Practical Leadership

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  • Practical Leadership

    1. 1. Leadership By: Anthony Gomes
    2. 2. A Person or Thing that Leads Source: Dictionary.com
    3. 3. A guiding or directing head, as of an army, movement, or political group Source: Dictionary.com
    4. 4. Leadership Qualities
    5. 5. Traditional Leadership Qualities: Adaptable to Situations Alert to Social Environments Ambitious and Achievement Orientated Assertive Cooperative Decisive Dependable Energetic Persistent Self Confident Tolerant of Stress Willing to assume Responsibility Dominant (Desire to Influence Others) Source: Stewart Associates UK
    6. 6. My List of Leadership Qualities:
    7. 7. My List of Leadership Qualities: Always Lead from the Front
    8. 8. My List of Leadership Qualities: Always Lead from the Front Be Willing to Be UnPopular
    9. 9. My List of Leadership Qualities: Always Lead from the Front Be Willing to Be UnPopular Carpe Diem (Seize The Day)
    10. 10. My List of Leadership Qualities: Always Lead from the Front Be Willing to Be UnPopular Carpe Diem (Seize The Day) Recognize when to Lead
    11. 11. My List of Leadership Qualities: Always Lead from the Front Be Willing to Be UnPopular Carpe Diem (Seize The Day) Recognize when to Lead Recognize when to Follow
    12. 12. My List of Leadership Qualities: Always Lead from the Front Be Willing to Be UnPopular Carpe Diem (Seize The Day) Recognize when to Lead Recognize when to Follow Identify Weakness & Strengthen It
    13. 13. My List of Leadership Qualities: Always Lead from the Front Be Willing to Be UnPopular Carpe Diem (Seize The Day) Recognize when to Lead Recognize when to Follow Identify Weakness & Strengthen It Keep an Open Mind
    14. 14. My List of Leadership Qualities: Always Lead from the Front Be Willing to Be UnPopular Carpe Diem (Seize The Day) Recognize when to Lead Recognize when to Follow Identify Weakness & Strengthen It Keep an Open Mind Present Solutions Not Problems
    15. 15. My List of Leadership Qualities: Always Lead from the Front Be Willing to Be UnPopular Carpe Diem (Seize The Day) Recognize when to Lead Recognize when to Follow Identify Weakness & Strengthen It Keep an Open Mind Present Solutions Not Problems If You Don’t Know Don’t Speak
    16. 16. My List of Leadership Qualities: Always Lead from the Front Be Willing to Be UnPopular Carpe Diem (Seize The Day) Recognize when to Lead Recognize when to Follow Identify Weakness & Strengthen It Keep an Open Mind Present Solutions Not Problems If You Don’t Know Don’t Speak If You Know Care Enough to Speak
    17. 17. My List of Leadership Qualities: Always Lead from the Front Be Willing to Be UnPopular Carpe Diem (Seize The Day) Recognize when to Lead Recognize when to Follow Identify Weakness & Strengthen It Keep an Open Mind Present Solutions Not Problems If You Don’t Know Don’t Speak If You Know Care Enough to Speak Learn Different Leadership Models
    18. 18. Things that don’t automatically make you a Leader:
    19. 19. Things that don’t automatically make you a Leader: Position, Status, or Title
    20. 20. Things that don’t automatically make you a Leader: Position, Status, or Title Education, Degrees, or Salutations
    21. 21. Things that don’t automatically make you a Leader: Position, Status, or Title Education, Degrees, or Salutations Age
    22. 22. Things that don’t automatically make you a Leader: Position, Status, or Title Education, Degrees, or Salutations Age Seniority
    23. 23. Ways to Develop Your Leadership Abilities
    24. 24. Live Leadership
    25. 25. Live Leadership Take Time to Recognize when You Exemplify One, or More, of the Leadership Qualities
    26. 26. Live Leadership Take Time to Recognize when You Exemplify One, or More, of the Leadership Qualities Put Yourself In Situations that Force You to be a Leader
    27. 27. Live Leadership Take Time to Recognize when You Exemplify One, or More, of the Leadership Qualities Put Yourself In Situations that Force You to be a Leader Be a Wise Person, Not a Smart Person
    28. 28. Live Leadership Take Time to Recognize when You Exemplify One, or More, of the Leadership Qualities Put Yourself In Situations that Force You to be a Leader Be a Wise Person, Not a Smart Person Find Good & Bad Mentors
    29. 29. Leadership Roles & Effective Leadership Models
    30. 30. Business/Work, Political and Military Leaders
    31. 31. Business/Work, Political and Military Leaders Employees Entrepreneurs, Founders, Co-Founders Corporate Executives Managers, Supervisors, and Team Leaders Soldiers, Sailors, and Airmen Non-Commissioned Officers & Officers Politicians i.e. Senators, Governors
    32. 32. Leadership Character Model The Leadership Character Model was developed by the Turknett Leadership Group in 1995. They surmise that character necessary for leadership can be visualized as a scale, where integrity is the strong and solid base, and respect and responsibility are balanced on either side.
    33. 33. Leadership Character Model The Leadership Character Model was developed by the Turknett Leadership Group in 1995. They surmise that character necessary for leadership can be visualized as a scale, where integrity is the strong and solid base, and respect and responsibility are balanced on either side. Responsibility Respect Integrity
    34. 34. Integrity: honest, trustworthy and authentic
    35. 35. Integrity: honest, trustworthy and authentic Respect
    36. 36. Integrity: honest, trustworthy and authentic Respect Empathy
    37. 37. Integrity: honest, trustworthy and authentic Respect Empathy Emotional Mastery
    38. 38. Integrity: honest, trustworthy and authentic Respect Empathy Emotional Mastery Own the Blame
    39. 39. Integrity: honest, trustworthy and authentic Respect Empathy Emotional Mastery Own the Blame Humility
    40. 40. Integrity: honest, trustworthy and authentic Respect Responsibility Empathy Emotional Mastery Own the Blame Humility
    41. 41. Integrity: honest, trustworthy and authentic Respect Responsibility Empathy Accountability Emotional Mastery Own the Blame Humility
    42. 42. Integrity: honest, trustworthy and authentic Respect Responsibility Empathy Accountability Emotional Courage Mastery Own the Blame Humility
    43. 43. Integrity: honest, trustworthy and authentic Respect Responsibility Empathy Accountability Emotional Courage Mastery Self Confidence Own the Blame Humility
    44. 44. Integrity: honest, trustworthy and authentic Respect Responsibility Empathy Accountability Emotional Courage Mastery Self Confidence Own the Blame Focus on the Whole Humility
    45. 45. Social, Citizen, and Community Leaders
    46. 46. Social, Citizen, and Community Leaders Anyone who lives in the U.S. Voters Political Activists Social Activists Volunteers Philanthropists Teachers, Coaches, and Nurses
    47. 47. Social Change Model Leadership is viewed as a process rather than as a position. • The model explicitly promotes the values of equity, social justice, self- knowledge, personal empowerment, collaboration, citizenship, and service. • Service provides a powerful vehicle for developing leadership capabilities in a collaborative environment. Learning happens by quot;making meaningquot; of life experiences. • The model has two primary goals: 1. To enhance learning and development; more specifically, to develop greater: - Self-knowledge: understanding of one’s talents, values, interests, especially as these relate to the student’s capacity to provide effective leadership. - Leadership Competence: the capacity to mobilize oneself and others to serve and work collaboratively. 2. To facilitate positive social change at the institution or in the community. That is, to undertake actions which will help the institution/community to function more effectively and humanely.
    48. 48. The Seven C’s
    49. 49. The Seven C’s 1. Consciousness of self and others through self reflection means being aware of the values, emotions, attitudes, and beliefs that motivate one to take action.
    50. 50. The Seven C’s 1. Consciousness of self and others through self reflection means being aware of the values, emotions, attitudes, and beliefs that motivate one to take action. 2. Congruency means thinking, feeling and behaving with consistency, genuineness, authenticity, and honesty toward others.
    51. 51. The Seven C’s 1. Consciousness of self and others through self reflection means being aware of the values, emotions, attitudes, and beliefs that motivate one to take action. 2. Congruency means thinking, feeling and behaving with consistency, genuineness, authenticity, and honesty toward others. 3. Commitment implies intensity and duration. It requires a significant involvement and investment of one’s self in the activity and its intended outcomes.
    52. 52. The Seven C’s 1. Consciousness of self and others through self reflection means being aware of the values, emotions, attitudes, and beliefs that motivate one to take action. 2. Congruency means thinking, feeling and behaving with consistency, genuineness, authenticity, and honesty toward others. 3. Commitment implies intensity and duration. It requires a significant involvement and investment of one’s self in the activity and its intended outcomes. 4. Collaboration is the primary means of empowering others and self through trust. Collaboration can occur when one has trust in the diversity of multiple talents and perspectives of the group members and the power of that diversity to generate creative solutions and actions.
    53. 53. The Seven C’s 1. Consciousness of self and others through self reflection means being aware of the values, emotions, attitudes, and beliefs that motivate one to take action. 2. Congruency means thinking, feeling and behaving with consistency, genuineness, authenticity, and honesty toward others. 3. Commitment implies intensity and duration. It requires a significant involvement and investment of one’s self in the activity and its intended outcomes. 4. Collaboration is the primary means of empowering others and self through trust. Collaboration can occur when one has trust in the diversity of multiple talents and perspectives of the group members and the power of that diversity to generate creative solutions and actions. 5. Common purpose is to work with shared aims and values. It implies the ability to engage in collective analysis of the issues at hand and the tasks to be undertaken.
    54. 54. The Seven C’s 1. Consciousness of self and others through self reflection means being aware of the values, emotions, attitudes, and beliefs that motivate one to take action. 2. Congruency means thinking, feeling and behaving with consistency, genuineness, authenticity, and honesty toward others. 3. Commitment implies intensity and duration. It requires a significant involvement and investment of one’s self in the activity and its intended outcomes. 4. Collaboration is the primary means of empowering others and self through trust. Collaboration can occur when one has trust in the diversity of multiple talents and perspectives of the group members and the power of that diversity to generate creative solutions and actions. 5. Common purpose is to work with shared aims and values. It implies the ability to engage in collective analysis of the issues at hand and the tasks to be undertaken. 6. Controversy with Civility recognizes two fundamental realities of any group effort: that differences in viewpoint are inevitable and valuable, and that such differences must be aired openly but with civility.
    55. 55. The Seven C’s 1. Consciousness of self and others through self reflection means being aware of the values, emotions, attitudes, and beliefs that motivate one to take action. 2. Congruency means thinking, feeling and behaving with consistency, genuineness, authenticity, and honesty toward others. 3. Commitment implies intensity and duration. It requires a significant involvement and investment of one’s self in the activity and its intended outcomes. 4. Collaboration is the primary means of empowering others and self through trust. Collaboration can occur when one has trust in the diversity of multiple talents and perspectives of the group members and the power of that diversity to generate creative solutions and actions. 5. Common purpose is to work with shared aims and values. It implies the ability to engage in collective analysis of the issues at hand and the tasks to be undertaken. 6. Controversy with Civility recognizes two fundamental realities of any group effort: that differences in viewpoint are inevitable and valuable, and that such differences must be aired openly but with civility. 7. Citizenship describes the process whereby the self is responsibly connected to the environment and the community. It acknowledges the interdependence of all involved in the leadership effort. Citizenship thus recognizes that effective democracy involves individual responsibility as well as individual rights.
    56. 56. Personal, Family, and Clique Leaders YOU (Everyone)
    57. 57. The Whole Brain Model
    58. 58. The Whole Brain Model The Whole Brain Model is a mental model developed by Nedd Herrmann that describes the thinking preferences. These are the ways of thinking that satisfy us the most and seem natural for us. These ways of thinking change, often as a result of emotional experiences, life transitions, and other important insights. Thinking patterns describe the patterns of what we do and don’t prefer to pay attention to.
    59. 59. The Whole Brain Model The Whole Brain Model is a mental model developed by Nedd Herrmann that describes the thinking preferences. These are the ways of thinking that satisfy us the most and seem natural for us. These ways of thinking change, often as a result of emotional experiences, life transitions, and other important insights. Thinking patterns describe the patterns of what we do and don’t prefer to pay attention to. There are Four Thinking Styles in the Whole Brain Model:
    60. 60. The Whole Brain Model The Whole Brain Model is a mental model developed by Nedd Herrmann that describes the thinking preferences. These are the ways of thinking that satisfy us the most and seem natural for us. These ways of thinking change, often as a result of emotional experiences, life transitions, and other important insights. Thinking patterns describe the patterns of what we do and don’t prefer to pay attention to. There are Four Thinking Styles in the Whole Brain Model: Logician: Analytical, Mathematical, Technical, and Problem Solving.
    61. 61. The Whole Brain Model The Whole Brain Model is a mental model developed by Nedd Herrmann that describes the thinking preferences. These are the ways of thinking that satisfy us the most and seem natural for us. These ways of thinking change, often as a result of emotional experiences, life transitions, and other important insights. Thinking patterns describe the patterns of what we do and don’t prefer to pay attention to. There are Four Thinking Styles in the Whole Brain Model: Logician: Analytical, Mathematical, Technical, and Problem Solving. Organizer: Controlled, Conservative, Planned, Organized, and Administrative.
    62. 62. The Whole Brain Model The Whole Brain Model is a mental model developed by Nedd Herrmann that describes the thinking preferences. These are the ways of thinking that satisfy us the most and seem natural for us. These ways of thinking change, often as a result of emotional experiences, life transitions, and other important insights. Thinking patterns describe the patterns of what we do and don’t prefer to pay attention to. There are Four Thinking Styles in the Whole Brain Model: Logician: Analytical, Mathematical, Technical, and Problem Solving. Organizer: Controlled, Conservative, Planned, Organized, and Administrative. Communicator: Interpersonal, Emotional, Musical, Spiritual, and Talkative.
    63. 63. The Whole Brain Model The Whole Brain Model is a mental model developed by Nedd Herrmann that describes the thinking preferences. These are the ways of thinking that satisfy us the most and seem natural for us. These ways of thinking change, often as a result of emotional experiences, life transitions, and other important insights. Thinking patterns describe the patterns of what we do and don’t prefer to pay attention to. There are Four Thinking Styles in the Whole Brain Model: Logician: Analytical, Mathematical, Technical, and Problem Solving. Organizer: Controlled, Conservative, Planned, Organized, and Administrative. Communicator: Interpersonal, Emotional, Musical, Spiritual, and Talkative. Visionary: Imaginative, Synthesizing, Artistic, Holistic, and Conceptual.
    64. 64. Whole Brain Model
    65. 65. Questions...

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