3 accra july 2013 final

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  • 3 accra july 2013 final

    1. 1. PR O JE C T 106511 UNDERUTILIZED INDIGENOUS VEGETABLES FOR FOOD SECURITY AND  LIVELIHOOD RESILIENCE IN NIGERIA O. Clement Adebooye, PhD. (Ibadan) Africa Agricultural Science Week, Accra, Ghana July, 2013
    2. 2. NiCanVeg Project 106511 (Nigeria and Canada Under-utilized Vegetables Project) Best UIV processing and preservation Best UIV processing and preservation Hands-on Training of farmers & Radio campaigns Hands-on Training of farmers & Radio campaigns Cross Border Cooperation to build knowledge and capacity  Continental: Nigeria and Canada Inter University: UNIOSUN, UofM, CBU, OAU Funding Agency: IDRC-CIDA Other organizations: FADAMA, Germany Cross Border Cooperation to build knowledge and capacity  Continental: Nigeria and Canada Inter University: UNIOSUN, UofM, CBU, OAU Funding Agency: IDRC-CIDA Other organizations: FADAMA, Germany Formation of UIV cooperative groups and initiating savings culture Formation of UIV cooperative groups and initiating savings culture Women economic empowerment and household food securityWomen economic empowerment and household food security Optimum seeding density, seeding method, cutting length, staking option Breaking seed dormancy Optimum seeding density, seeding method, cutting length, staking option Breaking seed dormancy The Key Messages
    3. 3. Urban population {~35%} Urban population {~35%} Rural women and men farmers. {~65%} Rural women and men farmers. {~65%} Indigenous vegetables in the wild Indigenous vegetables in the wild The Challenge •Highly cherished and valued •Gathered from the wild •Gathered by women •Not researched Research and Policy Research and Policy •Stereotyped to some elite crops •Budgetary allocation never for edible wild plants •Resource poor •Mostly illiterate •Women sustain several homes •No link with science
    4. 4. Project Objectives Raise awareness on the nutritional values and usability of under- utilized vegetables. Diversify food base and increase income opportunities of the poor rural population. Develop best management practices for UIVs to encourage cultivation and foster genetic resources conservation Reinforce capacity by training of women farmers and extension agents, students, research personnel and all other stakeholders in skill acquisition Disseminate information to the resource poor women farmers, scientists, non-governmental organization and government.
    5. 5. Producing high value indigenous vegetables for food and economic security! The Science in the NiCanVeg concept Uptake promotion and scaling up Gender mainstreaming in the value chain of UIVs Intelligent technology for resource management and processing of UIVs Development of best package for the UIVs through on-farm research Conservation of genetic resources
    6. 6. Farmers are proud and have sense of belonging, perhaps becoming scientists! What is innovative? Extensive and large- scale training of farmers and public advocacy Formation of farmers cooperative groups for financial sustenance Field research done on farmers farms and managed by FADAMA-FARMER- RESEARCHER Integration of NiCanVeg with the FADAMA, resulting in Researcher-Government linkage Sustainable seed production
    7. 7. Where are we working? Four States in Southwest Nigeria: Osun, Oyo, Ondo and Ekiti Two agro-ecologies per State: Rainforest Derived savanna Experimental sites: Two sites per ecology resulting in 16 sites.
    8. 8. Igbagba, Ogunmo, Tete atetedaye, Odu, Ebolo Concluded Studies Cutting length studies Investigation of planting spacing Optimum seeding density and seeding method Ugu, Tomati elejo Woorowo Breaking of seed dormancy Igbagba Training of Women and farmers Food values analyses Baseline survey
    9. 9. Vegetable Seasons Total carotenoid Total flavonoids Total Phenolics Total phytate Chl a Chl b mg/100 g fw CE/100 g fw GAE/10 0g fw mg/100g fw g/100g fw T. occidentalis Rain 26.0 66.1 42.1 3.3 1.31 0.33 Dry 27.5 67.1 44.8 3.2 1.46 0.47 t-test 0.069* 0.559 ns 0.083* 0.423 ns 0.072* 0.10* S. macrocarpon Rain 36.8 50.9 65.1 2.2 1.44 0.48 Dry 39.6 51.8 68.1 2.2 1.55 0.52 t-test 0.189ns 0.566 ns 0.085* 0.423 ns 0.033* 0.020* S. scabrum Rain 23.1 45.6 64.5 3.1 1.21 0.35 Dry 22.8 47.5 46.0 3.2 1.31 0.40 t-test 0.398ns 0.223 ns 0.001* 0.199ns 0.013* 0.010* Nutraceutical profiles of Telfairia occidentalis, Solanum macrocarpon and Solanum scabrum Dry season crops contain higher amounts of most nutraceutics. Chl a to Chl b ratio is 4:1 for ugu and 3:1 for igbagba and ogunmo. Flavonoids highest in ugu while phenolics and carotenoids are highest in igbagba. Flavonoids level declined sharply in ogunmo during the dry season. Phytate level is safe for humans.
    10. 10. Time series of fortnightly leaf yield of igbagba across two seeding rates, 16 locations and two seasons in SW Nigeria Time series of fortnightly leaf yield of ugu across three populations, two seasons and16 locations in SW Nigeria
    11. 11. Vegetable *Production cost/6m2 (Naira) **Revenue/6m2 (Naira) Profit/6m2 (Naira) Rain season Dry season Rain Season Dry season Rain season Dry season Igbagba* 1,045 2,120 2,400 4,800 1,355 2,680 Tete 105 210 320 640 215 430 Ugu* 1,250 2,760 5,000 10,000 3,750 7,240 Woorowo 1,160 2,200 4,800 9,600 3,640 7,400 Ebolo 65 130 180 270 115 140 Yanrin 65 130 150 250 85 120 Odu 65 130 180 270 115 140 Ogunmo 65 130 180 270 115 140 Tomati Elejo ** ** ** ** ** ** Ewuro ** ** ** ** ** ** Summary of production cost, revenue generation and profit (Naira) of UIVs enterprise in Southwest Nigeria. Calculations are based on the leaf yields obtained by using Project 106511 best agronomic methods. Data are not available for Tomati Elejo and Ewuro because of lack of patronage. *On Ugu and Igbagba farmers realize these revenues fortnightly for a six month period.
    12. 12. Luxuriant igbagba Luxuriant woorowo ugu Ogunmo
    13. 13. Summary of findings: Impact on farmers practices 1. The baseline study in 72 locations on 4,600 farmers showed that 70% of the vegetable producers are women, and 80% of the processors and marketers are women. 2. There are 553 farmers (336 men and 217 women) directly involved in on-farm experimentations at 16 locations in the four States. This figure is 5x higher than 100 farmers being supported by the federal government of Nigeria. 3. The project which is focused on improving the livelihood of rural female farmers, has developed improved agronomic practices such as optimum seeding rates, seeding methods and harvesting techniques.
    14. 14. . 4. Seed treatment is now a routine for farmers since it reduces the need for spraying the vegetables against insects. 5. Simple technology for breaking seed dormancy for igbagba which has reduced the germination time from 21-30 days to only 7-9 days. This is a 66% reduction in the time between planting, to harvest and marketing. This makes growing these vegetable more attractive for food and income as well as a more cost effective use of lands and inputs. 6. Farmers now know that woorowo could be grown outside cacao plantation. 7. Awareness by radio jingles and ongoing training sessions and information packages describing the agronomy, nutritional and economic values of these vegetables have created interests all over southwest Nigeria in respect of UIVs health benefits and economic potential.
    15. 15. Implications Agronomic package: Underutilized Indigenous Vegetables and production innovations already developed and documented as VegNews and fact-sheets publication. UIVs can be economically and successfully grown under domestic conditions. Optimum cutting length, seeding density and seeding method already tested and validated. Gender Empowerment: • Gender Impact - Poor rural women farmers (over 40% of project participants) have been empowered through collaborative and participatory demonstrations/training. Cooperative groups have been formed and savings cultured introduced to farmers and marketers of UIVs Awareness: • Social impact is growing rapidly through radio communication(about 3m people are reached daily via radio), newspaper articles and direct contacts on the need for growing and consuming locally grown nutritious indigenous vegetables. • Government of Oyo State use our project sites as visitation sites during farmers training sessions Economic potential in the market place: • Increased income for producers and sellers - • Incentives for scaling up – rationale for further investing in farming UIVs in SW Nigeria • Spin-offs for small local agric-businesses to provide inputs (credit, seeds, cuttings, fertilizers, etc.)
    16. 16. Impact of Radio Jingles • Over 3million Nigerians reached daily on Radio FM 89.5 “Orisun FM, Ile-Ife, Osun State”. • Over 5 million Nigerians reached weekly on weekly radio programmes on FM 103.5 and FM 89.5. • Callers on telephone reach us (~20/week). • ~3 E-mail contacts/week • Numerous direct personal contacts. • The advocacy has spurred Osun and Oyo States governments to establish indigenous vegetables units in the Ministry of Agriculture • Three of our project farmers were recruited by the Oyo State Government as resource persons at agric training.
    17. 17. Farmers Testimonies: • A group of 18 women vegetable farmers at Akure said, “Thank God for this project. We now export ugu to Abuja and other States. Our income has doubled in one year.” • Farmers at Inisha said, “We got the technology of ugu cultivation from this project. Now we are making cool money. The market is now big and demand is higher than supply, no glut at all.” • Farmer at Akanran said, “Knowledge of igbagba and ugu production is now a blessing. Our incomes have risen in 2 years. I bought a piece of land and started my own house. Thanks to the project.” • Farmer at Osogbo said, “You need to move this project forward by reaching more States and poor farmers. 2014 is not a good time to terminate this good work. We want to continue to see the project scientists. They are great people.”
    18. 18. Training of College of Agriculture students on Project 106511 Site
    19. 19. Collaboration at work !!
    20. 20. NiCanVeg Project 106511 (Nigeria and Canada Under-utilized Vegetables Project) Best UIV processing and preservation Best UIV processing and preservation Hands-on Training of farmers & Radio campaigns Hands-on Training of farmers & Radio campaigns Cross Border Cooperation to build knowledge and capacity  Continental: Nigeria and Canada Inter University: UNIOSUN, UofM, CBU, OAU Funding Agency: IDRC-CIDA Other organizations: FADAMA, Germany Cross Border Cooperation to build knowledge and capacity  Continental: Nigeria and Canada Inter University: UNIOSUN, UofM, CBU, OAU Funding Agency: IDRC-CIDA Other organizations: FADAMA, Germany Formation of UIV cooperative groups and initiating savings culture Formation of UIV cooperative groups and initiating savings culture Women economic empowerment and household food securityWomen economic empowerment and household food security Optimum seeding density, seeding method, cutting length, staking option Breaking seed dormancy Optimum seeding density, seeding method, cutting length, staking option Breaking seed dormancy The Key Messages
    21. 21. Thanks for your

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