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ORGANIC ARABICA COFFEE
AGRO-ECOLOGY PRACTICETHROUGH DIRECT MARKETING
BY SMALLHOLDER INDIGENOUS FARMERS INTHAILAND
Thirach ...
ABSTRACT
Small farmers have been facing many challenges to develop and deliver their safe-food to
consumers including:
I. ...
ABSTRACT (2)
more visible and more demand of good agro-ecological practice
create good practiced produces through brand pr...
INTRODUCTION
The Communal Life of Love and Unity of the
Mountain People (CLUMP foundation)
- 1,144 smallholder indigenous ...
MARKET ACCESS THROUGH DIRECT MARKETING
INCREASING IMPORTANT ROLE IN SUSTAINABLEVALUE CHAIN
Product development:The first 4...
MEASURABLE BENEFITS FOR THE MEMBERS
 Positive Effects: Quantitive indicators
During 2014-2015 total of 1,144 families
 I...
ORGANIC CERTIFICATION AND BRAND PROMISES
Environmental
benefits
Economic
benefits
Social
benefits
1) To create visibility ...
The freshly picked coffee cherries are perishable while
turning coffee cherries to green beans and ready to
drink roasted ...
Price strategy
 Product differentiation and brand creation
 Unique characteristic at more affordable
prices
 Higher bra...
Non financial Immediate benefits:
 Preserve the existing rain forest
 Strengthen the community bond
 Knowledge developm...
CONCLUSION
 Market development to support
smallholder farmers
 Lower the overhead cost while increase
market access thro...
Q & A
Organic Arabica Coffee: Agroecologicaly practices through direct marketing by smallholder Indigenous farmers in Thailand
Organic Arabica Coffee: Agroecologicaly practices through direct marketing by smallholder Indigenous farmers in Thailand
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Organic Arabica Coffee: Agroecologicaly practices through direct marketing by smallholder Indigenous farmers in Thailand

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http://www.fao.org/asiapacific/events/detail-events/en/c/1262/

Presentation of Thirach Rungruangkanokkul, from AFMA Asia, on direct marketing by smallholder Agroecology farmers in Thailand. The presentation was prepared and delivered in occasion of the Regional Symposium on Agroecology in Asia and the Pacific, held in Bangkok, Senegal on 24-26 November 2015.

© FAO: http://www.fao.org

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Organic Arabica Coffee: Agroecologicaly practices through direct marketing by smallholder Indigenous farmers in Thailand

  1. 1. ORGANIC ARABICA COFFEE AGRO-ECOLOGY PRACTICETHROUGH DIRECT MARKETING BY SMALLHOLDER INDIGENOUS FARMERS INTHAILAND Thirach Rungruangkanokkul Executive Director Agricultural and Food Marketing Association for Asia and the Pacific(AFMA) Thirach.R@AfmaAsia.Org
  2. 2. ABSTRACT Small farmers have been facing many challenges to develop and deliver their safe-food to consumers including: I. capacity for good agro-ecological practice and market access II. negative chemical effects from neighboring contaminated farms III. relatively low and fluctuate crop prices in partial value chain IV. limited negotiating power and time constraint V. high individual logistic management cost VI. management and marketing cost VII. limited manpower
  3. 3. ABSTRACT (2) more visible and more demand of good agro-ecological practice create good practiced produces through brand promise gain more reasonable market price and ability to communicate directly to consumers perform more important role in sustainable value chain
  4. 4. INTRODUCTION The Communal Life of Love and Unity of the Mountain People (CLUMP foundation) - 1,144 smallholder indigenous farming families - growing Arabica coffee under the shade of high altitude rain forests - Organic system for biodiversity and sustainability
  5. 5. MARKET ACCESS THROUGH DIRECT MARKETING INCREASING IMPORTANT ROLE IN SUSTAINABLEVALUE CHAIN Product development:The first 4 P’s with Agro- Ecological practice  Organic coffee cherries are procured with 15-25% price premium to the indigenous small farmers.  Every single coffee cherry is hand-picked, roasted and grounded by manually honey- processed.
  6. 6. MEASURABLE BENEFITS FOR THE MEMBERS  Positive Effects: Quantitive indicators During 2014-2015 total of 1,144 families  Improved the green coffee bean price of at least THB 5.0 per kilo (USD 0.143) to network members.  CLUMP foundation beneficiaries were gradually increased in 2015.
  7. 7. ORGANIC CERTIFICATION AND BRAND PROMISES Environmental benefits Economic benefits Social benefits 1) To create visibility through organic learning - implementing - and certifying. 2) To better understand the benefit of organic farming in 3 key areas:
  8. 8. The freshly picked coffee cherries are perishable while turning coffee cherries to green beans and ready to drink roasted coffee have added value with longer shelf life
  9. 9. Price strategy  Product differentiation and brand creation  Unique characteristic at more affordable prices  Higher brand communication and logistic cost Channel of Distribution  Supply green beans to institution buyers and international roasters  Retail 'LIFE Coffee' through retail outlets and e-commerce  Ready to drink through own retail outlets
  10. 10. Non financial Immediate benefits:  Preserve the existing rain forest  Strengthen the community bond  Knowledge development  Awaken the sense of belonging to the need to co-exist happily with nature Long term nonfinancial benefits:  Re-foresting the barren land  Witness and sustain the values of holistic living among mountain peoples.  Modify and apply traditional life style fitting to the fast changing mainstream development.  Nature will regain its resources and prosperity.
  11. 11. CONCLUSION  Market development to support smallholder farmers  Lower the overhead cost while increase market access through direct marketing and cooperatives  Agro-ecological practices with 3 sustainable pillars including economic, social, and environment.
  12. 12. Q & A

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