiovascular autonomic regulation during the first hours of sleep in a large real-world sample of Finnish employees. JMIR Mental Health = without alcohol = low-dose group (≤0.25g/kg) = medium-dose group (>0.25-0.75g/kg) = high-dose group (>0.75g/kg) + Original data included 111,025 monitoring days from Firstbeat database
  10. 10. FACILITATORS OF GOOD SLEEP SLEEPING ENOUGH Recovery minutes By sleeping shortly it’s impossible to give body enough time to recover
  11. 11. FACILITATORS OF GOOD SLEEP KEEPING FIT AND STAYING ACTIVE
  12. 12. FACILITATORS OF GOOD SLEEP FINDING PERSONAL WAYS TO CALM DOWN Deep breathing exercise Relax w/ ”mindless” TV after work Meditation helps you slow down! Day-off: afternoon nap 30 mins Tea & talk w/ girlfriend
  13. 13. ACTIVITIES WHICH TYPICALLY STRESS Being in a work meeting Being on a computer Eating Watching TV Driving a car ACTIVITIES WHICH TYPICALLY RELAX Night’s sleep Taking a nap Reading Relaxation session Watching TV Work meetings elicit stress response in 76% of their time Naps are half as good in recovering us than night’s sleep
  14. 14. RHYTHMS OF RECOVERY IN THE NORDICS, UK AND HUNGARY
  15. 15. HOURLY RHYTHMS OF RECOVERY
  16. 16. DAILY RHYTHMS OF RECOVERY h
  17. 17. YEAR-ROUND RHYTHMS OF RECOVERY UK Nordics
  18. 18. SATISFACTION ON SLEEP Hungary 41% UK 47% Nordics 51% Proportion of persons who partly or fully agrees to sleep enough
  19. 19. RYTHMS OF MEN AND WOMEN PERCEIVED STRESS IN UK MEN WOMEN ”I feel stressed”
  20. 20. MEN WOMEN RYTHMS OF MEN AND WOMEN SLEEP DURATION IN UK
  21. 21. RYTHMS OF MEN AND WOMEN RECOVERY DURING SLEEP IN UK
  22. 22. THANK YOU! Tero Myllymäki tero.myllymaki@firstbeat.com www.firstbeat.com #firstbeat Firstbeat Technologies Firstbeat Technologies Ltd@FirstbeatInfo @firstbeat_technologies

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