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Briefing for Ms. Maria Helena Semedo

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Briefing for Ms. Semedo. Presentation by Arni Arni M. Mathiesen, 24 September 2013.

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Briefing for Ms. Maria Helena Semedo

  1. 1. FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURE DEPARTMENT 24 September 2013 Presentation by Árni M. Mathiesen Assistant Director-General Fisheries & Aquaculture Department Briefing for Ms. Maria Helena Semedo
  2. 2. Global Fisheries and Aquaculture: Opportunities and Challenges Seoul, Korea
  3. 3. Global Contribution of Fisheries and Aquaculture to Food Security
  4. 4. 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 Millionsoftons Capture Aquaculture World fish production (1950 – 2010)
  5. 5. Country Production World rank China 35,074,560 1 India 3,791,920 2 Viet Nam 2,556,200 3 Indonesia 1,749,291 4 Thailand 1,396,020 5 Bangladesh 1,064,285 6 Norway 961,840 7 Chile 792,891 8 Myanmar 778,096 9 Philippines 737,397 10
  6. 6.  Major source of animal proteins and micronutrients for many coastal populations  Unique source of poly-unsaturated fatty acids (DHA, EPA) for optimal brain development and the prevention of coronary heart disease  Unique & complete source of micronutrients (calcium, iodine, zinc, iron, selenium,...)  Source of vitamins (A, D, B group)generally scarce in rural diets Fish: Informati on
  7. 7. Micronutrient deficiency Level of micronutrient in 100 g edible part Recommended daily intake for children: 250 million preschool children are vitamin A deficient Small sized fish eaten whole, good source; > 2 500 µg RAE in 100 g Mola (Amblypharyngodon mola) 500 µg RAE 54 countries are still iodine-deficient Seafood nearly the only natural food source of iodine; 250 µg iodine in 100 g Cod (Gadhus morhua) 120 µg Iron deficiency affects about 2 billion people Small sized fish eaten whole, good source; 45 mg iron in 100 g Chanwa pileng (Esomus longimanus) 8.9 mg 800 000 child deaths per year are attributable to zinc deficiency Small sized fish eaten whole, good source; 20 mg zinc in 100 g Chanwa pileng (Esomus longimanus) 3.7 mg Fish: Informati on
  8. 8. 22.6 19.3 11.6 11.0 7.4 7.0 24.2 16.5 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 Asia Africa Europe Oceania Northern America Latin America & Caribbean LIFDC's WORLD Fish as percentage of total animal protein intake
  9. 9. Global Contribution of Fisheries and Aquaculture to Social and Economic Development
  10. 10.  54.8 million total employment (2010) ◦ 90% small scale ◦ 38.2 million capture ◦ 16.6 million aquaculture
  11. 11. 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 1961 1967 1973 1979 1985 1991 1997 2003 2008 Million tonnes (live weight) Utilizationofworldfisheriesproduction(1961-2008) Non-food purposes Canning Curing Freezing Marketing asfresh produce
  12. 12. 14 Fisheries US $ 100 billion Primary processing US $ 90 billion Secondary processing US $ 180 billion Distribution US $ 350 billionAquaculture US $ 98 billion Employment in fisheries and aquaculture: - 52 million persons in fisheries and aquaculture 2008 -195 million along the value chain -- 660 - 880 million persons (12%) depend on the sector for their livelihoods
  13. 13. Enabling Trade and Wealth Extraction
  14. 14. 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 BillionsofUS$ Developed countries Developing countries Source: GTIS ® (2012)
  15. 15. -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Fish Coffee Rubber Bananas Cocoa Meat Tea Sugar Tobacco Rice US$ billions Net trade income of developing countries from various agricultural commodities 1987 1997 2007
  16. 16. Shrimp 3,450 Tilapia 2,500 Salmon 1,540 Pangasius 1,375 Channel catfish 350 Trout 320 Seabream 160 Seabass 150 Other flatfish 125 Barramundi 45 Cobia 40 Atlantic cod 23 Oysters 4,320 Clams, cockles, arkshells 1,62 Mussels 1,620 Production 2008 (1000 t) Shrimp 3,450 Tilapia 2,500 Salmon 1,540 Pangasius 1,375 Channel catfish 350 Trout 320 Seabream 160 Seabass 150 Other flatfish 125 Barramundi 45 Cobia 40 Atlantic cod 23 Oysters 4,320 Clams, cockles, arkshells 1,62 Mussels 1,620
  17. 17. Future Challenges
  18. 18. • % of non-fully exploited stocks continuously decreased • 30% of stocks overexploited in 2009 • Fully exploited stocks at around 50% • An increasing trend in fully exploited stocks from 1990 to present Year % 1980 1990 2000 2010 0204060 Fully exploited Non-fully fished Overfished
  19. 19. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 77 67 81 71 48,58&88 61 21 57 87 51 27 37 41 47 34 31 Non-fully exploited Fully exploited Overexploited
  20. 20. Fish supply (mt) 2010 (baseline) 2020/2030 projection Aquaculture 59 95/123 Capture fisheries 88 88/88 Total supply 147 168/211 % of aquaculture: 40 (48 for human consumption) 57/58 (65/65 for human consumption) Source: Estimation of FI Department- 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 Millionstonnes World Fish Production Capture fisheries Aquaculture Source: FAO FISHSTAT
  21. 21. Increasing demand: 1. Population increase 2. Economic development 3. Increased consumption Decreasing resource base: 1. Overexploited fish stocks 2. IUU fishing 3. Overcapacity in fishing fleets 4. Degraded environment and ecosystems 5. Climate Changes 6. Post harvest losses
  22. 22. Thank you!
  23. 23.  Vision: A world in which responsible and sustainable use of fisheries and aquaculture resources make an optimal contribution to human well being, food security and poverty alleviation  Mission: To strengthen global governance, the managerial and technical capacities of Members and RFBs, and lead consensus building towards improved conservation and utilization of aquatic resources  Values: Sustainability, Universality, Excellence, Objectivity, Equity
  24. 24. Fisheries and Aquaculture Department Fisheries and Aquaculture Policy and Economics Division Policy, Economics and Institutions FIPI Products, Trade and Marketing FIPM Statistics and Information FIPS Fisheries and Aquaculture Resources Use and Conservation Division Marine and Inland Fisheries FIRF Fishing Operations and Technology FIRO Aquaculture FIRA Programme Coordination Unit FishCode Programme Assistant Director-General
  25. 25.  Conference  Council  COFI, COFI Bureau Sc. Trade Sc. Aquaculture  FI  Director General (ODG)  Deputy Director General Natural Resources(DDN)  FI (FI ADG)
  26. 26.  Regional offices  Sub-regional offices  Liaison Offices  Country Offices  Headquarter Departments  FID  FIP  FIR  FishCode
  27. 27. Sustainable management and utilization of natural resources Global Goals Eradicate hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition Elimination of poverty through economic and social progress for all SO1: Contribute to the eradication of hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition SO 4: Enable more inclusive and efficient agricultural and food systems at local, national and international levels SO 3: Reduce rural poverty SO 5: Increase the resilience of livelihoods to threats and crises SO 2: Increase and improve provision of goods and services from agriculture, forestry and fisheries in a sustainable manner Organization al Outcomes Organization al Outcomes Organization al Outcomes Organization al Outcomes Organization al Outcomes Outputs Outputs Outputs Outputs Outputs Outputs Outputs Outputs Outputs Outputs FAO Enabling Environment Development outcome indicators for monitoring progress, which measure the long term effects to which OOs contribute Organizational Outcome indicators to measure changes produced from the use of FAO outputs, among others Enabling functions for improved corporate performance monitored by key performance indicators Output indicators for monitoring FAO deliverables Outreach Efficient and effective administration Information Technology FAO Governance, oversight and direction Objective on technical quality, knowledge and services, including the cross-cutting themes: gender and governance
  28. 28. FI staff Regular Programme staff 129 Project staff 55 Technical Officers in the field 18 Programme of Work and Budget PWB 2012-13 Regular Programme USD 66 million Voluntary contributions USD 86 million FI KEY INFORMATION
  29. 29. International regulatory framework for fisheries Governance 1995 Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries 1993Compliance Agreement IPOAs • Seabirds 1999 • Sharks 1999 • Capacity 1999 • IUU 2001 •[Kyoto POA ’95] Port State Measures: Model Scheme 2005 + 2009 Agreement Flag State Performance Strategies: •Status & Trends on Capture Fisheries 2003 • Status & Trends on Aquaculture 2007 International Guidelines: • Sea-Turtles2009 • Ecolabelling 2009 • Deep sea fisheries 2009 • By-catch management & discards reduction 2010 1982 UN Convention on the Law of the Sea 1995UNFSA 1992 UNCED: Rio Declaration + Agenda 21 Ecosystem approach to fisheries: Reykjavík 2001 2002 WSSD Johannesburg Plan of Implementation Rio + 20 U. N Conference on Sustainable Development Sustainable Development Goals Post 2015
  30. 30. Maintaining biodiversity & ecosystem services Maximizing contribution to food security Optimizing social- economic benefits Three Pillars
  31. 31. Increasing demand: 1. Population increase 2. Economic development 3. Increased consumption Decreasing resource base: 1. Overexploited fish stocks 2. IUU fishing 3. Overcapacity in fishing fleets 4. Degraded environment and ecosystems 5. Climate Changes 6. Post harvest losses
  32. 32.  “The Future We Want”  Un-Oceans  Oceans Compact  GPO  GEF- ABNJ  RFMOs-Regional Seas  GEF 6- Sig. Programmes  Blue Economy Process  The Hague Summit  EC Capacity Conference  SCs. and COFI  Flag State Performance  Small Scale Fisheries  GAAP  Oceans SDG  FAO Global Blue Economy Initiative
  33. 33.  Participate on behalf of FAO in global Oceans related activities  Lead FAO Global Blue Economy Initiative/Project  Participate/lead in other FAO global initiatives/projects  Support and participate in Decentralised Offices, regional priorities, CPFs on regional, sub-regional and country level.  Organise and support the activities of COFI, COFI Bureau, COFI SCs, produce SOFIA flagship publication and operate, organise and support corporate activities including article XIV and article XI bodies, liaise with other RFBs/RFMOs and host the Regional Secretariats Network.  Create and run a technical network based on our existing regional focal groups.  Advocate for CCRF. ADG role, CCRF evaluation report.
  34. 34. Takk Fyrir! Obrigado! Thank you!
  35. 35. FIP is responsible for programs and activities related to fisheries and aquaculture dealing with:  economic, social, institutional, governance and policy aspects  Post harvest utilization, marketing and trade  Statistics and information
  36. 36. Fisheries and Aquaculture Policy and Economics Division Policy, Economics and Institutions FIPI Products, Trade and Marketing FIPM Statistics and Information FIPS
  37. 37. FI staff Regular Programme staff: 64 Project staff: 31 Programme of Work and Budget PWB 2012-13 Regular Programme USD 21,178,000 million Voluntary contributions USD 5,486,000 million FIP KEY INFORMATION
  38. 38. HOW DO WE GET THE JOB DONE? Putting information within reach: SOFIA, TP, Statistics, FIRMS,... Sharing policy expertise: CCRF, Guidelines, Agreements Providing a meeting place for nations: COFI, COFI:FT, EC, TC Bringing knowledge to the field: Technical assistance, capacity building, policy advice
  39. 39. International regulatory framework for fisheries Governance 1995 Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries 1993Compliance Agreement IPOAs • Seabirds 1999 • Sharks 1999 • Capacity 1999 • IUU 2001 •[Kyoto POA ’95] Port State Measures: Model Scheme 2005 + 2009 Agreement Flag State Performance Strategies: •Status & Trends on Capture Fisheries 2003 • Status & Trends on Aquaculture 2007 International Guidelines: • Sea-Turtles2009 • Ecolabelling 2009 • Deep sea fisheries 2009 • By-catch management & discards reduction 2010 1982 UN Convention on the Law of the Sea 1995UNFSA 1992 UNCED: Rio Declaration + Agenda 21 Ecosystem approach to fisheries: Reykjavík 2001 2002 WSSD Johannesburg Plan of Implementation Rio + 20 U. N Conference on Sustainable Development Sustainable Development Goals Post 2015
  40. 40. Regional Fisheries Bodies
  41. 41. Humanitarian emergencies Bringing knowledge to the field
  42. 42. Sustainable management and utilization of natural resources Global Goals Eradicate hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition Elimination of poverty through economic and social progress for all SO1: Contribute to the eradication of hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition SO 4: Enable more inclusive and efficient agricultural and food systems at local, national and international levels SO 3: Reduce rural poverty SO 5: Increase the resilience of livelihoods to threats and crises SO 2: Increase and improve provision of goods and services from agriculture, forestry and fisheries in a sustainable manner Organization al Outcomes Organization al Outcomes Organization al Outcomes Organization al Outcomes Organization al Outcomes Outputs Outputs Outputs Outputs Outputs Outputs Outputs Outputs Outputs Outputs FAO Enabling Environment Development outcome indicators for monitoring progress, which measure the long term effects to which OOs contribute Organizational Outcome indicators to measure changes produced from the use of FAO outputs, among others Enabling functions for improved corporate performance monitored by key performance indicators Output indicators for monitoring FAO deliverables Outreach Efficient and effective administration Information Technology FAO Governance, oversight and direction Objective on technical quality, knowledge and services, including the cross-cutting themes: gender and governance
  43. 43. !ً‫شكرا‬ 谢谢! Thank you! Merci! Gracias! Спасибо!
  44. 44. FIR FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURE RESOURCES USE AND CONSERVATON DIVISION
  45. 45. FIR Responsibilities All programmes and activities related to: - Conservation of the living aquatic resources used by fisheries and aquaculture  - Development & management of responsible fisheries and aquaculture  - Development of fisheries and aquaculture technology
  46. 46. Fisheries and Aquaculture Policy and Economics Division (FIP) Fisheries and Aquaculture Resources Use and Conservation Division (FIR) Policy, Economics and Institutions Branch (FIPI) Products, Trade and Marketing Branch (FIPM) Marine and Inland Fisheries Branch (FIRF) Fishing Operations and Technology Branch (FIRO) Statistics and Information Branch (FIPS) Aquaculture Branch (FIRA) Assistant Director-General FishCode Programme (FIDF) Assistant Director-General Programme Coordination Unit (FIDP) DDG-NR
  47. 47. Director __________ Deputy Director FIRA Branch Chief: Jiansan Jia 4 teams led by Team Leaders FIRF Branch Chief: Yimin Ye 4 teams led by Team Leaders Project Operations Group FIRO Branch Chief: Frank Chopin 2 teams led by Team Leaders
  48. 48. FIR RP Posts: 57 EBF Posts: 19 Total Posts: 76 Total RP Fund: $ 21 million FIRA RP Posts: 19 (12 P + 7 G) EBF Posts: 2 Total: 21 Total RP Fund: $7,474,992 FIRF RP Posts: 21 (13 P+ 8 G) EBF Posts: 15 Total: 36 Total RP Fund: $ 7,844,375 Total EBF fund: $ 6,898,438 FIRO RP Posts: 11 (8 P + 3 G) EBF Posts: 0 Total: 11 Total RP Fund: $ 4,840,067 FIRX RP Posts: 5 (D-2, D-1, G-6, G-5 x 2) EBF Posts: 0 Total: 5 Total RP Fund: $ 1,069,000
  49. 49. Key FIR-Led Activities EF Nansen Global Record of Fishing Vessels Mediterranean Sea Projects Capacity Building under South-South and Triangular Cooperations Ecosystem Approach for Fisheries Ecosystem Approach for Aquaculture Small Scale Fisheries Normative and field-based efforts to combat illegal fishing (GR, VMS, etc.) By Catch Programs (CTI & LAC)
  50. 50. Surveyed Areas of the Nansen Vessel 27WWW.FAO.ORG
  51. 51. Common forum for management discussions and agreements Formal meeting point Focus on trust and cooperation Level Playing field Identify Common Interests/Issues Centre points for cooperation Take into account differences in capacity and culture: Sub-regional Approach Capacity Development for National/Local Institutions Teach HOW TO FISH
  52. 52. FAO Conference COFI / COFI Sub Committee / Regional Conferences FAO Technical Meeting FAO Expert Group Meeting FAO Experts & Partners CONTRIBUTION OF FIR EXPERTS IN THE FAO DECISION MAKING PROCESSES
  53. 53. FIR EXPERTS CAN OFFER: -Technical Guidance - Global reviews on special topics - Resource status reviews & biological descriptions Policy Implementation Pilot Project Implementation
  54. 54. FIR IN THE NEW FAO STRATEGIC FRAME WORK List of FIR Products and Services FIR In the SO1, SO2, SO3, SO4, SO5 SOs Outcomes and Outputs Resource Mobilizations, Partnerships Decentralized Offices
  55. 55. Fisheries & Aquaculture under South-South and Triangular Cooperation Schemes (FI, NR, AG, TC), Preparation for the implementation of Blue Economy in the Targeted Countries (FI, NR, TC, AG, FO), Global Program on Decent Work for Food Security and Sustainable Rural Development to be implemented in Targeted Countries (FI, AG,NR, TC) Global Aquaculture Advancement Program (GAAP) to be implemented in targeted countries. TUNA – ABNJ (FI, NR, TC) Climate Change, Conservation and Livelihood in the Aquatic, Marine and Coastal Areas (FI, FO, AG, NR, TC) FIR Key Activities in the New Strategic Framework
  56. 56. a FIR PRESENT AND FUTURE PARTNERS Norway Spain Japan PR China USA Indonesia IDBEuropean Union Brazil PR China
  57. 57. Thank you!

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