Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Sortition in the History of Democracy

210 views

Published on

My presentation at the Devcon5 conference in Osaka. A conceptual and historical account of the use of random selection in the history of democracy.

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Sortition in the History of Democracy

  1. 1. Sortition in the History of Democracy Federico Ast
  2. 2. Is rationality always desirable in decision-making?
  3. 3. Pool of Options Option Chosen The Blind Break Break
  4. 4. A lottery decision is a(n) ...decision impartial amoral alogical non-discriminating unemotional non-prejudiced non-thinking arational unpredictable non-creative non-wilful non-passionate un-ambitious non-calculating etc ...
  5. 5. The Lottery Principle “Decision-making by lottery is justified whenever it is important that bad reasons be kept out of the decision.”
  6. 6. Voting Decision based on reasons (good and bad)
  7. 7. Lottery Decision not based on reasons (good and bad)
  8. 8. “History never repeats itself, but it rhymes” Mark Twain
  9. 9. Ancient Athens: Sortition in the World's First Democracy
  10. 10. Cleisthenes The Father of Democracy (a.k.a. “the Ancient Satoshi Nakamoto”) 508 B.C.
  11. 11. Citizens Citizens Assembly CouncilCourts Magistrates 500 selected by lot6000 selected by lot 600 selected by lot 100 elected by vote α β γ Δ δ λ λ Θ ε ψ π φ ρ λ λ γΩ Π Σ
  12. 12. 7000 100 99% 1%
  13. 13. The Council 500 citizens selected by lot rotating every year
  14. 14. Kleroterion
  15. 15. Power
  16. 16. Break
  17. 17. Rotation in the Council Year 1 Year 2 Year 3
  18. 18. Breaking Partisanship, Patronage and Collusion +
  19. 19. “Elections by Lot at Athens” Headlam, J.W.
  20. 20. “Democracy and Knowledge: Innovation and Learning in Classical Athens” Josiah Ober
  21. 21. Venice: Lotteries in an Aristocratic Republic
  22. 22. The Paradox of the Serenissima Repubblica
  23. 23. Power
  24. 24. Leonardo Loredan, Doge of Venice (1501 – 1521)
  25. 25. Consiglio Grande: Five Day Conclave
  26. 26. Great Council 30 Members
  27. 27. 30 Members 9 Members
  28. 28. 9 Members 40 Members Nominate 40 people by at least 7 votes a piece
  29. 29. 40 Members 12 Members
  30. 30. Nominate 25 people by at least 7 votes a piece 12 Members 25 Members
  31. 31. 25 Members 9 Members
  32. 32. 9 Members 45 Members Nominate 45 people by at least 7 votes a piece
  33. 33. 45 Members 11 Members
  34. 34. 11 Members 41 Members Nominate 41 people by at least 7 votes a piece
  35. 35. Elected by at least 25 votes 41 Members 1 Doge
  36. 36. “The office should seek the man” Venice Proverb
  37. 37. Break Making Politics an Unattractive Career
  38. 38. A Security Theater
  39. 39. The United States: Sortition in the First Representative Democracy
  40. 40. John Jay (1745-1829) James Madison (1745-1829) Alexander Hamilton (1757-1804) The Federalists
  41. 41. Thomas Paine (1737-1809) Common Sense (1776)
  42. 42. How to avoid a capture of the federal government by the elites of the powerful states?
  43. 43. 30 delegates from each colony to Congress
  44. 44. 13 Colonies 1 Colony
  45. 45. Elected by at least 25 votes 30 Members 1 President
  46. 46. Breaking Power Concentration +
  47. 47. The Decline of Sortition
  48. 48. Luck as abdication of individual responsibility
  49. 49. The fall of the classical ideal of a republic
  50. 50. The Revival of Lotteries in Late Stage Democracy
  51. 51. The Kleroterians Hélène Landemore Peter Stone John Burnheim James Fishkin
  52. 52. Deliberative Mini-Publics
  53. 53. 150 randomly drawn French citizens to create new climate policy
  54. 54. Building the Institutions for the Decentralized Internet
  55. 55. When Should Lotteries Be Used? Possibility of good reasons No possibility of good reasons Possibility of bad reasons No possibility of bad reasons
  56. 56. “The Luck of the Draw” Peter Stone
  57. 57. “The Political Potential of Sortition” Oliver Dowlen
  58. 58. Sortition in the History of Democracy Federico Ast

×