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Wireline to Wireless: Band-Aid or Network Concept 2016

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Steve Leek, Broadband Systems Manager at Finley presented this detailed topic at the ISE Show in 2016.

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Wireline to Wireless: Band-Aid or Network Concept 2016

  1. 1. 1 ISE EXPO Wireline to Wireless: Band-Aid or Network Concept Steve Leek Broadband Systems Manager s.leek@fecinc.com FINLEY ENGINEERING COMPANY, INC. www.fecinc.com Twitter: @FinleyEng
  2. 2. 1. Fiber a. GPON b. Active c. Transport 1. Backhaul 2. Front haul 1. Copper a. DSL-VDSL-Pair Bonding Limited by distance 1. HFC / Coaxial a. DOCSIS System Limited by channels used Wired Network Infrastructures www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  3. 3. 1. GPON (ITU-T G.984.5X) A. 1480nm – 1500nm Downstream Traffic 1. 1490 nm - OLT to ONT Voice & Data B. 1260 – 1360 nm - Upstream Traffic 1. 1310 nm - OLT to ONT Voice & Data Return C. 1410 -1610 nm Return Traffic VOD Authorization D. 1550 nm RF Overlay E. 1625 nm In Service OTDR Trace for Macro Bending 2. XG-PON 1 (ITU-T G.987) 10 G Dowstream Traffic @ 1577 nm 2.5 G Upstream Traffic @ 1270 nm 3. NG-PON 2 (ITU-T G.989) 4-8 Streams of 10 G Downstream Traffic @ 1596 – 1603 nm 4-8 Streams of 2.5 G Upstream Traffic @ 1532 – 1539 nm P2P 10 G Down & UP 1610 – 1625 nm 4. XGS-PON 2 (ITU-T G.9807.1) 10 G Downstream Traffic @ 1577 nm 10 G Upstream Traffic @ 1270 nm Wavelengths www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  4. 4. ISP Voice Video Wireline to Wireless Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek www.FinleyUSA.com
  5. 5. Wireline to Wireless www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  6. 6. Plan & Build for 30 - 40 Year Life Span Bandwidth Demand Will Increase Wireline to Wireless www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  7. 7. www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  8. 8. Tower Research www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  9. 9. Tower Research www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  10. 10. Frequency Research 10
  11. 11. 1. Point to Point Microwave a. Licensed b. lightly Licensed c. Unlicensed, 2. Point to Multi-point a. Mesh 3. Wi-Fi 4. Cell Service Wireless Network Infrastructures www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  12. 12. 1. 6 – 38 GhZ 2. 1+0 one ODU & 1 Dish 3. 1+1 two ODU’s and 1 dish – Hot Standby Units 4. 2+0 two ODU’s and 1 Dish both transmitting- doubles bandwidth 5. Ambient temperature limits 6. Max operating temperature 7. Wind velocity 8. Peak survival wind velocity 9. IF cable lengths 10. Throughput 11. Unlicensed PTP Licensed Radios www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  13. 13. PTP Alignment www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  14. 14. 1. Determine Channel width –5 MhZ = 21 Miles –10 MhZ = 17 Miles –20 Mhz = 13 Miles –40 Mhz = 9 Miles 2. Link Capacity – somewhat less than Quality 3. Link Quality 4. 5.8 GhZ, 2.4 GhZ & 900 Mhz 5. 3.65 GhZ Lightly Licensed Point to Multi-Point www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  15. 15. www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  16. 16. Point to Multi-Point Mesh Network www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  17. 17. Line of Sight www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  18. 18. Non-Line of Sight Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  19. 19. www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek 475 Subscribers
  20. 20. 475 Subscribers www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  21. 21. 790 Subscribers www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  22. 22. Why the push to increase bandwidth? Will subscribers use 300 to 500 megabits or 1 gigabit per second? Consider: – Over-the-top streaming, especially at 4K speeds or future data bandwidths – Super HD requires around 6-12 Mbps – Ultra HD will require between 15-20 Mbps Todays needs require 50 Mbps. Can you make higher speeds affordable to more than 80% of your homes passed? Specifically, can you provide 75 Mbps or more for the same rate as 12 Mbps and make more money in the process? Deployment Questions www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  23. 23. 802.11n development started in 2002 and was approved in 2009, using "dual-band" (2.4/5 GHz). 802.11ac development started in 2011 and was approved in January 2014. 802.11ac utilizes dual band wireless technology, supporting simultaneous connections on both the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz bands. The IEEE 802.11ad standard is aimed at providing data throughput speeds of up to 7 Gbps. To achieve these speeds the technology uses the 60 GHz ISM band to achieve the levels of bandwidth needed and ensure reduced interference levels. 802.11ax unlike 802.ad uses a standard, 5GHz in house Wi-Fi based technology. A single 802.11ax stream using MIMO should be capable of 3.5Gbps compared with 866Mbs for a single 802.11ac providing a total network of capacity for 14Gbps. Wi-Fi Standards www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  24. 24. 802.11ax is already coming down the pipe — and unlike 802.11ad, it uses a standard, 5GHz- in house Wi-Fi based technology. A single 802.11ax stream using MIMO should be capable of 3.5Gbps compared with 866Mbs for a single 802.11ac providing a total network of capacity for 14Gbps. The standard should be complete in July 2018. However, ratification of the standard is not expected before March 2019. A key change in 802.11ax will be the use of MIMO-OFDA, which combines multiple antennas (the MIMO, multiple in-multiple out, part) with orthogonal frequency division multiple access (which is abbreviated OFDMA ). 802.ax www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  25. 25. OFDA www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek A key change in 802.11ax will be the use of MIMO-OFDA, which combines multiple antennas (the MIMO, multiple in-multiple out, part) with orthogonal frequency division multiple access (which is abbreviated OFDMA ). OFDA is based on existing OFDMA schemes, which encode data on multiple subcarrier frequencies. OFDM is already used in LTE and earlier Wi-Fi standards. But OFDA adds a new twist, the multiple-access component, meaning subsets are assigned within those subcarrier frequencies to essentially create a bigger pipe delivering data to individual devices.
  26. 26. www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek IEEE 802.16d (fixed service) uses Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM). IEEE 802.16e (mobile) uses Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access (OFDMA). OFDMA is a multi-user OFDM that allows multiple access on the same channel (a channel being a group of evenly spaced subcarriers. WiMAX uses OFDMA, extended OFDM, to accommodate many users in the same channel at the same time.
  27. 27. Translation 1.Trying to dance the polka to rock and roll music. 2.Forgetting your Mother-in-Law’s first name. 3.Noticing someone at the church dinner using his lefsa for a napkin. UFF DA www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  28. 28. Heat Map
  29. 29. Heat Mapper Information you need to verify: 1. Access Points 2. SSID Information 3. Signal quality / Signal Strength 4. Signal-to Noise-Ratio 5. Data Rates 6. Devices Connected 7. Channel Usage 8. Rogue Access Points 9. Connection Tests a. associate with an AP b. request an IP address from its DHCP Server c. ping or perform a TCP handshake with the server or other addresses. Wi-Fi Inspection www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  30. 30. Security Encryption www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek 31 Interference from 1. Microwave 2. Cordless Phones/headsets 3. Bluetooth Devices 4. Analog Video Cameras 9. Security Encryption a. WEP – 1990 still used b. WPA c. WPA2-Wi-Fi Certified – 2006 Government Grade
  31. 31. Mitigation: The action of reducing the severity, seriousness, or painfulness of something TSB-155-A specifies recommended mitigation practices in the event that an installed category 6 channel does not satisfy the minimum crosstalk levels. 1. Proper routing of cables using BICISI wiring standards. 2. improved cross connect jumpers. 3. Using F/UTP equipment cords. 4. Unbundling cables. 5. Reconfiguring cross-connects as interconnects, and 6. Replacing category 6 components with higher bandwidth cables or fiber. Building Cable Standards TSB-155 www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  32. 32. IP Traffic www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek 1 EB = 10006 bytes = 1018 bytes = 1000000000000000000B = 1000 petabytes = 1million terabytes = 1billion gigabytes
  33. 33. The First generation wireless mobile communication systems were introduced in early eighties and second generations systems in the late 1980s were intended primarily for transmission of voice. The third and forth generation wireless systems which are just getting introduced in the world markets offer considerably higher data rates, with significant improvements over the 2G systems. The 3G Wireless systems were proposed to provide voice and paging services to provide interactive multimedia including teleconferencing and internet access and variety of other services. As opposed to earlier generations, a 4G system does not support traditional circuit-switched telephony service, is more a IP based communication such as VOIP. First Generation Wireless www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  34. 34. Wireless Speeds www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  35. 35. Mobile Network Operator www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek Mobile Telephone Switching Office
  36. 36. Similar concept, which links the mobile network back to the wired network. In essence, front haul is the connection between a new network architecture of centralized baseband controllers and remote standalone radio heads at cell sites. Backhaul / Front Haul www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  37. 37. The term LTE stands for Long Term Evolution. Hence, 4G LTE means the fourth- generation Long Term Evolution network.. Unlike 4G networks, the 4G LTE versions are relatively new and their coverage is limited to specific areas.. Modern cellular devices that support 4G LTE networks include the iPhone 6 Plus, the iPhone 6, the iPhone 5S and the iPhone 5c. LTE www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  38. 38. We are hearing a lot of noise about 5G although not expected to make its commercial debut until at least 2018 - 2020, 5G trials and collaborations are being held this year. 4G tests have provided network speeds between 2 – 6 Meg with a latency between 128 – 214 milliseconds. This will require many more cell towers/access points, that cover entire neighborhoods. An example of the lower latency is a 5G connected car could report an accident before the airbags were fully inflated. Faster arrival at incidents is a key use for 5G. Along with today’s vehicles the beginning use of future autonomous vehicles. 5G Cell Service www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek The vision for 5G includes network speeds of 20 Gbps or higher with a latency that is mere milliseconds. The vision for 5G includes network speeds of 20 Gbps or higher with a latency that is mere milliseconds.
  39. 39. These systems will be built in a way to enable logical 5G network slices, enabling operators to provide networks on an as-a-service basis and meet the wide range of use cases the 2020 timeframe will demand. This single physical network can be partitioned into multiple virtual networks to offer optimal support for different types of services and for different types of customer segments. 5G Cell Service www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek Mobile Carriers will use the 5G network slicing in order to provide a broadband experience everywhere with more video, higher speeds, and wide-scale availability; massive machine- type communication with transportation monitoring and control.
  40. 40. THz Wireless www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  41. 41. In order to achieve this, equipment would transmit between 275 – 305 GhZ using quadrature amplitude modulation QAM QAM www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  42. 42. The Shannon–Hartley theorem tells the maximum rate at which information can be transmitted over a communications channel of a specified bandwidth in the presence of noise. Bandwidth limitations alone do not impose a theoretical limit on throughput – remember multiple channels increase interference. LTE-U technology, which uses the same unlicensed frequency as Wi-Fi to provide additional bandwidth to mobile carriers, is already in limited testing by Verizon. Carriers are enthused about LTE-U’s potential to ease the load on their networks, but critics – warn that the technology could drown out Wi-Fi networks where they overlap. Ericsson Reported to FCC on September 6th that their testing caused no issues with Wi-Fi. www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek
  43. 43. May da ruts always fit da wheels in your pickup, May yur ear mufs always keep out da nort wind, May da sun shine varm on yur lefse, May da rain fall soft on yur lutefisk, and until ve meet again May da Good Lord protect ya from any and all unnecessary Uff Das. Norwegian Blessing www.FinleyUSA.com Wireline to Wireless Steve Leek

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