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Transitioning to Climate-Smart Agriculture: What will it take?

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Transitioning to Climate-Smart Agriculture: What will it take?

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Transitioning to Climate-Smart Agriculture: What will it take?

  1. 1. Transitioning to CLIMATE-SMART Agriculture: what will it take? Andrea Cattaneo Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN Parallel Event – SBSTA 36 Bonn, Germany, May 16, 2012 www.fao.org/climatechange/climatesmart
  2. 2. CSA involves multiple objectives. Prioritizing them depends on the role of agriculture in economy and society. In low income, highly agricultural dependent economies where CC impacts are estimated to be significant and negative, CSA involves agricultural growth for food security that incorporates necessary adaptation, and captures potential mitigation
  3. 3. Why is it important now? • Agricultural growth key to reducing food insecurity – The agriculture sector is the main source of livelihoods of most of the world’s food insecure and the largest growth in projected populations is expected to occur in agricultural-based economies that already have high food insecurity. • Negative CC impacts projected for agricultural-based poor areas- thus adaptation is necessary to achieve food security/poverty reduction – adverse impacts of climate change will increase difficulty of obtaining needed agricultural growth. IPCC: Africa to be hardest hit – Impacts on average and variability of climatic variables • Climate financing provides an opportunity to tap additional resources – Accessing climate finance will depend on showing mitigation and adaptation results in the context of development.
  4. 4. 1) Three partner countries (Malawi, Zambia, Vietnam) 2) Four main objectives • Build an evidence base to inform practice, policy and investment choices • Identify country specific climate smart agricultural practices • Identify mechanisms for promoting action and channeling climate finance to CSA activities • Develop investment proposals for climate smart agriculture project 3) Expected Outcomes • Climate smart agricultural solutions for different contexts • Appropriate instruments for prioritization, financing, and adoption • Capacity to implement CSA approaches, integrating climate change, agricultural development and food security across relevant policy frameworks . Climate Smart Agriculture: Capturing the Synergies between Mitigation, Adaptation and Food Security
  5. 5. Agricultural growth strategies for food security and poverty reduction: what have we learned? • “Business as usual” focus on increasing input use (fertilizer, improved seeds, irrigation) increasing average productivity in high potential zones; generating unintended negative environmental impacts. • New challenges: resource scarcity, higher rates of volatility (from markets as well as climate), degraded ecosystems, rising energy costs implies need for systems that: 1) Resilient to shocks 2) Efficient in input use 3) Build and use ecosystem services for agriculture 4) Reduce pollution 4)
  6. 6. • Climate-smart agriculture is context dependent • CSA requires the development of a country-specific evidence base, which provides relative costs and benefits of sustainable agricultural practices in terms of food security, adaptation, and GHG mitigation • The evidence-base is necessary for prioritizing actions and accessing climate finance Transitioning to climate smart agriculture: what will it take? Focus on evidence base so as to target financing
  7. 7. CSA Adoption Costs and Barriers Up-front financing costs can be high, but on-farm benefits not realized until medium-long term Local credit markets very thin Local insurance options very limited Tenure Security & Management of Common-Pool Resources Limited Access to Information, e.g. Research & Extension Risk management and need for flexibility Photos: FAO Mediabase
  8. 8. 1) Three partner countries (Malawi, Zambia, Vietnam) 2) Four main objectives • Build an evidence base to inform practice, policy and investment choices • Identify country specific climate smart agricultural practices • Identify mechanisms for promoting action and channeling climate finance to CSA activities • Develop investment proposals for climate smart agriculture project 3) Expected Outcomes • Climate smart agricultural solutions for different contexts • Appropriate instruments for prioritization, financing, and adoption • Capacity to implement CSA approaches, integrating climate change, agricultural development and food security across relevant policy frameworks . Climate Smart Agriculture: Capturing the Synergies between Mitigation, Adaptation and Food Security
  9. 9. Thank you!

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