Policies Toward Family Farming: Major Insights of a Recent Review

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Side Event at CFS organised by The Philippines and France October 8th, 2013

Jean-Michel Sourisseau for the Cirad team

-What is and what weighs family farming?
-A massive but diverse reality
-Family farming is critical for food security
-Productions and markets
-Employment
-Family and local solidarities
-Natural ressources management
-Paradoxes, tensions and threats
-What policies towards sustainable family farming?
-New roles for agriculture?
-Changing the vision, re-investing in strategies and policies

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Policies Toward Family Farming: Major Insights of a Recent Review

  1. 1. Policies  Toward  Family  Farming:   Major  Insights  of  a  Recent  Review   Developing  public  policies  towards   sustainable  family  farming   Side  Event  organised   by  The  Philippines  and  France     October  8th,  2013   Jean-­‐Michel  Sourisseau   for  the  Cirad  team  
  2. 2. What  is  and  what  weighs  family  farming?   Family  Farming:  essen%ally  based  on  family  labour      A  close  link  between  family  ↔  farm     Agriculture  provides  a  living  to  2,6  bn  people  and  employs  1,3  bn  workers     è   40%  of  world’s  total  and  ac%ve  popula%on     Self-­‐employment  is  the  rule…     è Family  farming  is  a  massive  phenomenon…   and  will  keep  its  core  posiKon  for  a  while  
  3. 3. A  massive  but  diverse  reality   Mali   Brazil   Indonesia   Family  farming:   è   spreads  across  all  con%nents  and  ecologies   è   is  based  on  a  wide  range  of  technical  knowledge   è   is  connected  to  markets  through  all  types  of  channels   Yaounde   Benin   Amazonia   Bhutan  
  4. 4. Family  farming  is  criKcal  for  food  security   è   producing  goods,  supplying  markets,  generaKng  incomes   è   providing  employment  and  sustaining  livelihoods   è   feeding  intra  familial  and  local  solidariKes   è   managing  natural  resources   è   strengthening  local  development  
  5. 5. ProducKons  and  markets   rice plantains  (bananas) roots  and  tubers coffee cocoa palm  oil cotton rubber
  6. 6. Employment   Indonesia (48M  4%) Other  Asia (210M  16%) Brazil  (11M  0 ,8%) Ssa  Africa (203M  15%) India  (267M  20%) Others  (83M  7 %) Mexico  (8M  0 ,6%) Other  L atin  A mérica   (23M  1 ,7%) North  Am (3M  0,2%) Europe  (12M  1 %) China (497M  38%) Others  (26M  2%) source:  FAOSTAT PluriacKvity  is   widespread,     strengthens  cross-­‐ sector  linkages  and   local  development  
  7. 7. Family  and  local  solidariKes   Intrafamilial  solidarity  Kes  …   Social  links  shaping  local  development  and  idenKty   A  safety  net  in  case  of  crisis  
  8. 8. Natural  ressources  management   Various  impacts  depending  on:   •   technical  systems,   •   popula%on  density,   •   public  policies   High   environnemental   impact   autonomy     A  good  knowledge  of  local   biodiversity  and  ecosystems…   dependance   Low   environnemental   impact    
  9. 9. Paradoxes,  tensions  and  threats   Family  farming:       è   concentrate  70%  of  world’s  extreme  poverty     è   oIen  provides  low  labor  income     è   some%mes  hampers  young  people  and  women  emancipa%on     è  Is  challenged  and  has  to  struggle  with  more  compe%%ve  forms  of  agriculture   •   for  assets  (and  specially  land)   •   on  markets,  including  domes%c  ones  
  10. 10. What  policies  towards  sustainable  family  farming?   Agricultural  policies  historically  focused  on  producKon  increase:   •   moderniza%on  of  farm  structures     •   technical  change   è  through  massive  supports:  public  investments,  guaranteed  prices,   grants,  subsidies,  market  protec%on   As  a  result:  producKvity  gaps  from  1  to  1000  between  regions  and  types  of  farming   Type  of  farming   Manual     Green  revoluKon,     Green  revoluKon,   Motorized   manual   animal  tracKon   %  of  world  ag.  workers   35%   32%   32%   2%   Nb  of  workers  (millions)   450   410   410   30   Area/worker   1  ha   1  ha   5  ha   100  ha   1  t   10  t   50  t   1000  t   Produc%on/worker   Breakdown  based  on  Mazoyer  (FAO,  2001)    
  11. 11. New  roles  for  agriculture?   è  Globally,  the  reproduc%on  of  the  historical  model  based  on  convenKonal   modernizaKon  with  high  fossil  energy  and  chemical  contents  is  ques%oned     è  In  order  to  reach  sustainable  development,  there  is  a  need  for  renewed   public    policies     è   Some  significant  shiIs  are  occurring  in  different  regions  and  countries:   è   new  policies  fostering  “territorial”  development   è   massive  social  policies   è   new  types  of  training  systems  and  supports  in  agriculture   è experimenta%on  of  new  technical  systems   è   In  some  countries,  specially  in  La%n  America,  dual  policies  are  being   implemented  
  12. 12. Changing  the  vision,   re-­‐invesKng  in  strategies  and  policies   è   No  room  for  unique  and  simplisKc  responses     è   Re-­‐invesKng  in  “tailor-­‐made”  development  strategies     è   Family  farming  faces  problems,  but  is  also  strongly  part  of  the  soluKon:   the  voice  of  family  farmers  is  needed  in  the  policy  debate       The  common  challenge:     to  shi[  from  narrow  agricultural  development  models   to  integrated  and  territorial  models  for  sustainable  development  

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