Forest monitoring and
forest change:
1990-2010
R. D’Annunzio
E.L. Lindquist
K.G. MacDicken
FAO Forestry
In 1923 the
world first
learned about
global forest
resources… … in 1948 FAO
began
monitoring
forest resource
change
…. so what difference did this
knowledge make?
Four key global results have made a
difference since 1923…
Widespread forest loss
in the tropics was detected1
Resulting in 60+ years of investment
… resulting in increased planting
Gaps in wood supply were identified
2
Forest conversion was identified as a
contributor to global climate change
Forest management is now part of
global mitigat...
Remote sensing was proven as a tool
for monitoring forest resources
Leading to some 100 earth
observing satellites
4
Since 1948, most of this
information has come from one
source: the Global Forest
Resources Assessment (FRA)
...but no single source
of reporting data
is completely adequate...
… the combination of FRA country
reports and systemati...
In 2009 FAO and the EC Joint
Research Centre began
analysis of Landsat data to
assess forest land use change
The FRA Remote Sensing
Survey included 13,575 sample
sites with land use review
inputs from over 200 national
experts from...
Forestry Paper 169 provides methods and
results from 1990-2005…
Tropical: 1,730 (45%) Boreal: 1,190
(31%)
Temperate: 630 (16%)
Subtropical : 330 (8%)
World : 3,880
2010 forest area
(mill...
Annual global forest change:
15.5 million ha gross loss
10.2 million ha gross gain
5.3 million ha net loss
Or a ~110 milli...
...yet the story is really told at the
climatic domain level…
0
200
400
600
800
1,000
1,200
1,400
1,600
1,800
2,000
2,200
1990 2000 2010
Forestarea(millionhectares)
Year
Tropical
Borea...
Regions of significant change: Tropical South
America
Regions of significant change: Tropical Africa
Regions of significant change: Asia
Remote sensing provides clues to what
is happening with the world’s forests…
Which is complemented by ground-
based data o...
How much forest is there per person?*
* 50 countries for which data is available since 1923
In summary…
• Forest monitoring provides tangible
returns on investment
• Global forest area is decreasing at a
steady rat...
3/21/2014 24
Thank you
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Forest monitoring and forest change : 1990 - 2010

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  • Monitoring since 1923 has resulted in:
  • Detection of widespread forest loss in the tropicsResulting in 60 years of investment
  • A need for more wood…. And An increase in planted forest of ….
  • Understanding forests and climate changeInclusion of forests as part of global mitigation strategies
  • A need for remote sensing of earth resourcesLeading to some 100 earth observing satellites
  • Forest monitoring and forest change : 1990 - 2010

    1. 1. Forest monitoring and forest change: 1990-2010 R. D’Annunzio E.L. Lindquist K.G. MacDicken FAO Forestry
    2. 2. In 1923 the world first learned about global forest resources… … in 1948 FAO began monitoring forest resource change
    3. 3. …. so what difference did this knowledge make?
    4. 4. Four key global results have made a difference since 1923…
    5. 5. Widespread forest loss in the tropics was detected1 Resulting in 60+ years of investment
    6. 6. … resulting in increased planting Gaps in wood supply were identified 2
    7. 7. Forest conversion was identified as a contributor to global climate change Forest management is now part of global mitigation strategies 3
    8. 8. Remote sensing was proven as a tool for monitoring forest resources Leading to some 100 earth observing satellites 4
    9. 9. Since 1948, most of this information has come from one source: the Global Forest Resources Assessment (FRA)
    10. 10. ...but no single source of reporting data is completely adequate... … the combination of FRA country reports and systematic remote sensing adds value…
    11. 11. In 2009 FAO and the EC Joint Research Centre began analysis of Landsat data to assess forest land use change
    12. 12. The FRA Remote Sensing Survey included 13,575 sample sites with land use review inputs from over 200 national experts from 107 countries…
    13. 13. Forestry Paper 169 provides methods and results from 1990-2005…
    14. 14. Tropical: 1,730 (45%) Boreal: 1,190 (31%) Temperate: 630 (16%) Subtropical : 330 (8%) World : 3,880 2010 forest area (million hectares)
    15. 15. Annual global forest change: 15.5 million ha gross loss 10.2 million ha gross gain 5.3 million ha net loss Or a ~110 million ha total net loss from 1990-2010
    16. 16. ...yet the story is really told at the climatic domain level…
    17. 17. 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 2,000 2,200 1990 2000 2010 Forestarea(millionhectares) Year Tropical Boreal Temperate Subtropical How has forest area changed over time?
    18. 18. Regions of significant change: Tropical South America
    19. 19. Regions of significant change: Tropical Africa
    20. 20. Regions of significant change: Asia
    21. 21. Remote sensing provides clues to what is happening with the world’s forests… Which is complemented by ground- based data on:  Natural vs. planted forest  Forest stocks (volume, biomass, carbon)  Conservation and protection  Production and management  Social and economic values
    22. 22. How much forest is there per person?* * 50 countries for which data is available since 1923
    23. 23. In summary… • Forest monitoring provides tangible returns on investment • Global forest area is decreasing at a steady rate, but gains are occurring in some regions/forest types • Forest conversion continues in the tropics …. primarily due to demand for agriculture
    24. 24. 3/21/2014 24 Thank you

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