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A Quantitative Approach toDetermining Waiting Periodsfor FMD Freedom   Angus Cameron
Conclusions   Quantitative calculation of appropriate    waiting periods is possible       Need to change standard used ...
Overview   Waiting periods   Surveillance standards   Calculations   Implications
Waiting periods   OIE Code for FMD       Periods of 3, 6, 12, 18, 24 months depending on        situation   What is the...
Purpose of waiting periods   Allow disease to spread       Reach a detectable level (design prevalence)       Non-vacci...
Time and confidence in freedom   Intuitive principles    1. Old surveillance loses value    2. Confidence accumulates ove...
Quantifying effects of time   Decrease of value of old surveillance    Example:     Serosurvey achieving 95% surveillanc...
Decay in confidence with time   Due to risk of introduction of disease   Perfect biosecurity       No loss in confidence
Accumulation in confidence   Ongoing surveillance activities       Passive farmer reporting       Abattoir surveillance...
Surveillance standards:Traditional approach   Surveillance sensitivity       Pr(S+ | D+)       Probability of detecting...
Surveillance sensitivity   Contributing factors       Sample size       Individual test sensitivity       Design preva...
Surveillance standards:Alternative approach   Probability of freedom       Pr(D- | S-)       Probability that the popul...
Probability of freedom   Contributing factors       Surveillance sensitivity           Sample size, design prevalence, ...
Calculation
1              0.9              0.8                                                                                       ...
Tools for calculation   Free on-line tool to do calculations       Multiple surveillance components       Multiple time...
Implications   Time to target probability of freedom       Shorter with           Higher sensitivity surveillance      ...
Calculating appropriate waitingperiods1.   Set target probability of freedom2.   Identify surveillance components     cont...
Freedom with vaccination   Effects of vaccination       Lower within-herd design prevalence       Lower sensitivity of ...
Conclusions   Quantitative calculation of appropriate    waiting periods is possible       Need to change standard used ...
Acknowledgements   Tony Martin   Evan Sergeant   Tripartite workshop participants       Turkey           Adil ADIGÜZE...
Session 2: A Quantitative approach to determining waiting period for FMD freedom
Session 2: A Quantitative approach to determining waiting period for FMD freedom
Session 2: A Quantitative approach to determining waiting period for FMD freedom
Session 2: A Quantitative approach to determining waiting period for FMD freedom
Session 2: A Quantitative approach to determining waiting period for FMD freedom
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Session 2: A Quantitative approach to determining waiting period for FMD freedom

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Global and regional standards for the demonstration of freedom from FMD often include a mandatory waiting period. More recently, the probability of freedom has been used as a quantitative standard for surveillance. This is the population-level analogy of the negative predictive value of a test on an individual animal, and can be calculated from the surveillance sensitivity using a Bayesian approach. In addition to the above factors, the probability of freedom takes further factors into account: the combined sensitivity of multiple surveillance activities (e.g. sero-surveillance and clinical surveillance), the probability of re-introduction of disease per unit time (i.e. biosecurity measures in place), and the accumulation of surveillance evidence over time. The ability to quantitatively capture time-related aspects of the probability of freedom provides a mechanism to evaluate appropriate waiting periods for FMD freedom. This paper illustrates the use of this approach, providing examples of how the appropriate waiting periods may be calculated, based on different approaches to eradication and surveillance.

(c) A. Cameron / EuFMD (eufmd@fao.org)

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Session 2: A Quantitative approach to determining waiting period for FMD freedom

  1. 1. A Quantitative Approach toDetermining Waiting Periodsfor FMD Freedom Angus Cameron
  2. 2. Conclusions Quantitative calculation of appropriate waiting periods is possible  Need to change standard used to assess surveillance  From surveillance sensitivity to probability of freedom Appropriate waiting periods depend on  Sensitivity of ongoing surveillance activities  Probability of introduction of infection  Use of vaccination
  3. 3. Overview Waiting periods Surveillance standards Calculations Implications
  4. 4. Waiting periods OIE Code for FMD  Periods of 3, 6, 12, 18, 24 months depending on situation What is the purpose? How were they determined? Are they correct?
  5. 5. Purpose of waiting periods Allow disease to spread  Reach a detectable level (design prevalence)  Non-vaccinated non-immune population  Rapid spread, very short period required  Vaccinated population  Slower spread, may require more time Allow disease to be detected by surveillance  Ongoing surveillance (e.g. passive farmer reporting)  More time = more surveillance = more confidence
  6. 6. Time and confidence in freedom Intuitive principles 1. Old surveillance loses value 2. Confidence accumulates over time How to describe these effects quantitatively?
  7. 7. Quantifying effects of time Decrease of value of old surveillance Example:  Serosurvey achieving 95% surveillance sensitivity  No positive animals detected  Scenario 1:  Completed one month ago  Are we confident that the population is free now?  Scenario 2:  Same survey conducted 5 years ago  Are we confident that the population is free now?
  8. 8. Decay in confidence with time Due to risk of introduction of disease Perfect biosecurity  No loss in confidence
  9. 9. Accumulation in confidence Ongoing surveillance activities  Passive farmer reporting  Abattoir surveillance  Active negative clinical reporting Individual observations  Relatively low sensitivity Longer waiting time  More observations, higher surveillance sensitivity
  10. 10. Surveillance standards:Traditional approach Surveillance sensitivity  Pr(S+ | D+)  Probability of detecting at least on positive animal given that the population is infected at the design prevalence  Only standard used in OIE code  Sometimes called ‘confidence’  Usually set at 95%
  11. 11. Surveillance sensitivity Contributing factors  Sample size  Individual test sensitivity  Design prevalence  Risk-based sampling  Does not capture effect of time
  12. 12. Surveillance standards:Alternative approach Probability of freedom  Pr(D- | S-)  Probability that the population is free from disease (at the design prevalence), given that surveillance found no positive animals  Calculated using Bayes’ Theorem  Intuitively easier for regulators to understand
  13. 13. Probability of freedom Contributing factors  Surveillance sensitivity  Sample size, design prevalence, test Se, risk-based sampling  Multiple surveillance activities  e.g. serosurveillance + passive reporting + abattoir  Accumulation of historical evidence over time  Risk of introduction of disease over time
  14. 14. Calculation
  15. 15. 1 0.9 0.8 SSSe 0.7Probability P(free) 0.6 P(intro) 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Time Period
  16. 16. Tools for calculation Free on-line tool to do calculations  Multiple surveillance components  Multiple time periods  Herd-level data  Herd- and animal-level risk based sampling http://epitools.ausvet.com.au  Access currently limited while under development  Will be made public on completion of project
  17. 17. Implications Time to target probability of freedom  Shorter with  Higher sensitivity surveillance  Larger sample size  Good risk-based sampling  Higher sensitivity test system  Higher design prevalence  More surveillance components  Lower probability of introduction
  18. 18. Calculating appropriate waitingperiods1. Set target probability of freedom2. Identify surveillance components contributing evidence of freedom3. Estimate sensitivity of each component4. Estimate probability of introduction5. Calculate time to achieve target
  19. 19. Freedom with vaccination Effects of vaccination  Lower within-herd design prevalence  Lower sensitivity of clinical surveillance Result  Lower surveillance sensitivity  Longer waiting period required
  20. 20. Conclusions Quantitative calculation of appropriate waiting periods is possible  Need to change standard used to assess surveillance  From surveillance sensitivity to probability of freedom Appropriate waiting periods depend on  Sensitivity of ongoing surveillance activities  Probability of introduction of infection  Use of vaccination
  21. 21. Acknowledgements Tony Martin Evan Sergeant Tripartite workshop participants  Turkey  Adil ADIGÜZEL  Abdulnaci BULUT  Bulgaria  Pencho KAMENOV  Tsviatko ALEXANDROV  Greece  Achilles SACHPATZIDIS  Maria TOPKARIDO EuFMD

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