Near East & North Africa
15-18 December 2013
Technical Session 2:
Use of treated waste water in forestry and agroforestry ...
NENA Countries

• Evapotranspiration
exceeds precipitation
– no matter the
amount

• Water scarcity limits
the production ...
Forestry
in some Mediterranean countries with arid
zones
Country Total forest
area
mill ha

Planted forest
area
mill ha

%...
Non-conventional waters

• Alternative sources of water to be utilized in
support of fresh waters (mainly agriculture
and ...
Use of non conventional waters in arid zones, why?
•

•
•

•
•
•
•

To improve availability of water in arid
zones
To redu...
Non-conventional waters
• Seawater

• Brackish water
• Harvested rainwater

• Ground water
• Agricultural drainage water

...
Urban wastewater
• Is an unconventional and
non-competitive water
resource with fresh water
• Is often the most available
...
Treated wastewater, why?
•

Arid zones countries are lacking of fresh water and are “reach” of
untreated waste water

•

W...
FAO Forestry priorities on TWW
•

•
•
•
•

Support food security through the safe use of nonconventional water in forestry...
Testing the use of TWW in forestry/agroforestry
• One year of activities through project
GCP/RAB/013/ITA
• Building partne...
Innovative methodologies adopted for treating water:
fertirrigation

•

Ferti-irrigation system:
wastewater used is only p...
Innovative methodologies adopted for treating water:
Phyto-depuration

•

Phyto-depuration: wastewater is filtered by vege...
Project Activities – Algeria

Provide support to the establishment of a phyto-depuration
plant in the oasis of Brézina for...
Project Activities – Egypt
•

Provide support to the
Government of Egypt to
develop a Forest
Management Plan for a
1,000 f...
Project Activities – Morocco

• Design and development of a system that
will use partially treated wastewater for
fertirri...
Project Activities – Tunisia
• Design of a phytodepuration plant in
Ouechtata to improve
water quality for
domestic consum...
Strengthening transfer of knowledge through
networking and communication

• PhD student University of
Marrakech – Universi...
Strengthening national and international partnerships
FAO expected impacts on the use of TWW
in forestry/agroforestry
• Increased quality and availability of water for agrofore...
•

THANK YOU
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Technical Session 2: Use of treated waste water in forestry and agroforestry systems (GCP/RAB/013/ITA)

466 views

Published on

Technical Session 2: Use of treated waste water in forestry and agroforestry systems (GCP/RAB/013/ITA), By Alberto Del Lungo, FAO Forestry Department, Land and Water Days in Near East & North Africa, 15-18 December 2013, Amman, Jordan

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
466
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • On project countries:Increased quality and availability of water for agro-forestry production;Poverty reduction through: 1) increased food security 2) enhanced income opportunities (the improvement of agroforestry production (availability of trees for land protection, shelterbelts, fodder, biomass, fuelwood….) improves the income of rural population);Desertification control and improvement of soil quality and productivity;Facilitate networking and exchange of information on the use of TWW via technical and scientific cooperation, student and experts exchanges and website;Training provided at different levels: a Moroccan PhD student will be trained at the University of Basilicata; Scientists of the University of Alexandria and professionals of the Undersecretariat for afforestation will be trained in forest management practices; project stakeholder countries will be connected through a Project website for networking and exchange of information on the use of TWW.On donor country:Increased visibility of Italy through involvement of Italian project partner institutions. The Italian contribution is not only financial (Ministry of Foreign Affairs) but also technical. Many institutions are involved as project partners (CorpoForestaledelloStato, National Council for Researches, Research Council in Agriculture, University of Basilicata, University of Tuscia) in transferring Italian knowledge and technology through technical and scientific training and country capacity building.
  • Technical Session 2: Use of treated waste water in forestry and agroforestry systems (GCP/RAB/013/ITA)

    1. 1. Near East & North Africa 15-18 December 2013 Technical Session 2: Use of treated waste water in forestry and agroforestry systems (GCP/RAB/013/ITA) Alberto Del Lungo, FAO Forestry Department
    2. 2. NENA Countries • Evapotranspiration exceeds precipitation – no matter the amount • Water scarcity limits the production of crops forage, wood and other ecosystem services World Drylands
    3. 3. Forestry in some Mediterranean countries with arid zones Country Total forest area mill ha Planted forest area mill ha % tot for Libya 0.2 0.2 100 Sudan 70 6.1 8.7 Turkey 11 3.4 30.2 Spain 18 2.7 14.7 Egypt 0.07 0.07 100 Tunisia 1 0.7 70 Source: FAO Forest Resource Assessment 2010
    4. 4. Non-conventional waters • Alternative sources of water to be utilized in support of fresh waters (mainly agriculture and domestic uses) • To be used, need – either to be generated as by specialized processes (e.g. desalination) or – suitable pre-use treatment and/or appropriate soil–water–crop management strategies when used for irrigation
    5. 5. Use of non conventional waters in arid zones, why? • • • • • • • To improve availability of water in arid zones To reduce forestry and agroforestry degradation To reduce soil erosion and low water retention capacity To combat Desertification To improve land productivity To strengthen country capacity building To ensure food security and poverty alleviation
    6. 6. Non-conventional waters • Seawater • Brackish water • Harvested rainwater • Ground water • Agricultural drainage water • Urban-wastewater
    7. 7. Urban wastewater • Is an unconventional and non-competitive water resource with fresh water • Is often the most available water resource in dry areas and areas with low availability of fresh water • Provide environmental benefits to receiving water bodies and reduce CO2 emissions
    8. 8. Treated wastewater, why? • Arid zones countries are lacking of fresh water and are “reach” of untreated waste water • Wastewater discharged in the environment creates serious problems of environmental pollution and increase of soil salinity and desertification BUT • If treated well can provide an alternative source of water and reduce competition for fresh water • Can be safely used on fruit trees and in forestry systems for provision of wood and biomass • Can be used on integrated landscape management: forestry and agroforestry systems
    9. 9. FAO Forestry priorities on TWW • • • • • Support food security through the safe use of nonconventional water in forestry/agro-forestry systems of arid zones Respond to the request of technical support from NENA countries Transfer knowledge and technology on the safe use of nonconventional water in agriculture Develop partnerships among country research institutions Expand to other countries that have already requested to participate these activities (Bahrain, Libya, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Yemen…)
    10. 10. Testing the use of TWW in forestry/agroforestry • One year of activities through project GCP/RAB/013/ITA • Building partnerships with national/international scientific research institutions • Transfer/sharing knowledge on the safe use of treated waste water in forestry/agroforestry • Implementing pilot projects in 4 Mediterranean countries
    11. 11. Innovative methodologies adopted for treating water: fertirrigation • Ferti-irrigation system: wastewater used is only partially treated. Most of the organic matter is re-used for irrigation to increase carbon storage in the soil (University of Basilicata, Italy)
    12. 12. Innovative methodologies adopted for treating water: Phyto-depuration • Phyto-depuration: wastewater is filtered by vegetation. The System is cost-effective, affordable and sustainable for rural communities in remote dry areas (University of Tuscia, Italy)
    13. 13. Project Activities – Algeria Provide support to the establishment of a phyto-depuration plant in the oasis of Brézina for woody biomass production Design and set up of phyto-depuration plants to improve water quality and availability and to fight sand encroachment in the oasis of Taghit
    14. 14. Project Activities – Egypt • Provide support to the Government of Egypt to develop a Forest Management Plan for a 1,000 feddans (420 ha) plantation irrigated using treated wastewater, located in Ismailia, Serapium • Provide training support to national forestry professionals • Ensure sustainable forest management and future increase to planted forest area
    15. 15. Project Activities – Morocco • Design and development of a system that will use partially treated wastewater for fertirrigation of a 10 hectares palm tree section of the Green Belt of Marrakech • Establishment of a buffer zone of planted forests species to protect the green belt and reduce soil erosion
    16. 16. Project Activities – Tunisia • Design of a phytodepuration plant in Ouechtata to improve water quality for domestic consumption and agricultural needs • Design of a fertirrigation system for olive trees and biomass production in Haffouz
    17. 17. Strengthening transfer of knowledge through networking and communication • PhD student University of Marrakech – University of Basilicata • Training in Egypt • Workshop in Marrakech, Morocco • Workshop in Cairo, Egypt • Workshop in Potenza, Italy • Project website as document repository of the activities
    18. 18. Strengthening national and international partnerships
    19. 19. FAO expected impacts on the use of TWW in forestry/agroforestry • Increased quality and availability of water for agroforestry production • Increased food security • Enhanced income opportunities • Desertification control and improvement of soil quality and productivity • Facilitate networking and exchange of information on the use of TWW • Transfer of knowledge and integration within participant countries
    20. 20. • THANK YOU

    ×