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A short status quo, from inside tech entrepreneurship 
Berlin, Septmber 17th
This presentation is written from the perspective of an 
entrepreneur, an advisor and angel investor to many 
young compan...
Assumptions
Innovation Through Entrepreneurship (ITE) 
The transformation of society and innovation in the 
digital industrialization ...
The verticalisation of the digital 
economy is changing: ITE in the future is not 
in social, hardware, or health tech alo...
Successful ITE is a question of scale: thousands of companies need to be created 
and most of them will fail in order for ...
S.W.O.T. 
On the ITE Ecosystem
Strength 
The cultural diversity of the European Union 
can positively impact building truly global 
companies. 
Entrepren...
Weakness 
The most apparent EU weakness is the 
lack of an integrated market. 
A successful European rollout of a 
product...
Opportunity 
A strong focus and support for early stage (scale!) 
and incentivizing cultural diversity as an 
opportunity ...
Threat 
The current privacy uproar in member states and a 
lack of understanding in the political sphere of the 
digital e...
ITE Ecosystem 
The three key contributors and their roles
Policy 
Policy can make or break the future of the ITE Ecosystem: creating a legal and social 
framework that not only sup...
Academia 
The academic world has the task to not only educate people in becoming 
Entrepreneurs, but also for Scientists t...
Entrepreneurs & Corporations 
Successful Entrepreneurs have to take the time for extensive exchange with policy 
makers, t...
Conclusion
If anything by 2020 we could hear investors globally say to Founders: “If you want to build a global 
company, start in Eu...
Further Readings & Publications
Policy Brief on the Startup Ecosystem from Germany 
A key finding of the group Forum Digitale Agenda is, that creating a r...
Policy Brief on Fostering a Startup Ecosystem by Up Global 
While supporting thousands of community leaders over the past ...
Study on german ecosystem by KPMG BvDS 
The study DSM has been published here: 
http://deutscherstartupmonitor.de/fileadmi...
Study on Berlin ecosystem by McKinsey 
The study „Berlin Gründet“ has been published here: 
http://www.mckinsey.de/berlin-...
Thank you. 
Contact simon@factoryberlin.com
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A Short Status Quo, From Inside Tech Entrepreneurship.

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A short status quo, from inside tech entrepreneurship by Simon Schaefer.

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A Short Status Quo, From Inside Tech Entrepreneurship.

  1. 1. A short status quo, from inside tech entrepreneurship Berlin, Septmber 17th
  2. 2. This presentation is written from the perspective of an entrepreneur, an advisor and angel investor to many young companies. One result of my experience is the Factory Campus in Berlin, in a very early stage Ecosystem, not only bringing together Startups at various stages, but also policy makers, academia and corporations to more directly develop innovative products. This diversity and interaction is designed to positively impact the local and eventually the European economy. www.Factoryberlin.com
  3. 3. Assumptions
  4. 4. Innovation Through Entrepreneurship (ITE) The transformation of society and innovation in the digital industrialization is largely driven by the consumer’s choice of products, and the immediate iteration through direct interaction with its creators. Innovation therefore is happening in an “open-heart-operation”: small and agile companies have the means to create better products successfully gathering immediate feedback for faster and more targeted business development.
  5. 5. The verticalisation of the digital economy is changing: ITE in the future is not in social, hardware, or health tech alone, it is where all these things are being interconnected. The rise of the “Internet of Things” and “Industry 4.0” as a result is an early indicator for this change in the ITE landscape. Entrepreneurship is the driving mechanism connecting verticals
  6. 6. Successful ITE is a question of scale: thousands of companies need to be created and most of them will fail in order for the unicorns of tomorrow to succeed.
  7. 7. S.W.O.T. On the ITE Ecosystem
  8. 8. Strength The cultural diversity of the European Union can positively impact building truly global companies. Entrepreneurs require support and incentives to understand that early internationalization in Europe is an opportunity to build global companies in a very large home market. Europe, currently recognized as a challenge in Entrepreneurship, could be redefined as its most significant strength.
  9. 9. Weakness The most apparent EU weakness is the lack of an integrated market. A successful European rollout of a product and addressing a European market from start is not today`s priority when scaling a fast growing business.
  10. 10. Opportunity A strong focus and support for early stage (scale!) and incentivizing cultural diversity as an opportunity to build businesses inside Europe that can then easily scale globally is the real opportunity at hand. Utmost innovative policies can make that possible, and the political awareness of the need of a strong European Digital Ecosystem as a continental counter balance has never been greater in the member states.
  11. 11. Threat The current privacy uproar in member states and a lack of understanding in the political sphere of the digital economy could lead to a nationalization of the Digital Economy activities. This could even gather local support from national tech players such as telecommunication companies, prohibiting innovation at scale in Europe as a continent. “The Open Internet” and “One European Market” - as visionary as they still seem - are a prerequisite for all activities in the future of ITE in Europe, and if not successfully implemented the most immanent threat.
  12. 12. ITE Ecosystem The three key contributors and their roles
  13. 13. Policy Policy can make or break the future of the ITE Ecosystem: creating a legal and social framework that not only supports but increasingly incentivizes all stages of Entrepreneurship individually is a huge opportunity. The first requirement is for policy makers to understand the Digital Economy, to not overregulate the Internet, and prevent nationally containing activities in the member states. The speed for implementation of new ideas in policy making for the ITE Ecosystem needs to be highly intensified.
  14. 14. Academia The academic world has the task to not only educate people in becoming Entrepreneurs, but also for Scientists to open up their magic box of potential products in research status to Founders. The Academic Institutions need to become more entrepreneurial in that: not only moderating the aforementioned process but also participating in risk and thus generating additional funding at scale.
  15. 15. Entrepreneurs & Corporations Successful Entrepreneurs have to take the time for extensive exchange with policy makers, to help design a functioning framework with their knowledge. Founders need to be incentivized, but also actively accept the challenge of early internationalization of their products in a culturally diverse and huge market: Europe. Large Corporations in Europe have the responsibility to participate in the ITE Ecosys-tem: not only to adopt to the changing landscape, but to support innovation for their home market and actively further support an intercontinental balance, with a long term Return On Investment strategy. Our society has to adopt culturally for people to undertake the challenge of founding a business more often, for the ITE Ecosystem to function at scale.
  16. 16. Conclusion
  17. 17. If anything by 2020 we could hear investors globally say to Founders: “If you want to build a global company, start in Europe.” Today you hear: “Move to the Valley, or find local money.” We believe scale at early stage and thus Innovation Through Entrepreneurship not only creates the jobs we need, but has the potential to transform our European society responsibly, creating wealth and distributing knowledge. To positively influence the development of ITE one has to think outside of the box like an innovator, have the guts to experiment like a Founder, and iterate like an Entrepreneur along the path of success. One has to “eat your own dog food”.
  18. 18. Further Readings & Publications
  19. 19. Policy Brief on the Startup Ecosystem from Germany A key finding of the group Forum Digitale Agenda is, that creating a regulatory definition in law textbooks to define startups, similar to the definition of SMB‘s that has widely been adopted by the member states, would significantly boost early stage growth and thus Innovation Through Entrepreneurship. The policy brief has been published here: http://www.stiftung-nv.de/152485,1031,111427,-1.aspx 1 A startup can defined as every lawful business, that 1.1 is funded at least 80% by its own capital or similar matters 1.2 (i) does not have more that [30] employees and was not founded more than five years ago; or (ii) shows a significant growth in employees, volume of sales, or profit with in a period of 24 months 1.3 has increased its volume of sales or profit by a minimum of x%
  20. 20. Policy Brief on Fostering a Startup Ecosystem by Up Global While supporting thousands of community leaders over the past six years, UP Global has consistently found itself at the center of larger conversations about what makes entrepreneurial ecosystems thrive. Fundamentally, the goal is to provide a global framework for these conversations, that can be adapted to support the unique efforts of the community leaders and entrepreneurs - wherever they may be. The white paper has been published here: http://blog.up.co/2014/09/08/white-paper-announcing-5-ingredients-fostering-thriving-startup-ecosystem/ Talent Density Programs like the proposed US “Startup Visa” and Startup Chile, the government’s successful pilot program to bring global innovators to contribute to their economy, are ways governments can invest in human capital. Supporting innovation hubs as we have seen in New York and Berlin, driving private sector invest - ment in Tech City in London, and creating physical hubs such as iHub in Nairobi can foster startup density. Culture Capital Regulatory Environment By celebrating failure through conferences like Failcon, opening a dialogue between entrepre - Israel’s subsidized incubator programs provide neurs and policymakers like the breakfasts at 10 access to capital, which is critical for new and Downing Street have done, and promoting jobs for growing businesses. startups, governments can help create an entre - preneurial culture. Finally, a stable, predictable, and supportive reg - ulatory environment is crucial to creating the nec - essary conditions for a thriving startup ecosystem. Tax policies can help companies start and grow, safe harbors allow companies to flourish, the free flow of information enables companies to com - pete globally, and intellectual property protection with flexible limitations to copyright and patent protections support innovation.
  21. 21. Study on german ecosystem by KPMG BvDS The study DSM has been published here: http://deutscherstartupmonitor.de/fileadmin/dsm/dsm-14/DSM-2014.pdf
  22. 22. Study on Berlin ecosystem by McKinsey The study „Berlin Gründet“ has been published here: http://www.mckinsey.de/berlin-gruendet Berliner Arbeitsmarkt – mit Gründungsinitiativen die von „Berlin 2020“ prognostizierten 500.000 Arbeitsplätze erreichen Erwartete Arbeitsmarktentwicklung in Berlin Zusätzliche sozialversicherungspflichtig Beschäftigte seit 2010 QUELLE: Bundesagentur für Arbeit; McKinsey 100.000 neue Jobs durch Initiativen 2010 2020 Ziel: 500.000 +3,1% p.a. 430.000 neue Jobs durch Fortschrei-bung der aktuellen Wachstums-dynamik Rund 40.000 neue Arbeitsplätze in inno-vativen Branchen durch 1. Erhöhung der Neu-gründungsquote 2. Senkung der Liqui-dationsquote bei Start-ups 3. Beschleunigtes Mitarbeiterwachs-tum in neuen und bestehenden Start-ups Rund 60.000 neue Arbeitsplätze über Multiplikatoreffekt1 1 Jeder neue Arbeitsplatz in einer hochproduktiven Branche schafft die Basis für 2 - 3 weitere Arbeitsplätze
  23. 23. Thank you. Contact simon@factoryberlin.com

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