BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011

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BEST Richmond, Feb. 2011

  1. 1. Building  Elementary  Secondary   Teams  2010-­‐2011,   a  facilitated  conversa<on   Richmond   February  16th,  2011   Faye  Brownlie  
  2. 2. Learning  Inten<ons  •  I  have  a  beEer  understanding  of  how  to  use   Universal  Design  for  Learning  and  Backwards   Design  to  guide  my  teaching.  •  I  have  determined  something  to  let  go  of  and   something  to  do  more  of.  •  I  know  ‘what  counts’  in  my  teaching.  •  I  have  made  or  deepened  a  contact  with   someone  outside  my  school.  
  3. 3. How  the  world’  best  performing   school  systems  come  out  on  top  –   Sept.  2007,  McKinsey  &  Co.  1.  GeUng  the  right  people  to  become  teachers  2.  Developing  them  into  effec<ve  instructors  3.  Ensuring  that  the  system  is  able  to  deliver  the   best  possible  instruc<on  for  every  child  
  4. 4. McKinsey  Report,  2007  •  The  top-­‐performing  school  systems  recognize   that  the  only  way  to  improve  outcomes  is  to   improve  instruc<on:    learning  occurs  when   students  and  teachers  interact,  and  thus  to   improve  learning  implies  improving  the  quality   of  that  interac<on.  
  5. 5. •  Coaching  classroom  prac<ce  •  Moving  teacher  training  to  the  classroom  •  Developing  stronger  school  leaders  •  Enabling  teachers  to  learn  from  each  other  
  6. 6. Individual  teachers:  •  Become  aware  of  areas  to  grow  in  their  prac<ce  •  Gain  an  understanding  of  best  prac<ce  –  most   effec<ve  when  demonstrated  in  an  authen<c   seUng  •  Are  mo<vated  to  improve   –  Teachers  have  high  expecta<ons   –  Share  a  common  purpose   –  Have  a  collec<ve  belief  in  their  ability  to  make  a   difference  
  7. 7. FrameworksIt’s All about Thinking – Brownlie & Schnellert, 2009
  8. 8. Universal Design for LearningMul<ple  means:  -­‐to  tap  into  background  knowledge,  to  ac<vate   prior  knowledge,  to  increase  engagement  and   mo<va<on  -­‐to  acquire  the  informa<on  and  knowledge  to   process  new  ideas  and  informa<on  -­‐to  express  what  they  know.                        Rose  &  Meyer,  2002  
  9. 9. Backwards Design•  What  important  ideas  and  enduring   understandings  do  you  want  the  students  to   know?  •  What  thinking  strategies  will  students  need  to   demonstrate  these  understandings?                      McTighe  &  Wiggins,  2001  
  10. 10. Approaches•  Assessment  for  learning  •  Open-­‐ended  strategies  •  Gradual  release  of  responsibility  •  Coopera<ve  learning  •  Literature  circles  and  informa<on  circles  •  Inquiry  It’s All about Thinking – Brownlie & Schnellert, 2009
  11. 11. Essential Lesson Components•  Essen<al  ques<on/learning  inten<on/a  big  idea  •  Open-­‐ended  strategies:    connect-­‐process-­‐transform  •  Differen<a<on  –  choice,  choice,  choice  •  Assessment  for  learning  •  Gradual  release  of  responsibility  
  12. 12. Assessment for Learning•  Learning  inten<ons  •  Criteria  •  Descrip<ve  feedback  •  Ques<oning  •  Peer  and  self  assessment  •  Ownership  
  13. 13. Grade 9 Science – Starleigh Grass & Mindy Casselman Electricity•  The  Challenge:  •  Many  of  the  students  are  disengaged  and  dislike   ‘book  learning’.    They  acquire  more  knowledge,   concept  and  skill  when  they  are  ac<ve,   collabora<ve  and  reading  in  chunks.  •  Starleigh  and  Mindy  in  It’s  All  about  Thinking  (Math  and  Science)-­‐  Brownlie,   Fullerton,  Schnellert  in  press.  
  14. 14. Essential Question•  If  we  understand  how  materials  hold  and   transfer  electric  charge,  can  we  store  and   move  electric  charge  using  common   materials?    
  15. 15. •  Individually,  brainstorm  what  you  can  recall   about  the  characteris<cs  of  an  atom.  •  Meet  in  groups  of  3  to  add  to  and  revise  your   list.  •  Compare  this  list  to  the  master  list.  •  …(word  deriva<ons,  label  an  atom…)  •  Exit  slip:    2  characteris<cs  you  want  to   remember  about  atoms.  
  16. 16. The  Atom  •  All  maEer  is  made  of  atoms.    •  Atoms  have  electrons,  neutrons,  and  protons.    Electrons   move,  protons  and  neutrons  do  not  move.  •  Atoms  have  nega<ve  and  posi<ve  charges.    •  Electrons  have  a  nega<ve  charge;  protons  have  a  posi<ve   charge.  •  Protons  and  neutrons  are  located  at  the  centre  of  the  atom,   in  the  nucleus.  •  Electrons  orbit  around  the  outside  of  the  nucleus,  in  energy   “shells.”  •  An  object  can  be  nega<vely  or  posi<vely  charged,   depending  on  the  ra<o  of  protons  and  neutrons.  
  17. 17. Model Guided practice Independent practice Independent application  Pearson  &  Gallagher  (1983)  

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