Differentiation. Prince George.2013

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Strategies for differentiating instruction to include all students. Intermediate/Secondary.

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Differentiation. Prince George.2013

  1. 1. DifferentiationPrince  George  Intermediate/Secondary  Teachers   Feb.  26,  2013   Faye  Brownlie   www.slideshare.net  
  2. 2. Differentiated Instruction…is  a  process  to  teaching  and  learning  for  students   of  different  abiliGes  in  the  same  class.  (NCAC  –  NaGonal  Centre  on  Accessing  the  General   Curriculum)  The  intent  is  to  maximize  each  student’s  growth  and   individual  success  by  meeGng  each  student   where  he  or  she  is...rather  than  expecGng   students  to  modify  themselves  for  the   curriculum.”  (Hall,  2002)    
  3. 3. Differentiated InstructionContent  Process  Product  Learning  environment  
  4. 4. Differentiated InstructionAn  approach  to  teaching  and  learning  that  gives   students  mulGple  opGons:  -­‐  for  taking  in  informaGon  -­‐  for  making  sense  of  ideas  -­‐  for  presenGng  ideas  -­‐  for  being  evaluated  on  their  learning  
  5. 5. Some Key Understandings:•  Access  to  the  content  •  Present  learning  goals,  learning  intenGons  •  Focus  on  concepts  and  principles  •  Use  flexible  groups  •  Use  on-­‐going  assessment  (assessment  FOR   learning)  
  6. 6. How is this differentiation?–  MulGple  opGons  in  –  Access  to  the  curriculum  –  OpportuniGes  for  learning  –  MeeGng  students  where  they  are  –  Content,  process,  product,  learning  environment  
  7. 7. The teeter totter kids curriculumkids
  8. 8. FrameworksIt’s All about Thinking (English, Humanities, Social Studies) – Brownlie & Schnellert, 2009It’s All about Thinking (Math, Science)– Brownlie, Fullerton, Schnellert, 2011
  9. 9. Universal Design for LearningMulGple  means:  -­‐to  tap  into  background  knowledge,  to  acGvate   prior  knowledge,  to  increase  engagement  and   moGvaGon  -­‐to  acquire  the  informaGon  and  knowledge  to   process  new  ideas  and  informaGon  -­‐to  express  what  they  know.                        Rose  &  Meyer,  2002  
  10. 10. Backwards Design•  What  important  ideas  and  enduring   understandings  do  you  want  the  students  to   know?  •  What  thinking  strategies  will  students  need  to   demonstrate  these  understandings?                      McTighe  &  Wiggins,  2001  
  11. 11. Teaching Approach that Differentiate•  Open-­‐ended  teaching  •  Strategies:    connect,  process,  transform  &    personalize  •  Workshop  •  Choice  •  Inquiry  learning  •  Literature/informaGon  circles  
  12. 12. Differentiated Instruction How  can  you  find  the  sum  of:   6  +  8   36  +  48                                  3.6  +  4.8  
  13. 13. Introduction to Mitosis•  Whip  around  –  what  do  you  remember  about   DNA?  •  QuesGoning  from  3  pictures  •  AnGcipaGon  guide  –  with  partner  •  Read  to  find  out  and  provide  evidence  for  your   answer    •  Sort  and  predict  –  groups  of  3  •  With  Ken  Asano,  Centennial  
  14. 14. Before                      Aher  
  15. 15. cancer        duplicate  cell  cycle      daughter  cells  cytokinesis      nucleus  interphase      proteins  mitosis        divide  replicaGon      replace  spindle  fibres    funcGon  for  survival  separate  
  16. 16. Thermal Energy/Plate Tectonics•  Sort  and  predict  with  vocab  •  Utube  clip  –  resort  your  words  as  needed  •  Scan  the  text  for  what  else  you  need  to  know  •  Use  the  words  to  make  a  concept  map  •  Exit  slip:    how  will  you  best  remember  •  With  Curt  Dewolff,  Moody  Secondary  
  17. 17. How is this differentiation?–  MulGple  opGons  in  –  Access  to  the  curriculum  –  OpportuniGes  for  learning  –  MeeGng  students  where  they  are  –  Content,  process,  product,  learning  environment  
  18. 18. Information Circles•  Choose  your  inquiry  quesGon  or  informaGon   focus  •  Model  how  to  ask  quesGons  from  an  image,   within  the  framework  of  the  quesGon  •  Fishbowl  a  circle  conversaGon  •  Other  students  observe  for  ‘what  works’  •  Build  criteria  for  effecGve  group  behaviour  
  19. 19. Vocabulary/terms   Images  Ques3ons   Key  ideas  
  20. 20. The  10  Greatest  Canadian  Environmentalists  –  Discovery  Series,  ScholasGc  
  21. 21. What  worked?  •  Eye  contact  •  On  topic  –  everyone  said  something  •  No  interrupGons  •  Everyone  spoke  •  Prepared    •  No  physical  distracGons  •  Direct  responses  –  acknowledge  and  linked  in  •  Laughing  and  then  return  to  task  •  Took  turns,  equally  •  Nodding,  watching  as  they  listened  
  22. 22. Information Circles•  Select  4-­‐5  different  arGcles,  focused  on  central  topic  or   theme.  •  Present  arGcles  and  have  students  choose  the  one  they   wish  to  read.  •  Present  note-­‐taking  page.  •  Student  fill  in  all  boxes  EXCEPT  ‘key  ideas’  before   meeGng  in  the  group.  •  Students  meet  in  ‘like’  groups  and  discuss  their  arGcle,   deciding  together  on  ‘key  ideas’.  •  Students  meet  in  non-­‐alike  groups  and  present  their   informaGon  from  their  arGcle.  
  23. 23. Inquiry Circles on Mesopotamia•  Fishbowl  of  inquiry  circles   –  Read  to  find  what’s  important  and/or  interesGng  and   defend  with  2  pieces  of  evidence  -­‐  “because”  •  Co-­‐create  criteria  for  effecGve  group  •  Assign  students  to  topic  groups  •  Students  read  to  choose  ‘the  best  invenGon’  •  In  groups,  each  talks  by  supporGng  his/her   opinion  with  evidence  •  With  Sue  Jackson,  Minnekhada  
  24. 24. How is this differentiation?–  MulGple  opGons  in  –  Access  to  the  curriculum  –  OpportuniGes  for  learning  –  MeeGng  students  where  they  are  –  Content,  process,  product,  learning  environment  
  25. 25. •  10  years  aher  high  school,  graduates  who  had   honed  their  teamwork  skills  while  sGll  in  high   school  had  significantly  higher  earnings  than   those  who  failed  to  do  so  (Science  Daily  2008).  
  26. 26. Inquiry based teaching …•  Is  problem  or  quesGon  driven  •  Encourages  collaboraGon  •  Makes  students  into  explorers  and  discoverers  •  Requires  students  to  think  •  Puts  teachers  in  nonconvenGonal  roles   –  Steph  Harvey  and  Harvey  Daniels,  2009  
  27. 27. Inquiry based teaching …•  Requires  explicit  teaching  of  social  skills  and   comprehension  skills  •  Is  open-­‐ended  •  Is  inclusive  •  Can  permeate  a  day  •  Is  fun  
  28. 28. What? So What?•  2  column  notes  •  EssenGal  quesGon:   –  How  does  where  you  live  affect  how  you  live?  
  29. 29. A  Midsummer  Night’s  Dream  –   Introduc7on  assignment  •  Partner  draw    •  Step  one:  Choose  a  partner.    One  partner  (partner  #1)  will   be  drawing,  the  other  (partner  #2)  will  be  describing  an   image  on  the  screen  to  the  partner  who  is  drawing.    Partner   1  must  turn  their  desk  toward  the  back  wall  so  that  their   back  is  facing  the  Smart  Board  at  the  front  –  they  cannot   see  the  picture  they  are  about  to  draw.    Once  the  picture  is   up,  partner  two  will  describe  the  image  to  partner  1  as   (s)he  draws  it.    Both  partners  should  be  able  to  see  the   drawing  as  it  is  being  created.    Once  finished,  students  may   turn  around  and  compare  their  drawings  to  the  original.          
  30. 30. Step  two:      Switch  partners  and  repeat  the  above  process  with  the  picture  below:  
  31. 31. Step  three:  “What/So  What”  Have  students  work  again  with  their  picture  partner.    They  need  to  make  a  two  column  table  labeling  the  columns:  “What”  and  “So  What?”  In  the  “What”  column,  students  will  make  observaGons  on  what  they  noGce  about  the  picture.    In  the  “So  What”  column,  students  will  explain  why  each  observaGon  is  important,  what  it  might  mean,  significance,  and  so  on.  
  32. 32. Class  discussion  following  partner  work:  What:   So  What:  What  do  you  see  in  the   What  might  the  significance  of  the  image  be?  image  above?  A  garden   Gardens  are  safe  –  this  is  probably  a  safe  place  There  is  a  mask  behind  the   Maybe  this  is  not  a  safe  place;  girl   Is  he  a  stalker?   Maybe  this  is  a  forbidden  love?  (spying?)  The  girl  has  flowers  in  her   Maybe  he  picked  flowers  for  her  hair   She  might  be  a  fairy  The  man  is  part  donkey   Maybe  he  had  a  curse  put  on  him?  (he  has  donkey  ears  and  a   Is  this  a  magical  place  –  it  reminds  (me)  of  Narnia  hairy  face)   Magic  must  be  involved   Maybe  it  has  to  do  with  his  artude  –  “ass”  The  two  are  looking  lovingly   They  must  be  in  love  at  each  other   Maybe  it  is  a  forbidden  love?   It  is  weird  that  she  loves  him  because  he  is  part  donkey   Maybe  she  is  under  a  love  curse  
  33. 33. How is this differentiation?–  MulGple  opGons  in  –  Access  to  the  curriculum  –  OpportuniGes  for  learning  –  MeeGng  students  where  they  are  –  Content,  process,  product,  learning  environment  
  34. 34. Erica  Foote,    Princess  Margaret  Secondary  •  If  students  were  given  the  opportunity  (4   Gmes  per  semester)  to  show  what  they  know   in  different  ways,  would  it  not  only  increase   their  interest  and  effort  but  also  increase  their   understanding?    
  35. 35. English  10  •  4  wriGng  assignments,  4  choice  assignments   –  PowerPoint  presentaGons,  drawing,  poetry,  collages,   creaGng  their  own  test  with  answer  keys,  presenGng   their  informaGon  orally  or  using  drama  to  represent   their  thinking    •  6  students    •  AFL  strategies   –  Ranked  exemplars  with  the  PS   –  Analyzed  the  exemplars  to  co-­‐create  criteria   –  Used  the  criteria  for  their  work   –  Ownership  –  with  choice  
  36. 36. 2  wriGng  2  choice  assignments  –     demonstrate  your  knowledge  &   understanding  of  various  literature   Not  yet   Approaching   Mee3ng   Exceeding   %/#  WriGng   16/2   41/5   25/3   16/2  (essay/paragraph)  Choice   0/0   16/2   33/4   50/6  
  37. 37. Erica’s  ReflecGons  •  100%  of  students  reported  they  liked  the  choice   and  wanted  to  do  have  choices  again  in  another   semester  •  91%  of  students  felt  they  did  beter  with  choice  •  About  50%  sGll  chose  some  form  of  wriGng  when   given  a  choice,  but  liked  the  choice  •  Fewer  complained  about  the  non-­‐choice  wriGng   assignments  •  Fewer  assignments  were  handed  in  late  

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