How
business
can
benefit
from

architects’
design
thinking
+
doing

For
architects,
design
thinking
involves
collabora3ng
with
clients
and

colleagues
to
develop
inspired
visions
and
be6er
p...
We
must
deliver
projects
within
a
deadline
and
a
budget.

This
requires
a
rigorous
and
reliable
design
process.



We
call
this
rigorous
crea3ve
process
“reliable
magic.”

Our
process
aims
to
work
with
human
nature,
rather
than

a?empt
t...
Here
are
10

   reliable
magic

prac3ces
that
can

    be
applied
to

 business
outside

     the
world
of

     architect...
1.


Design
with–not
for–your
cons3tuents.

Engage
in
dialogue
aimed
at
building

deep‐seated
understanding
so
that
people...
2.

          *
Iden3fy
shared
interests.

It’s
not
necessary
for
people
to
agree
on

all
aspects
of
the
project.
Instead,...
3.


Re‐frame
the
ques3on.

Most
iniKal
project
definiKons
aim
too

low
and
present
falsely
limiKng
either/or

choices.




4.


Don’t
jump
to
the
end
of
the
story.

Jumping
to
conclusions
and
short‐

circuiKng
a
shared
learning
curve
leads

to
w...
5.


Invite
divergent
thinking.

Avoid
self‐limiKng
choices
between
exisKng

opKons
by
exploring
fast,
cheap
iteraKons

in...
6.


Learn
to
appreciate
uncertainty.

Allow
ideas
to
emerge
in
a
natural

process
of
dialogue
and
inquiry,
rather

than
d...
7.

Ask:
what
else
can
we
see
here?

Rather
than
re‐arrange
exisKng
pieces
of

a
puzzle,
look
beyond
obvious,
linear

solu...
8.

Don’t
get
too
a6ached,
too
soon.

Avoid
emoKonal
a?achments
to
early


ideas–especially
ones
that
are
developed

while...
9.

Expect
some
resistance.

It
is
a
given
that
new
ideas
will
be
adopted

a
different
rates
by
different
people.
Aim
to

wo...
10.

Adop3ng
ideas
is
a
process,
not
an
event.

The
digesKon
process
for
new
ideas
can
be

seen
as
similar
to
digesKng
foo...
A
BUSINESS
PROCESS
FOR






                       Farrow
Partnership
Architects

                                   Toro...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Reliable Magic: How business can benefit from architects' design thinking + doing

1,902 views

Published on

Farrow Partnership Architects identifies 10 design thinking + doing practices that can be applied to business.

Published in: Business, Design
0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,902
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
405
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
35
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Reliable Magic: How business can benefit from architects' design thinking + doing

  1. 1. How
business
can
benefit
from
 architects’
design
thinking
+
doing

  2. 2. For
architects,
design
thinking
involves
collabora3ng
with
clients
and
 colleagues
to
develop
inspired
visions
and
be6er
planning
solu3ons.


  3. 3. We
must
deliver
projects
within
a
deadline
and
a
budget.
 This
requires
a
rigorous
and
reliable
design
process.



  4. 4. We
call
this
rigorous
crea3ve
process
“reliable
magic.”
 Our
process
aims
to
work
with
human
nature,
rather
than
 a?empt
to
overcome
it.





  5. 5. Here
are
10
 reliable
magic
 prac3ces
that
can
 be
applied
to
 business
outside
 the
world
of
 architecture.


  6. 6. 1.
 Design
with–not
for–your
cons3tuents.
 Engage
in
dialogue
aimed
at
building
 deep‐seated
understanding
so
that
people

 “believe
in”
rather
than
“buy
in.”






  7. 7. 2.
 * Iden3fy
shared
interests.
 It’s
not
necessary
for
people
to
agree
on
 all
aspects
of
the
project.
Instead,
jointly
 define
points
of
common
interest
for
 moving
forward.




  8. 8. 3.
 Re‐frame
the
ques3on.
 Most
iniKal
project
definiKons
aim
too
 low
and
present
falsely
limiKng
either/or
 choices.




  9. 9. 4.
 Don’t
jump
to
the
end
of
the
story.
 Jumping
to
conclusions
and
short‐
 circuiKng
a
shared
learning
curve
leads
 to
weak
answers
and
shaky
support.




  10. 10. 5.
 Invite
divergent
thinking.
 Avoid
self‐limiKng
choices
between
exisKng
 opKons
by
exploring
fast,
cheap
iteraKons
 in
a
fluid
learn/adjust/repeat
process.




  11. 11. 6.
 Learn
to
appreciate
uncertainty.
 Allow
ideas
to
emerge
in
a
natural
 process
of
dialogue
and
inquiry,
rather
 than
defend
pre‐conceived
soluKons.






  12. 12. 7.
 Ask:
what
else
can
we
see
here?
 Rather
than
re‐arrange
exisKng
pieces
of
 a
puzzle,
look
beyond
obvious,
linear
 soluKons
to
see
pa?erns,
variaKons,
 combinaKons
and
deviaKons.







  13. 13. 8.
 Don’t
get
too
a6ached,
too
soon.
 Avoid
emoKonal
a?achments
to
early

 ideas–especially
ones
that
are
developed
 while
working
alone.
Instead,
set
these
 ideas
free
to
evolve
through
a
process
of
 dialogue
and
inquiry.






  14. 14. 9.
 Expect
some
resistance.
 It
is
a
given
that
new
ideas
will
be
adopted
 a
different
rates
by
different
people.
Aim
to
 work
through
natural
resistance
with
 dialogue
and
inquiry
rather
than
a?empt
to
 overcome
it.







  15. 15. 10.
 Adop3ng
ideas
is
a
process,
not
an
event.
 The
digesKon
process
for
new
ideas
can
be
 seen
as
similar
to
digesKng
food:
it’s
be?er
to
 create
an
appeKte
for
bite‐sized
pieces
than
 force‐feed
in
quanKty.

  16. 16. A
BUSINESS
PROCESS
FOR


 Farrow
Partnership
Architects
 Toronto,
Canada

 www.farrowpartnership.com


×