Competing on Innovation, Quality, Partnering and Price:   Transforming and Amplifying the Future of the          State Com...
About Fort Hays State University•   Founded in 1902 as a “teaching academy” on 4,000 acres of    military land ceded to th...
About Fort Hays State University•   Founding member of the Higher Learning Commission’s    (HLC/NCA) alternative accredita...
About Fort Hays State University•   Branding Tagline: Affordable Success•   Enrollment: The Way We Were (Fall, 1998)     ...
Where in the World is FHSU?
The Future Isn’t What It Used To Be:        Change-Drivers Reshaping Higher Education•   The emergence of a more demanding...
The Future Isn’t What It Used To Be:       Change-Drivers Reshaping Higher Education•   Changing demographics/diversity•  ...
Taking Charge of Change:    Framing Strategic Choices/Inventing FHSU’s Future•   Analytical Questions for Developing Strat...
Mission-Centered, Market-Smart, Politically-Savvy:                 The Value Proposition• “….when the history of American ...
Mission-Centered, Market-Smart, Politically-Savvy:    Select Elements of the Value Proposition for FHSU•   Demographics (G...
Translating the Mission-Centered, Market-Smart, Politically-Savvy   Strategic Approach into Themes and Essential Competiti...
Using Themes to “Stretch” the Strategy:                Competing on Innovation• Envision and Introduce Curricular Products...
Using Themes to “Stretch” the Strategy:              Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI)•   Academic Quality Improvement ...
Using Themes to “Stretch” the Strategy:               Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI)•   New On-line Quality Course D...
Using Themes to “Stretch” the Strategy:                      Strategic Partnering•   “As institutions promote their indivi...
The FHSU-China Connection                                                                   Shenyang Normal  Tianjin Unive...
Using Themes to “Stretch” the Strategy:                    Competing on Price•   Without going into issues of price elasti...
Using Themes to “Stretch” the Strategy:                       Competing on Price•   On-Campus Tuition and Fees per credit ...
Developing Capabilities for Executing Strategy:                People and Leadership*•   “The good-to-great leaders began ...
Developing Capabilities to Execute Strategy:              Strategic Focus and Alignment*•   Council for Institutional Effe...
Developing Capabilities to Execute Strategy:        Operational Excellence and Management*•   Access, Affordability and Ta...
Developing Capabilities to Execute Strategy:         Operational Excellence and Management*•   Continuing discussion, impl...
• In closing, let me re-emphasize why FHSU thinks it’s so  important to “take charge of change”:      On the plains of hes...
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Competing on Innovation, Quality, Partnering, and Price

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Presented by Larry Gould, Provost
San Diego, February 2008

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Competing on Innovation, Quality, Partnering, and Price

  1. 1. Competing on Innovation, Quality, Partnering and Price: Transforming and Amplifying the Future of the State Comprehensive University “The best way to predict the future is to invent it”. ---Alan Kay
  2. 2. About Fort Hays State University• Founded in 1902 as a “teaching academy” on 4,000 acres of military land ceded to the state of Kansas by the federal government• Its state college role was expanded in the 1960s in response to the need for access/affordability for first generation and nontraditional students and the changing demands being place on other types of four year institutions (AASCU)• Assigned current liberal and applied arts mission in 1992 as one of three regional, state comprehensive universities in the Kansas Regents System (36 institutions) responsible for 66 western and central counties (52,000 square miles)
  3. 3. About Fort Hays State University• Founding member of the Higher Learning Commission’s (HLC/NCA) alternative accreditation track known as the Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP)• Academic Programming  52 undergraduate degree programs  19 graduate degree programs  25 programs completely accessible off-campus• General Structure  Three divisions: academic, student affairs, admin-finance  Four academic colleges, graduate school, distance education delivery unit called the Virtual College
  4. 4. About Fort Hays State University• Branding Tagline: Affordable Success• Enrollment: The Way We Were (Fall, 1998)  On-campus: 4718  Off-campus: 839  Grand total: 5557• Enrollment: The Way We Are (Fall, 2007)  On-campus: 4449  Off-campus: 5375 (2300 in China)  Grand total: 9824
  5. 5. Where in the World is FHSU?
  6. 6. The Future Isn’t What It Used To Be: Change-Drivers Reshaping Higher Education• The emergence of a more demanding, educated consumer with a “shopper’s mentality”  More choices among a wider array of options  Convenient, relevant and close to home learning experiences  Readiness to use several educational organizations on the way to one or more credentials• Growing pressure for flexibility/nimbleness to meet learner needs• Competition: new providers/old players• A growing, worldwide demand for learning
  7. 7. The Future Isn’t What It Used To Be: Change-Drivers Reshaping Higher Education• Changing demographics/diversity• Continuing need to integrate/apply technology• The realization of a lifelong relationship between work and learning• Greater segmentation of the learning marketplace• Caught in the squeeze: declining public funds vs. market opportunities• The public reform imperative: access, affordability, assessment and accountability
  8. 8. Taking Charge of Change: Framing Strategic Choices/Inventing FHSU’s Future• Analytical Questions for Developing Strategy What are the key issues/opportunities we face? How can we best compete? In what “direction” do we want to go?• In the Process of Responding to the Analytical Questions, What “Big, Hairy, Audacious Approach” Frames the FHSU Selection of Strategic Themes and Competitive Capabilities? An Approach/Guide for Shaping the FHSU Future: Mission-Centered, Market-Smart, Politically-Savvy
  9. 9. Mission-Centered, Market-Smart, Politically-Savvy: The Value Proposition• “….when the history of American higher education….in the 21 st century is written, we hope that becoming more market smart proves to be only part of the tale. The rest of the story ought to be about using market smarts to regain control of institutional mission---about the restoration of American colleges and universities as places of public purpose.” ---Zemsky, Wegner and Massey, Remaking the American American University: Market-Smart and Mission-Centered (2005), p. 202.
  10. 10. Mission-Centered, Market-Smart, Politically-Savvy: Select Elements of the Value Proposition for FHSU• Demographics (Growth and Diversity)• Caught in the Squeeze: Declining Public Funds• Financing Institutional Goals and Creating Campus Culture  Internationalization/Worldwide Demand for Learning  Technology: Mobile Learning and Enterprise Initiatives  Continuous Quality Improvement (AQIP)  Convenience of Access (graduation rate), Affordability of Access (low tuition), Learning Accountability (assessment), Faculty Enhancements• New Ways of Doing Business (flex, common course and redesign strategies/see Graves, “Voluntary Counter-Reformation”)• Energizing Mission, Public Purposes and the American Dream
  11. 11. Translating the Mission-Centered, Market-Smart, Politically-Savvy Strategic Approach into Themes and Essential Competitive Capabilities Strategic Approach Mission-Centered, Market-Smart, Politically-Savvy Continuous Strategic Quality Themes Innovation Partnering Price Improvement Interactive Competitive People Strategic Focus Operations Capabilities and and and Leadership Alignment Management
  12. 12. Using Themes to “Stretch” the Strategy: Competing on Innovation• Envision and Introduce Curricular Products – Online BBA in Management/Marketing (sustaining innovation) – Alternative Teacher Certification (low-end disruptive innovation) – Professional Science Masters (new market disruptive innovation)• Envision and Implement Curricular Reformation – MIS 101(course redesign to improve learning/reduce costs) – On-line Service Learning (unique off-campus learning and meeting public purposes)
  13. 13. Using Themes to “Stretch” the Strategy: Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI)• Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) – New, more inclusive view of institutional excellence (applies to all three divisions---see Ruben, Pursuing Excellence….2004) – New opportunities to leverage excellence across the institution, e.g. AQIP action plans (research, mobile learning, new annual reports) – Year of the Department (YOTD): A Call to Engagement (defining the faculty role in academic quality work/academic audit)• Office of Quality Management – Aligning process improvement and performance initiatives with long-term strategic planning, themes and priorities – Kansas Board of Regents Performance Agreements – Institutional Expansion of Academic Analytics
  14. 14. Using Themes to “Stretch” the Strategy: Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI)• New On-line Quality Course Development Process• New Student Outreach Call Center in Virtual College to Enhance Learner Relationship Management and Findings About Learner Satisfaction – Timeliness – Knowledgeable and courteous staff – Fair treatment – Expected outcome achieved• Institutional Performance Scorecard• Dare to Dream: Yearlong Organizational Rethinking and Restructuring Process (new units, programs, certificates, etc.)• Kansas Academy of Mathematics and Science
  15. 15. Using Themes to “Stretch” the Strategy: Strategic Partnering• “As institutions promote their individuality and autonomy, they will also need to enter into a wide array of partnerships and strategic alliances to maximize their effectiveness and quality.” --From the introductory message to the ACE web site by David Ward, 2007• For FHSU, strategic partnering is a leveraging process that expands growth, learning opportunities, energy and revenue while helping to implement strategy and maintain mission and public purpose.• Office of Strategic Partnerships• Internationalization of the Campus/Enrollment Management• Pioneer in Cross-Border Distance Education (China, 2300 students)
  16. 16. The FHSU-China Connection Shenyang Normal Tianjin University of UniversityScience and Technology Shenyang Tianjin Shenyang Beijing University of International Business and Economics Xinzheng BeijingHangzhou Normal University Sias International Hangzhou Hangzhou University Xinzheng Beijing Normal University Zhuhai Campus Zhuhai Taiwan Hong Kong Institute of Tak Ming College Continuing Education Taiwan Hong Kong
  17. 17. Using Themes to “Stretch” the Strategy: Competing on Price• Without going into issues of price elasticity, discounting and higher education price indices, FHSU’s ultimate goal (horizon 3) is to remain mission centered by spending its market earned marginal revenues to enhance access, increase affordability and maintain the traditional public purposes of the university. Price is determined by this careful balance between market, mission and academic values and the political savvy to understand that competitive pricing is closely tied to improvements in productivity and quality.• “To improve affordability, we propose a program of cost-cutting and productivity improvements….new performance benchmarks [and] lowering per-student educational costs by reducing barriers for transfer students” (lowest in Kansas Regents System). ---Spellings Commission• Average five year tuition increase: 5%
  18. 18. Using Themes to “Stretch” the Strategy: Competing on Price• On-Campus Tuition and Fees per credit hour Undergraduate Resident: $111.85 Graduate Resident: $154.65 Undergraduate Non-resident: $351.45 Graduate Non-resident: $408.65 Undergraduate Contiguous State & MSEP: $155.06 Graduate Contiguous State: $219.19• Virtual College Fees per credit hour Undergraduate Virtual College: $148.00 Graduate Virtual College: $197.25 Graduate MBA Virtual College : $400.00
  19. 19. Developing Capabilities for Executing Strategy: People and Leadership*• “The good-to-great leaders began the transformation by first getting the right people on the bus (and the wrong people off the bus)…. and the right people in the right seats---and then figured out where to drive it.” Jim Collins, From Good to Great, 2001, p. 63.• The Academic Compact: The Most Essential Social Software (YOTD)• FHSU Academy of Academic Leadership• You Are the Future: Yearlong New Faculty Orientation• Faculty Leadership/interim Opportunities/Talent Development and Succession Strategy• Center for Teaching Excellence (CTELT)/Faculty Enhancement Plan• Awards/Incentives/Amenities
  20. 20. Developing Capabilities to Execute Strategy: Strategic Focus and Alignment*• Council for Institutional Effectiveness (CIE) works to ensure that process improvement and resources are devoted to the Strategic Themes and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) that measure progress toward goal-achievement• AQIP Action Projects, the university strategic planning process and KBOR Performance Agreements serve as the foundation for cascading themes, goals, KPIs and information designed to “align” organizational with unit-level (college, departments, budget unit) plans and initiatives• Themes provide unit-level leaders with flexibility and freedom to innovate and develop goals of their own• Employees are engaged in activities and receive information to help understand the institution strategy, values, mission and capacity- building efforts (Performance Scorecard and YOTD)
  21. 21. Developing Capabilities to Execute Strategy: Operational Excellence and Management*• Access, Affordability and Talent Development (success) as branding elements are reinforced by operational excellence (quality). Since uniqueness is hard to achieve, the FHSU choice is to conduct “operations” better than any other SCU• Use Principles of Excellence/Not Business – Management by measurement/clarifying and improving processes – Service quality in on- and off-campus operations (e.g. telephone etiquette for administrative assistants) – CIE operational plan ties together people, strategy and operations – Review synchronization/alignment and need for strategy adaptation – Results management plan including annual reports from NSSE, CLA, FSSE, HERI, AQIP and specialized accreditation to close the accountability gap
  22. 22. Developing Capabilities to Execute Strategy: Operational Excellence and Management*• Continuing discussion, implementation and institutionalization of mission-centered structure and activities for serving public purposes – American Democracy Project (ADP) sponsored by AASCU (see FHSU ADP web site) – Center for Civic Leadership (Tigers in Service, Kansas Youth Leadership Academy[KYLA] camps, service learning, Ben Franklin Papers project, etc. – Diversity Learning – Internationalization/Seven Revolutions*Adapted in part from Bossidy, L. and Charam, R., Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done, 2002.
  23. 23. • In closing, let me re-emphasize why FHSU thinks it’s so important to “take charge of change”: On the plains of hesitation, bleach the bones of countless millions who at the dawn of victory, sat down to wait….and waiting, died. George W. Cecil, 1923Thank you. Questions?Available at: <www.fhsu.edu/provost>

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