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The business case for emotional intelligence

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The business case for emotional intelligence

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The business case for emotional intelligence

  1. 1. The Business Case For Emotional Intelligence Michael Collins
  2. 2. What is Emotional Intelligence? Was there ever a time … When you said or did something out of anger that you later regretted? When you misread someone’s intentions or the political climate at work? When you found it hard to focus on a task because of how you were feeling at the time? … haven’t we all?
  3. 3. What is Emotional Intelligence? “Emotional intelligence refers to the capacity to deal effectively with one’s own and others’ emotions. When applied to the workplace, it involves the capacity to effectively perceive, express, understand and manage emotions in a professional manner.” (Stough and Palmer, 2002)
  4. 4. What is Emotional Intelligence? Unlike personality and IQ, EI is regarded as a set of skills or abilities that can be learned and developed. Research by Swinburne University led to the development of a five dimensional model known as the Genos EI Instrument.
  5. 5. The Genos EI Instrument Five Dimensions: Emotional Recognition and Expression Understanding Emotions Emotions Direct Cognition Emotional Management Emotional Control
  6. 6. Emotional Recognition & Expression The ability to perceive and express one’s own emotions People high in this dimension typically… Find it easy to talk about their feelings with colleagues Colleagues can easily tell how they are feeling Can describe their feelings on an issue to colleagues Have little trouble finding the right words to express how they feel at work
  7. 7. Understanding Emotions The ability to perceive and understand the emotions of others People high in this dimension typically… Readily understand the reasons why they have upset someone at work When discussing an issue, find it easy to tell whether colleagues feel the same way as they do Can pick-up on the emotional tone of staff meetings Watch the way clients react to things when trying to build rapport with them
  8. 8. Emotions Direct Cognition The extent to which emotions and emotional information is utilised in reasoning and decision making People high in this dimension typically… Attend to their feelings on a matter when making important work-related decisions Weigh-up how they feel about different solutions to work related problems Believe that feelings should be considered when making important work related decisions When trying to recall certain situations at work, tend to think about how they felt
  9. 9. Emotional Management The ability to manage one’s own and others emotions at work People high in this dimension typically… Intervene in an effective way when colleagues get ‘worked-up’ Overcome conflict with colleagues by influencing their moods and emotions When stressed, remain focused on what they are doing When upset by a colleague, think through what the person has said and find a solution to the problem
  10. 10. Emotional Control The ability to effectively control strong emotions People high in this dimension typically… Overcome anger at work by thinking through what’s causing it Find it easy to concentrate on a task when really excited about something Can be upset at work and still think clearly When anxious, remain focused on what they are doing
  11. 11. 1. Emotional Emotional Intelligence Recognition & Expression 2. Understanding Emotions 3. Emotions Direct Cognition 4. Emotional Management 5. Emotional Control
  12. 12. Why is EI Important? Research conducted by Swinburne University (with Australian companies) has found a relationship between EI and: Occupational stress Absenteeism Teamwork effectiveness The quality of interpersonal relationships Performance (customer service and sales) Innovation and creativity Job satisfaction and organisational commitment
  13. 13. Why is EI Important? We also know that EI is related to: Successful leadership styles: – ‘Transformational’ as opposed to ‘Transactional’ or ‘Passive- Avoidant’ leadership behaviours Salary, number of direct reports and level of management/ leadership responsibility Research shows that about 36% of the variance in Australian leadership success can be accounted for by EI
  14. 14. Why is EI Important? Some real-life applications: Helping managers and staff give and receive feedback (eg. performance appraisals) Helping managers develop effective coaching skills Helping sales professionals understand their customer’s needs more effectively Helping staff deal with frustrated customers more effectively Helping managers and staff deal with workplace stress and conflict more effectively
  15. 15. How can we develop EI? Insight I can see my strengths and gaps Motivation I can see the value in closing these gaps Planning I have an action plan that will close these gaps Activity My perspective has been considered when selecting development activities Consolidation My learning will be reinforced over the longer term Tracking I can measure my achievements
  16. 16. Insight, Motivation & Planning Initial information sessions: What is EI? How does it help me to be more effective at work? What’s the plan going forward? On-line self or 360-degree EI assessment One-to-one or group interpretation sessions Individual development planning
  17. 17. Activity One-to-one coaching Group coaching Group workshops: Understanding how EI supports interpersonal effectiveness (eg. communication, leadership or teamwork) Skill development activities Direct application to workplace issues
  18. 18. Consolidation Team meetings Review and reinforcement sessions Workplace projects Peer-group learning Internal coaching or mentoring External coaching (one-to-one or group) Posters, reminders, intranet
  19. 19. Tracking On-line self or 360-degree EI assessment One-to-one or group interpretation session Group reports
  20. 20. Five Key Lessons 1. The need for senior management commitment and support 2. Making a clear link between EI and its practical application in the workplace 3. The importance of up-front information sessions 4. Effective debriefing and interpretation of EI reports 5. The importance of follow-up and regular reinforcement activities
  21. 21. Questions?

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