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  • This is the introduction slide. Note that this is a cooperative effort between Extension and Ag Science Teachers.
  • This slide has the two-fold mission of Quality Counts.
  • The next 3 slides discuss the main objectives of Quality Counts.
  • The next two slides talk about the 8 Core Concepts that should be gained from the program. Soft Skills
  • Hard Skills (science related)
  • This slide starts the section on the first concept.
  • This slide gives the total number of livestock projects exhibited in Texas in 2000. 71000 Shown in county shows in Texas in 2000
  • Purdue: 1% of all red meat entering the food chain are show animals
  • Read from slide
  • This slide starts the section about the second core concept.
  • The next two slides talk about the 8 Core Concepts that should be gained from the program. Soft Skills
  • This slide introduces next core concept.
  • After this slide, note that there are many similarities between the two organizations creeds, mottos, and pledges.
  • The next two slides talk about the 8 Core Concepts that should be gained from the program. Soft Skills
  • These are not the only skills. Encourage the participants to think of more skills. Break into pairs and have each team brainstorm The ways these skills are learned.
  • The next two slides talk about the 8 Core Concepts that should be gained from the program. Soft Skills
  • -Ask what Success is. Read Definition -Remind the participants that just because you win, you are not successful
  • -Ask what the participants think is failure -read definition Explain that just because you don’t win, that doesn’t mean that you failed
  • -Read to group -Ask for other characteristics Think of the most successful person you know…..
  • -Read to group -Ask for any other characteristics
  • The next two slides talk about the 8 Core Concepts that should be gained from the program. Soft Skills
  • Hard Skills (science related)
  • Introduce next concept
  • Hard Skills (science related)
  • Introduce next concept
  • Ask what potential hazards can occur
  • Hard Skills (science related)
  • Introduce core concept
  • Use maze craze to discuss communication
  • Hard Skills (science related)
  • Introduce next topic
  • -Close out the training session
  • -Reiterate the 8 Core Concepts
  • Kansas09

    1. 1. A Kansas Curriculum for Livestock Education Training Slides
    2. 2. Curriculum Focus <ul><li>Quality Assurance </li></ul><ul><li>Character Education </li></ul>
    3. 3. Objective 1 <ul><li>Enhance Character Education for Kansas </li></ul><ul><li>4-H and FFA Youth </li></ul>
    4. 4. Objective 2 <ul><li>Ensure all 4-H and FFA livestock projects meet all food quality standards </li></ul>
    5. 5. Objective 3 <ul><li>Promote a Positive Image of Youth Livestock Programs </li></ul>
    6. 6. Eight Core Concepts <ul><li>Character Education </li></ul><ul><li>Six Pillars of Character </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose of 4-H/FFA </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose of Livestock Projects </li></ul><ul><li>Making Decisions/Goal Setting </li></ul>
    7. 7. Eight Core Concepts <ul><li>Quality Assurance </li></ul><ul><li>Impact of Livestock Projects on Red Meat Industry </li></ul><ul><li>Responsibilities of Producing a Safe Product </li></ul><ul><li>Medication use/Reading and Following Labels </li></ul><ul><li>Animal Care and Well-Being </li></ul>
    8. 8. Core Concept <ul><li>Impact of Livestock Projects on Red Meat Industry </li></ul>
    9. 9. <ul><li>Reveal impact of ?????? market projects </li></ul>
    10. 10. How many pounds of carcass are there? <ul><li>Terms & Calculations : (1) Live Weight, (2) Dressing Percent, and (3) Carcass Weight </li></ul>
    11. 11. Total Entry Numbers <ul><li>Market Swine: 34,126 </li></ul><ul><li>Meat Goats: 17,651 </li></ul><ul><li>Market Lamb: 11,837 </li></ul><ul><li>Market Steers: 7,582 </li></ul><ul><li>TOTAL: 71,196 </li></ul>
    12. 12. Grand Total Grand Total: 16,780,325.8 pounds of carcass!!!!!! Link to 2006 Data
    13. 13. What does this mean? <ul><li>Livestock projects can IMPACT thousands of people!!! </li></ul><ul><li>Think about the CONSUMER!!!! </li></ul><ul><li>You never know who they might be…….. </li></ul>
    14. 14. Core Concept <ul><li>Six Pillars of Character </li></ul>
    15. 15. Six Pillars of Character <ul><li>Trustworthiness </li></ul><ul><li>Respect </li></ul><ul><li>Responsibility </li></ul><ul><li>Fairness </li></ul><ul><li>Caring </li></ul><ul><li>Citizenship </li></ul>
    16. 16. Eight Core Concepts <ul><li>Character Education </li></ul><ul><li>Six Pillars of Character </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose of 4-H/FFA </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose of Livestock Projects </li></ul><ul><li>Making Decisions/Goal Setting </li></ul>
    17. 17. Core Concept <ul><li>Purpose of 4-H/FFA </li></ul>
    18. 18. Motto <ul><li>Learning to Do </li></ul><ul><li>Doing to Learn </li></ul><ul><li>Earning to Live </li></ul><ul><li>Living to Serve </li></ul>
    19. 19. 4-H Slogan <ul><li>Learn by Doing </li></ul>
    20. 20. Eight Core Concepts <ul><li>Character Education </li></ul><ul><li>Six Pillars of Character </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose of 4-H/FFA </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose of Livestock Projects </li></ul><ul><li>Making Decisions/Goal Setting </li></ul>
    21. 21. Core Concept <ul><li>Purpose of Livestock Projects </li></ul>
    22. 22. Skills Gained by Exhibiting Livestock <ul><li>Problem Solving </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge of Livestock Industry </li></ul><ul><li>Self-Confidence </li></ul><ul><li>Team Work </li></ul><ul><li>Self-Motivation </li></ul><ul><li>Self-Discipline </li></ul><ul><li>Organizational Skills </li></ul><ul><li>Character </li></ul><ul><li>Social Skills </li></ul><ul><li>Competition </li></ul>
    23. 23. Eight Core Concepts <ul><li>Character Education </li></ul><ul><li>Six Pillars of Character </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose of 4-H/FFA </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose of Livestock Projects </li></ul><ul><li>Making Decisions/Goal Setting </li></ul>
    24. 24. Core Concept <ul><li>Decision Making </li></ul><ul><li>And </li></ul><ul><li>Goal Setting </li></ul>
    25. 25. What is Success? <ul><li>Success is the achievement of something desired, planned or attempted. </li></ul>
    26. 26. What is Failure? <ul><li>Failure is not achieving what you desire, plan or attempt. </li></ul>
    27. 27. Characteristics of Successful People <ul><li>Confident </li></ul><ul><li>Hard Working </li></ul><ul><li>Failure increases motivation to work harder </li></ul><ul><li>Challenging themselves </li></ul><ul><li>Take credit for success and take responsibility for failure </li></ul>
    28. 28. Characteristics of Unsuccessful People <ul><li>Doubt themselves and are anxious </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t work hard </li></ul><ul><li>Give up when things don’t go well </li></ul><ul><li>Just go through the motions without much participation </li></ul><ul><li>Believe someone else controls whether they succeed or fail </li></ul>
    29. 29. What is a Goal? <ul><li>Goal: something that one strives to achieve </li></ul>
    30. 30. Eight Core Concepts <ul><li>Character Education </li></ul><ul><li>Six Pillars of Character </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose of 4-H/FFA </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose of Livestock Projects </li></ul><ul><li>Making Decisions/Goal Setting </li></ul>
    31. 31. Eight Core Concepts <ul><li>Quality Assurance </li></ul><ul><li>Impact of Livestock Projects on Red Meat Industry </li></ul><ul><li>Responsibilities of Producing a Safe Product </li></ul><ul><li>Medication use/Reading and Following Labels </li></ul><ul><li>Animal Care and Well-Being </li></ul>
    32. 32. Core Concept <ul><li>Impact of Livestock Projects on the Red Meat Industry </li></ul>
    33. 33. Lesson #1 <ul><li>The Food Supply Continuum </li></ul>
    34. 34. Understand role and responsibility in the food supply continuum From: NPPC, Youth PQA; 2000
    35. 35. Understand role and responsibility in the food supply continuum <ul><li>ALL producers are affected by negative publicity concerning our food supply </li></ul><ul><li>Product safety can be compromised at any time in the food supply continuum </li></ul>Responsibility Citizenship
    36. 36. Eight Core Concepts <ul><li>Quality Assurance </li></ul><ul><li>Impact of Livestock Projects on Red Meat Industry </li></ul><ul><li>Responsibilities of Producing a Safe Product </li></ul><ul><li>Medication use/Reading and Following Labels </li></ul><ul><li>Animal Care and Well-Being </li></ul>
    37. 37. Core Concept <ul><li>Responsibility of Producing a Safe Product </li></ul>
    38. 38. Understand basic elements of food safety <ul><li>Past failures in food safety process </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recalls, scares, contamination </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points ( HACCP ) plans and monitoring now required by every packing plant, regardless of size - PREVENTION </li></ul>Responsibility Citizenship Trustworthiness
    39. 39. Understand basic elements of food safety <ul><li>Role of producer in providing packer with safe product </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ On-farm HACCP” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Certain hazards occur before product reaches packer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Notify packer of potential hazards </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Importance of record keeping </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Medication use and storage </li></ul></ul>Responsibility Citizenship Trustworthiness
    40. 40. Eight Core Concepts <ul><li>Quality Assurance </li></ul><ul><li>Impact of Livestock Projects on Red Meat Industry </li></ul><ul><li>Responsibilities of Producing a Safe Product </li></ul><ul><li>Medication use/Reading and Following Labels </li></ul><ul><li>Animal Care and Well-Being </li></ul>
    41. 41. Core Concept <ul><li>Medication Use/Reading and Following Labels </li></ul>
    42. 42. Exhibit knowledge of medication and feed labels and their meaning <ul><ul><li>Expiration date </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lot number </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dosage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Warnings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cautions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Application Method </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Precautions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Active Ingredient </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trade Name </li></ul></ul>Responsibility Caring Read the Labels!!! From: NPPC; PQA for Youth; 2000
    43. 43. Exhibit knowledge of medication and feed labels and their meaning <ul><li>Types of drug use </li></ul><ul><li>Labeled Use: Using the drug EXACTLY as it is specified on the label. Legal and the type of practice most producers use. </li></ul><ul><li>Off Label Use: The PRODUCER uses drugs on their own in a manner other than what is stated on the label without veterinarian guidance. ILLEGAL! </li></ul><ul><li>Extra Label Use: The VETERINARIAN prescribes a drug to be used in a manner other than what is on the label. LEAGAL and used when a good veterinarian-client-patient relationship exists </li></ul>From: NPPC; PQA for Youth; 2000
    44. 44. Exhibit knowledge of medication and feed labels and their meaning <ul><li>Labels must be followed when using feed and feed additives </li></ul><ul><li>Only a veterinarian can change the label of medications, including route of administration, dosage, duration, etc. (Extra label drug use) </li></ul><ul><li>NO ONE , not even a veterinarian, can legally change the label on feed or feed additives </li></ul>Responsibility Caring
    45. 45. Eight Core Concepts <ul><li>Quality Assurance </li></ul><ul><li>Impact of Livestock Projects on Red Meat Industry </li></ul><ul><li>Responsibilities of Producing a Safe Product </li></ul><ul><li>Medication use/Reading and Following Labels </li></ul><ul><li>Animal Care and Well-Being </li></ul>
    46. 46. Core Concept <ul><li>Animal Care and Well-Being </li></ul>
    47. 47. Animal Care and Well-Being <ul><li>Administering Medicines </li></ul><ul><li>Animal Facilities </li></ul><ul><li>Caring for your animals health </li></ul>
    48. 48. Knowledge of proper medication administration <ul><li>Proper routes of administration </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Differences in routes of administration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Differences between species </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ALWAYS avoid major meat cuts (loin, leg, ham)!!! </li></ul></ul>Responsibility Caring From: NPPC; PQA for Youth; 2000 From: SDSU Animal Science website <ul><ul><li>Ø </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ø </li></ul></ul>
    49. 49. Knowledge of proper medication administration <ul><li>Animals should NEVER be injected into the loin (back) or rump (ham or leg). </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Intramuscular injections (IM) should be given in the neck muscle </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Subcutaneous injections (Subcu) should be given in the fore or rear flank, under the skin </li></ul></ul>
    50. 50. Demonstrate knowledge of appropriate animal facilities - HOUSING <ul><li>Impact of decisions on the general welfare of the animal </li></ul>Caring Respect Shade Bedding Ventilation Shelter
    51. 51. Demonstrate knowledge of appropriate animal facilities - HANDLING <ul><li>Handle animals while temperatures are optimum </li></ul>Caring Respect Wet shavings Keep trailer moving to provide air flow Straw bedding Prevent drafts
    52. 52. Demonstrate knowledge of appropriate animal facilities - HANDLING <ul><li>Always handle animals calmly and gently </li></ul><ul><li>Provide water immediately after transport (and during if possible) </li></ul><ul><li>Provide shade while transporting </li></ul>Caring Respect
    53. 53. Demonstrate knowledge of appropriate animal facilities - HANDLING <ul><li>Never use electric prods, buzzers or slappers to handle animals </li></ul><ul><li>Use proper equipment (i.e. sorting panels for hogs) when handling, loading and transporting animals </li></ul>Caring Respect
    54. 54. Demonstrate an understanding of animal well-being <ul><li>Nutrition and feeding </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Meeting animal’s requirements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Management to reach optimum weight, not “feed and then withhold right before show” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Importance of a clean, fresh water supply at all times </li></ul>Responsibility Caring Citizenship
    55. 55. Demonstrate an understanding of animal well-being <ul><li>Water should NEVER be withheld from the animal for more than a few hours, especially as a means of shedding weight </li></ul><ul><li>Feed additives, including Paylean ® for swine, alter the metabolism of the animal </li></ul><ul><li>Feed additives may also affect the way that an animal handles stresses, including handling, loading, showing and weight management </li></ul>Responsibility Caring Citizenship
    56. 56. Evaluate herd health <ul><li>Animals should be observed daily for signs of illness </li></ul><ul><li>If an illness or injury occurs, animal should be treated promptly and correctly, following label directions and may need the care or advice of a veterinarian </li></ul>Responsibility Citizenship Caring
    57. 57. Evaluate herd health <ul><li>Many producers have strict biosecurity practices on their operations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Prevent spread of potential disease </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be aware of, and observe these practices when visiting farms </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Youth may want to consider adopting some simple biosecurity measures on their operation </li></ul>Responsibility Citizenship Caring
    58. 58. <ul><li>Putting a Bow on It……… </li></ul>
    59. 59. Eight Core Concepts <ul><li>Character Education </li></ul><ul><li>Six Pillars of Character </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose of 4-H/FFA </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose of Livestock Projects </li></ul><ul><li>Making Decisions/Goal Setting </li></ul>
    60. 60. Eight Core Concepts <ul><li>Quality Assurance </li></ul><ul><li>Impact of Livestock Projects on Red Meat Industry </li></ul><ul><li>Responsibilities of Producing a Safe Product </li></ul><ul><li>Medication use/Reading and Following Labels </li></ul><ul><li>Animal Care and Well-Being </li></ul>
    61. 61. Quality Counts for Everyone <ul><li>Quality Counts is for All Youth Livestock Programs in the state of Texas Kansas </li></ul>
    62. 62. Questions to Address <ul><li>Quality Counts Old Vs. New </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The pillars are still the pillars </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quality Assurance is still Quality Assurance </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Renewed focus on Animal Care </li></ul><ul><li>Training for trainer is good for 3 years </li></ul>
    63. 63. Questions to Address <ul><li>If I was trained in 2007 do I need to be trained again </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Not until 2010 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pork Board will send you notification of re-training needs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Training is available on-line </li></ul></ul>
    64. 64. Questions to Address <ul><li>How long will it take to conduct a Train-the-Trainer Event? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Face to Face 4 hours </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Online probably less </li></ul></ul>
    65. 65. Questions to Address <ul><li>Is there an online Train-the-Trainer option like Youth PQA Plus? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No…But Texas Trails Could get you a long way to that end </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use PQA Plus online certification to get yourself certified </li></ul></ul>
    66. 66. Questions to Address <ul><li>Can the students go to an interactive training site? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Yes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reports from the system will be difficult </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sorts will need to be made by zip code </li></ul></ul></ul>
    67. 67. Questions to Address <ul><li>Do they get a Quality Counts Number </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We do not use a Quality Counts Number </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>However each student in the online program gets a unique numeric identifier </li></ul></ul>
    68. 68. Questions to Address <ul><li>When teaching Quality Counts, what are considered the core modules needed </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The eight core concepts </li></ul></ul>
    69. 69. Questions to Address <ul><li>What is the difference between Tier 1 and Tier 2 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Uses the same base curricula but separates the teaching material into a two step process. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Could be thought of as Year 1 vs. Year 2 </li></ul></ul>

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