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Empowering women to provide healthy diets for infants
and young children, the ENAM project in Ghana
Grace S. Marquis, PhD
...
Agro-business skills Nutrition knowledge
Economics
Animal husbandry,
food processing &
storage
Marketing
linkages
Child nu...
Project design
16-month study in 3 ecological zones
6 intervention communities
n=179 households
6 comparison communities
n...
Intervention
1. Microcredit for small businesses
1st 4-month loan = US$50
Groups self-defined & guaranteed
Conditional fut...
Women’s perception of improvement in their
businesses
“I know I am doing well and
am more successful than other
members. I...
Women’s improved nutrition knowledge
“… I did not know that meat or
eggs were good for children and
would make them grow w...
Children’s improved quality of diet
Children in intervention
households consumed
53% more ASF than
those in comparison
hou...
Children’s improved nutritional status
Marquis et al. J Nutr 2015
-2
-1.5
-1
-0.5
0
0.5
1
Z-scoreatmaximumgroupdifference
...
KEY MESSAGE
Interventions must address inadequate knowledge and skills, and
economic barriers for women to become empowere...
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Empowering women to provide healthy diets for infants and young children, Enhancing Child Nutrition through Animal Source Food Management (ENAM) project in Ghana, by Grace Marquis, School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition - McGill University

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"www.fao.org/about/meetings/sustainable-food-systems-nutrition-symposium

The International Symposium on Sustainable Food Systems for Healthy Diets and Improved Nutrition was jointly held by FAO and WHO in December 2016 to explore policies and programme options for shaping the food systems in ways that deliver foods for a healthy diet, focusing on concrete country experiences and challenges. This Symposium waas the first large-scale contribution under the UN Decade of Action for Nutrition 2016-2025. This presentation was part of Parallel session 3.3: Empowering women as key drivers of food system change"

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Empowering women to provide healthy diets for infants and young children, Enhancing Child Nutrition through Animal Source Food Management (ENAM) project in Ghana, by Grace Marquis, School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition - McGill University

  1. 1. Empowering women to provide healthy diets for infants and young children, the ENAM project in Ghana Grace S. Marquis, PhD McGill University In collaboration with: University of Ghana EK Colecraft, O Sakyi-Dawson, A Lartey, BK Ahunu Iowa State University LM Butler, MB Reddy, HH Jensen, E Huff-Lonergan With funding from: Global Livestock-CRSP/US-AID Iowa State University, University of Ghana, McGill University
  2. 2. Agro-business skills Nutrition knowledge Economics Animal husbandry, food processing & storage Marketing linkages Child nutrition knowledge Cultural beliefs about foods Household food allocation Women’s access to income Animal source foods (ASF) in children’s diets Model developed from formative research on children’s diet in Ghana
  3. 3. Project design 16-month study in 3 ecological zones 6 intervention communities n=179 households 6 comparison communities n=287 households Guinea Savannah Forest Transitional Coastal Savannah
  4. 4. Intervention 1. Microcredit for small businesses 1st 4-month loan = US$50 Groups self-defined & guaranteed Conditional future loans 2. Weekly group meetings Entrepreneurial education Topics: marketing, customer care, financial literacy Practice: skits on learned lessons Nutrition education Topics: benefits of ASF, balanced meal, hygiene Practice: cooking competition Repayment of loan & savings deposits 3. Additional training Topics: poultry raising, fish smoking
  5. 5. Women’s perception of improvement in their businesses “I know I am doing well and am more successful than other members. I believe in the project. I follow their lessons well and practice most of the things we are taught”. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Business expanded Business diversified Percentage(%) Intervention Comparison * p<0.01 * * Homiah et al. AJFAND 2012 Butler et al. AJFAND 2012
  6. 6. Women’s improved nutrition knowledge “… I did not know that meat or eggs were good for children and would make them grow well. In our culture, meat is usually not given to children, so anytime I prepared food with meat, I would give the meat to the adults… Now I know meat and eggs will make a child grow well and strong.” 0 20 40 60 80 100 Change in knowledge score Percentage(%) Intervention Comparison p<0.05 Butler et al. AJFAND 2012 Christian et al. PAA conference 2013
  7. 7. Children’s improved quality of diet Children in intervention households consumed 53% more ASF than those in comparison households (p<0.001), primarily reflecting more ASF purchased from the market 0 20 40 60 80 100 Percentofchildrenconsuming(%) Intervention Comparison Intervention Comparison * * * * * * ** * Marquis & Colecraft. Food Nutr Bull 2014 * p<0.05 group differences Homiah et al. AJFAND 2012 Baseline Endline
  8. 8. Children’s improved nutritional status Marquis et al. J Nutr 2015 -2 -1.5 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 Z-scoreatmaximumgroupdifference Intervention Comparison Weight- for-age BMI- for-age Height- for-age +0.32* +0.36* +0.19* *p<0.05
  9. 9. KEY MESSAGE Interventions must address inadequate knowledge and skills, and economic barriers for women to become empowered and be able to address the nutrition needs of their young children.

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