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Evidence based reading practices.cr4 yr,jan18, 2013

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Slides from the CR4YR session in Richmond, Jan. 18, 2013 - PIRLS and Hiebert/Pearson research

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Evidence based reading practices.cr4 yr,jan18, 2013

  1. 1. Making a Difference in Reading: Evidence-Based Practices  CHANGING  RESULTS  FOR  YOUNG   READERS  SYMPOSIUM   January  18,  2013   RICHMOND  HILTON  HOTEL   Faye  Brownlie    
  2. 2. Learning Intentions•  I  can  find  evidence  of  current  reading  research  in   my  prac6ce  •  I  have  polished  my  mental  model  of  what  is   effec6ve  teaching  of  reading  •  I  have  an  enhanced  idea  of  how  to  collaborate   with  another  educator  in  my  building  •  I  am  leaving  with  a  ques6on  and  a  plan  
  3. 3. •  Research •  Recall •  Rant •  Recharge•  Risk and rejoice
  4. 4. PIRLS, 2011 Progress in International Reading Literacy Study•  Grade  4,  every  5  years  •  2011  –  45  countries  •  2600  students  in  148  schools  in  BC  in  2011  •  BC  also  par6cipated  in  2006  •  Measures  trends  in  reading  achievement  •  Examines  policies  and  prac6ces  related  to  literacy  hKp://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/assessment/nat_int_pubspirls.htm  
  5. 5. PIRLS, 2011 Progress in International Reading Literacy Study  •  2  –  40  minute  sessions  •  Mul6ple-­‐choice  and  constructed  response  •  4  passages  –  2  fic6on;  2  non-­‐fic6on  •  Ques6onnaire  for  students,  teachers,   principals,  parents  –  to  beKer  understand  the   prac6ces  associated  with  reading  performance  
  6. 6. PIRLS, 2011 – BC Results Progress in International Reading Literacy Study  •  Mean  score  significantly  above  interna6onal   AND  Canadian  averages  •  No  change  from  2006  to  2011,  but  other   countries  did  increase  from  2006  •  15%  -­‐  Advanced  Benchmark;  55%  -­‐  High   Benchmark  (4  Interna6onal  Benchmarks)  •  Performed  beKer  in  literary  reading  than  in   informa6onal  reading  
  7. 7. PIRLS, 2011 – BC Results Progress in International Reading Literacy Study  •  Reported  high  levels  of  enjoyment  of  reading   and  self-­‐confidence  •  The  more  o_en  students  read  stories  or   novels,  the  beKer  they  tended  to  perform  in   reading  •  26%  of  students  reported  not  speaking  En/Fr   at  home.    No  difference  in  their  level  of   achievement!!!!  
  8. 8. PIRLS, 2011 – BC Results Progress in International Reading Literacy Study  •  Comprehension  Processes   –  retrieving  and  straighborward  inferencing   –  interpre6ng,  integra6ng,  and  evalua6ng   *Most  high  performing  countries,  including  BC,  did   beKer  on  the  laKer.    
  9. 9. What Happens to the Basics? – Elfrieda H. Hiebert & P David Pearson . Ed. Leadership, Dec/ Jan 2012/13•  Common  Core  primary  classrooms  are   characterized  by   –  Building  knowledge   –  Increasing  students’  responsibility  for  reading   (capacity  and  stamina)   –  Providing  more  6me  for  student  involvement  with   text  
  10. 10. What Happens to the Basics? – Elfrieda H. Hiebert & P David Pearson . Ed. Leadership, Dec/ Jan 2012/13•  NCLB  taught  us  that  a  simple  view  of  reading   instruc6on  –  in  which  skills  come  first  and   learning  from  text  comes  next  –  does  not   create  engaged  readers.  
  11. 11. What Happens to the Basics? – Elfrieda H. Hiebert & P David Pearson . Ed. Leadership, Dec/ Jan 2012/13•  As  schools  incorporate  Common  Core   standards  into  the  primary  grades,  teachers   and  students  will  experience  how  powerful   literacy  can  be  when  texts  are  not  only  used  to   teach  basic  skills,  but  also  viewed  as  a  source   of  knowledge.  
  12. 12. What Happens to the Basics? – Elfrieda H. Hiebert & P David Pearson . Ed. Leadership, Dec/ Jan 2012/13•  …since  NCLB,  6me  devoted  to  reading   instruc6on  in  many  schools  had  doubled,   whereas  6me  students  actually  spent  reading   text  had  increased  by  only  about  15%.  •  Brenner,  Hiebert,  and  Tompkins  (2009)  
  13. 13. What Happens to the Basics? – Elfrieda H. Hiebert & P David Pearson . Ed. Leadership, Dec/ Jan 2012/13•  To  aKain  this  automa6c  word  recogni6on,   most  2nd  graders  and  some  3rd  graders  need  a   substan6al  amount  of  reading  of  accessible   text  that  they  can  handle  without  much   teacher  scaffolding.  
  14. 14. The  struggling  reader,  no  maKer  what  grade  the   child  is  in,  has  not  built  an  efficient  reading   process  system  to  make  meaning  from  texts  or   help  him  or  her  solve  problems  when  stuck…  For  teachers,  that  means  learning  how  to  teach   in  support  of  the  child  as  he  or  she  gains  more   control  of  strategic  ac6ons.            -­‐Johnson  &  Keier  
  15. 15. What Happens to the Basics? – Elfrieda H. Hiebert & P David Pearson . Ed. Leadership, Dec/ Jan 2012/13•  …instruc6on  in  grades  2-­‐3  should  focus  on  the   goals  –  consolida6on  of  word  knowledge  and   the  use  of  text  to  acquire  world  knowledge  –   not  on  pushing  for  texts  that  have  par6cular   readability  levels.  
  16. 16. M  –  meaning  Does  this  make  sense?  S  –  language  structure  Does  this  sound  right?  V  –  visual  informa6on   Does  this  look  right?  
  17. 17. Language Cautions…•  Based  on  scien6fic  research  •  Scripted  skills  •  All  achieve  mastery  •  A  program  for  all  students  •  Either  a  teacher  or  a  paraprofessional  can   teach  this  
  18. 18. K – Building Connections/Response to Reading•  Prac6ce  making  connec6ons  •  Choose  a  symbol  •  Talk  about  how  this  helps  our  reading  •  Read  together  and  make  connec6ons  •  Students  show  their  connec6ons  by  drawing   and  wri6ng  •  with  Jessica  Chan,  Burnaby  
  19. 19. Timetables•  What  do  you  no6ce?  •  What  works  for  you  in  this  6metable?  •  What  would  you  adapt?  •  What  benefits  do  you  see  to  each?  
  20. 20. •  Choose  a  6metable  and  think  of  your  class  and   your  context.    When  would  you  most  like  to   have  support  join  you  in  the  class?      
  21. 21. Working Together•  Think  big,  start  small  •  Build  a  rela6onship  •  Celebrate  differences  •  Aim  for  consistency  

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